Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two problems with my dropdown menu, one involving links, the other involving IE7 issues. Code follows after questions, and in both instances, I'm trying to avoid javascript (a key part of the project)

  1. I am successfully highlighting the text of the link when I hover, including some pixels above, below and left & right. However, the only part of the highlight that is clickable (i.e. where I can access a hyperlink) is where the text is, and I want to be able to have the entire highlight, padding and text, to be clickable. I've done it before, but I'm confused with the current code on how to fix it. Can anybody help me out?

  2. Using the same dropdown, everything is working fine, except in IE7. Some IE7 users complained that once they highlighted the menu item and the dropdown occurs, they only get down to about the 2nd item before the dropdown disappears, and it does it for every dropdown. I know it's an issue with IE7, but I need to get a work around for it. Any help at all?

My CSS code:

ul                          { list-style: none; }
p                           { margin: 8px 0; }
ul.dropdown                 { list-style-type:none;height:24px; top:2px; padding:0px 0px 0px 0px;;margin:0px 0px 0 1px;vertical-align:bottom; color:#000000; position: relative; }
ul.dropdown a:hover         { color: #000; }
ul.dropdown a:active        { color: #ffa500; }
ul.dropdown li              { float: left; position:relative; vertical-align:middle; background-position:0 -40px; padding: 2px 4px 5px 2px; margin-right:6px;}
ul.dropdown li a            { display: block; padding: 0px 0px; color: #222; text-decoration:none; vertical-align:middle; width:100%;}
ul.dropdown li:last-child a { border-right: none; }
ul.dropdown li.hover,
ul.dropdown li:hover        { background: #F3D673; color: black; position: relative; }
ul.dropdown li.hover a      { color: black; }

ul.dropdown ul              { width: 152px; visibility: hidden; position: absolute; top: 100%; left: -40px; z-index:60;}
ul.dropdown ul li           { font-weight: normal; background: #ECEAD8; color: #000; width:100%;/*border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc;*/ float: none; }
ul.dropdown ul li.nohover   { color: black; background: #ECEAD8; position:relative; }

ul.dropdown ul li a         { border-right: none; width: 100%; display: inline-block; min-height:1.4em;} 

ul.dropdown ul ul           { left:72.7%;top: 0px; width:158px; z-index:50; display:inline-block;}
ul.dropdown li:hover > ul   { visibility: visible; display:block; }

#arrowRight                 { float:right; margin-top:-11px;}
a.moreItems {background: url(/images/menu/arrow_r.gif) no-repeat right;}

Here is the HTML Code:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<link rel=stylesheet type="text/css" href="menustylesheet.css">
</head>
<body>
<table width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
    <tr>
        <td height="25" class="topmenu" bgcolor="##ECEAD8" nowrap>
<ul class="dropdown">
    <li><a href=""><b>Item 1</b> <img src="/images/menu/arrow_d.gif" border="0" height="7" width="7"></a>
        <ul>
            <li><a class="moreItems" href="">Item 1-1</a>
                <ul>
                    <li><a href="">Item 1-1-1</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>
            <li><a class="moreItems" href="">Item 1-2</a>
                <ul>
                    <li><a href="">Item 1-2-1</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>

            <li>Item 1-3 <div style="vertical-align:middle;"><img src="/images/menu/arrow_r.gif" id="arrowRight" border="0"></div>
                <ul>
                    <li><a href="">Item 1-3-1</a></li>
                    <li><a href="">Item 1-3-2</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>
            <li><a href="">Item 1-4</a></li>
            <li><a href="">Item 1-5</a></li>
    </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr><td bgcolor="##c0c0c0" style="height:1px;"></td></tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>

I apologize if this has been answered before, but I hope someone can pinpoint where in the code I need to change or modify to make it work.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I have an answer to your first problem. When doing this kind of menu. I stay as far away from padding as I can. I find it easier just to use margins, but for starters lets look at a page I built for you:

http://www.albatrossfonts.com/stack/ulbuttons.html

I'll explain this code below. Here is my HTML:

<div id="wrapper">

    <ul class="dropdown">
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
    </ul>

</div>

And the CSS:

.dropdown 
{
    width: 200px;
    display:block;
    margin: 200px auto 0 auto;
    list-style-type: none;
    padding: 0;
}

.dropdown li
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 1px 0 0 0;
    list-style-type: none;
    padding: 0;
}

.dropdown li a:link, .dropdown li a:visited 
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 0;
    color: #ffffff;
    background-color: #666666;
    text-decoration: none;
    text-indent: 12px;
    line-height: 44px;
}

.dropdown li a:hover
{
    background-color: #333333;
}

Notice that I declared a:link, instead of just a. I also declared a:visited since I want the visited state to be the same as the original state.

In the .dropdown entry, I simply defined a width for the list (ul) and made it display properly.

In the .dropdown li entry, I set the width and height of each list item, removed bullets, and set the display and float to make them display as a box. No padding. Just a box.

In the .dropdown li a:link, .dropdown li a:visited entry, what we are essentially doing is "filling" our list item boxes with a link, and it just so happens that we can define a link as a box as well. So I set the dimensions of the link to the exact same size as our li's (this is what makes the entire box clickable). Then set the display and float, and a background color, as well as a text color, or simply "color."

In order to get your text in the center, you should not use vertical-align. Use line-height, and set it to the same height as your li element. This will center your text in the box vertically.

To control where your text appears horizontally, set a text-indent property, use text-align. In this example, I used text-indent.

Finally, we define our a:hover state. It's important to remember that the only things you truly need to define here are any properties that actually change. In this case, the background color.

If you wanted to ad a state for the mouse down event, you could do something like:

.dropdown li a:active
{
    background-color: #000000;
    text-indent: 20px;
}

/////////// Edit////////////

Here's how you would use a single css styles for multiple menus or child menus.

html for 2 separate ul's:

<ul class="dropdown">
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
</ul>

<ul class="dropdown">
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
</ul>

CSS: (stays the same, because you assign both of them to the class "dropdown."

.dropdown 
    {
        width: 200px;
        display:block;
        margin: 200px auto 0 auto;
        list-style-type: none;
        padding: 0;
    }

.dropdown li
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 1px 0 0 0;
    list-style-type: none;
    padding: 0;
}

.dropdown li a:link, .dropdown li a:visited 
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 0;
    color: #ffffff;
    background-color: #666666;
    text-decoration: none;
    text-indent: 12px;
    line-height: 44px;
}

.dropdown li a:hover
{
    background-color: #333333;
}

If you want to apply your styles for a child ul, like this:

<ul class="dropdown">
     <li><a href="#">Button 1</a>
          <ul>
               <li><a href="#">subButton 1</li>
               <li><a href="#">subButton 2</li>
               <li><a href="#">subButton 3</li>
          </ul>
     </li>
     <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
     <li><a href="#">Button 1</a></li>
</ul>

You simply append your styles to include the child ul and child ui li, as follows; where .dropdown actually represents your first ul. So .dropdown(ul) --> li (list item in "dropdown" unordered list) --> ul (ul inside dropdown li) --> li (li inside dropdown ul li ul)

Sorry if that sounds confusing, but in other words, if you didn't assign a class to your parent ul at all, it would be ul li ul li to access a list item inside a child list.

.dropdown, dropdown li ul
{
    width: 200px;
    display:block;
    margin: 200px auto 0 auto;
    list-style-type: none;
    padding: 0;
}

.dropdown li, .dropdown li ul li
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 1px 0 0 0;
    list-style-type: none;
    padding: 0;
}

.dropdown li a:link, .dropdown li a:visited, .dropdown li ul li a:link, .dropdown li ul li a:visited
{
    width: 200px;
    height: 44px;
    display: block;
    float: left;
    margin: 0;
    color: #ffffff;
    background-color: #666666;
    text-decoration: none;
    text-indent: 12px;
    line-height: 44px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's cool! For dynamic multi-layered menus (i.e. multiple sub menus of whose quantity is determined dynamically), what would I need to do to dynamically give all the sub menus the same attributes and actions that the above code offers? –  user1100412 Jan 25 '12 at 22:54
    
@user1100412 You can do that easily by adding a comma, and then the class name of the submenu to the identifier (name) portion of the css, like this: .dropdown li:alink, .dropdownSubmenu li a:link { properties go here... } there is no limit to how many you can list, and all of the identifiers separated by commas will have the same properties this way. Lets say for example, there is only one property that's different, you can declare them individually somewhere else with no conflicts. It also makes your code way smaller. :) Did I answer your first question? –  jhilgert00 Jan 26 '12 at 19:23
    
Could you offer an example in your current code above? I'm trying it initially and I'm not having a lot of luck. –  user1100412 Jan 26 '12 at 20:58

http://www.webcredible.co.uk/user-friendly-resources/css/internet-explorer.shtml

^This has helped me on many occasions to find work-arounds for IE.

share|improve this answer
    
It's ok, but I don't think I'm going to find what I'm looking for. There were not any instances about drop-down menus. If there is a spot I overlooked, please guide me. Else, you or anyone else have any other suggestions or work-arounds? –  user1100412 Jan 25 '12 at 21:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.