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When I make a 3d bargraph with 4 or more values the graph looks correct but when I I try it with 3 the bars become triangles, what's going on?

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')

color_grade_classes = ['#80FF00','#FFFF00','#FF8000', '#FF0000']

for colors, rows  in zip(color_grade_classes, [3,2,1,0] ):  
  indexs = np.arange(3)
  heights = np.random.rand(3)
  print rows, indexs, heights, colors

  ax.bar(indexs, heights, zs = rows,  zdir='y', color=colors, alpha=0.8)

ax.set_xlabel('X')
ax.set_ylabel('Y')

plt.show()

generates this:

Triangular bar

but when I increase the number of indexes and heights to 5 I get this:

Correct bar

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2  
That looks like a possible bug. –  Thomas K Jan 25 '12 at 21:46
1  
with 3 you have triangles and with 2 bars it doesnt draw them... windows 7 matplotlib 1.1.0 –  joaquin Jan 25 '12 at 21:58
    
Does anyone know where I can report bugs in matplotlib? –  user1170056 Jan 26 '12 at 18:05
2  
See "Report a Problem" here: matplotlib.sourceforge.net/faq/troubleshooting_faq.html –  Scott B Feb 6 '12 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

This is almost certainly a bug. Trying your example code gives me the desired result of rectangular bars, with any number of points (tested with 1, 2, 3, 5, 15): Example of code working as desired for 3 points

I'm running matplotlib version 1.1.1rc, on linux. If you can, try updating to the latest version. Note that

import matplotlib
print matplotlib.__version__

will tell you what version you're using.

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The code also works as expected on Python 2.7.3/Matplotlib 1.1.1 on OS X 10.7.4, so it's indeed probably a bug. –  Tim Sep 5 '12 at 12:00

This is because you are only giving it 3 points to plot. Just change the code to following and it should work.

indexs = np.arange(4)  # not 3
heights = np.random.rand(4) # not 3
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