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I'm having problems setting up an Entity Framework 4 model.

A Contact object is exposed in the database as an updateable view. Also due to the history of the database, this Contact view has two different keys, one from a legacy system. So some other tables reference a contact with a 'ContactID' while other older tables reference it with a 'LegacyContactID'.

Since this is a view, there are no foreign keys in the database, and I'm trying to manually add associations in the designer. But the fluent associations don't seem to provide a way of specifying which field is referenced.

How do I build this model?

public class vwContact
{
  public int KeyField { get; set; }
  public string LegacyKeyField { get; set; }
}

public class SomeObject
{
  public virtual vwContact Contact { get; set; }
  public int ContactId { get; set; } //references vwContact.KeyField
}

public class LegacyObject
{
  public virtual vwContact Contact { get; set; }
  public string ContactId { get; set; } //references vwContact.LegacyKeyField
}

ModelCreatingFunction(modelBuilder)
{
  // can't set both of these, right?
  modelBuilder.Entity<vwContact>().HasKey(x => x.KeyField);
  modelBuilder.Entity<vwContact>().HasKey(x => x.LegacyKeyField);

  modelBuilder.Entity<LegacyObject>().HasRequired(x => x.Contact).??? 
  //is there some way to say which key field this reference is referencing?
}
share|improve this question
    
Maybe EF4 is not the right tool for the job. I have come to some conclusions why it may not be desirable to work with EF4 in your case, take a look at my answer... it is possible to workaround the limitations, but there are inconveniences. =\ – Miguel Angelo Feb 22 '12 at 0:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+400

EDIT 2: "New things have come to light, man" - His Dudeness

After a but more experimentation and news, I found using a base class and child classes with different keys will not work by itself. With code first especially, base entities must define a key if they are not explicitly mapped to tables.

I left the suggested code below because I still recommend using the base class for your C# manageability, but I below the code I have updated my answer and provided other workaround options.

Unfortunately, the truth revealed is that you cannot accomplish what you seek without altering SQL due to limitations on EF 4.1+ code first.


Base Contact Class

public abstract class BaseContact
{
   // Include all properties here except for the keys
   // public string Name { get; set; }
}

Entity Classes

Set this up via the fluent API if you like, but for easy illustration I've used the data annotations

public class Contact : BaseContact
{
   [Key]
   public int KeyField { get; set; }
   public string LegacyKeyField { get; set; }
}

public class LegacyContact : BaseContact
{
   public int KeyField { get; set; }
   [Key]
   public string LegacyKeyField { get; set; }    
}

Using the Entities

  1. Classes that reference or manipulate the contact objects should reference the base class much like an interface:

    public class SomeCustomObject
    {
       public BaseContact Contact { get; set; }
    }
    
  2. If later you need to programmatically determine what type you are working with use typeof() and manipulate the entity accordingly.

    var co = new SomeCustomObject(); // assume its loaded with data
    if(co.Contact == typeof(LegacyContact)
        // manipulate accordingly.
    

New Options & Workarounds

  1. As I suggested in comment before, you won't be able to map them to a single view/table anyway so you have a couple options:

    a. map your objects to their underlying tables and alter your "get/read" methods on repositories and service classes pull from the joined view -or-

    b. create a second view and map each object to their appropriate view.

    c. map one entity to its underlying table and one to the view.

Summary

Try (B) first, creating a separate view because it requires the least amount of change to both code and DB schema (you aren't fiddling with underlying tables, or affecting stored procedures). It also ensures your EF C# POCOs will function equivalently (one to a view and one to table may cause quirks). Miguel's answer below seems to be roughly the same suggestion so I would start here if it's possible.

Option (C) seems worst because your POCO entities may behave have unforseen quirks when mapped to different SQL pieces (tables vs. views) causing coding issues down the road.

Option (A), while it fits EF's intention best (entities mapped to tables), it means to get your joined view you must alter your C# services/repositories to work with the EF entities for Add, Update, Delete operations, but tell the Pull/Read-like methods to grab data from the joint views. This is probably your best choice, but involves more work than (B) and may also affect Schema in the long run. More complexity equals more risk.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input -- I don't have time to run through this today, but I'll try to get to it within a week. – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 20:52
    
Adding the second view does seem to be the path of least resistance here -- thank you for all your detailed research! – Clyde Feb 22 '12 at 14:51
    
@Clyde It's a bummer for sure. If you'd like to talk more about this and experiment with some other workarounds we can talk in chat or get my email from my profile. Let us know how it goes if nothing else. – one.beat.consumer Feb 22 '12 at 17:47

Edit I'm not sure this is actually possible, and this is why:

The assumption is that a foreign key references a primary key. What you've got is two fields which are both acting as primary keys of vwContact, but depending on which object you ask it's a different field that's the primary key. You can only have one primary key at once, and although you can have a compound primary key you can't do primary key things with only half of it - you have to have a compound foreign key with which to reference it.

This is why Entity Framework doesn't have a way to specify the mapping column on the target side, because it has to use the primary key.

Now, you can layer some more objects on top of the EF entities to do some manual lookup and simulate the navigation properties, but I don't think you can actually get EF to do what you want because SQL itself won't do what you want - the rule is one primary key per table, and it's not negotiable.

From what you said about your database structure, it may be possible for you to write a migration script which can give the contact entities a consistent primary key and update everything else to refer to them with that single primary key rather than the two systems resulting from the legacy data, as you can of course do joins on any fields you like. I don't think you're going to get a seamlessly functional EF model without changing your database though.

Original Answer That Won't Work

So, vwContact contains a key KeyField which is referenced by many SomeObjects and another key LegacyKeyField which is referenced by many LegacyObjects.

I think this is how you have to approach this:

Give vwContact navigation properties for SomeObject and LegacyObject collections:

public virtual ICollection<SomeObject> SomeObjects { get; set; }
public virtual ICollection<LegacyObject> LegacyObjects { get; set; }

Give those navigation properties foreign keys to use:

modelBuilder.Entity<vwContact>()
    .HasMany(c => c.SomeObjects)
    .WithRequired(s => s.Contact)
    .HasForeignKey(c => c.KeyField);
modelBuilder.Entity<vwContact>()
    .HasMany(c => c.LegacyObjects)
    .WithRequired(l => l.Contact)
    .HasForeignKey(c => c.LegacyKeyField);

The trouble is I would guess you've already tried this and it didn't work, in which case I can't offer you much else as I've not done a huge amount of this kind of thing (our database is much closer to the kinds of thing EF expects so we've had to do relatively minimal mapping overrides, usually with many-to-many relationships).

As for your two calls to HasKey on vwContact, they can't both be the definitive key for the object, so it's either a compound key which features both of them, or pick one, or there's another field you haven't mentioned which is the real primary key. From here it's not really possible to say what the right option there is.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll have to test this out -- I've always set up the relationship from the 'one' side of the one-to-many relationship. I'm not sure that 'HasForeignKey' makes a lot of sense on the many side of the relationship but we can see. This specification is strange in that it never specifies which field on the SomeObject object is the foreign key reference. – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 16:09
    
OK, this isn't working -- the HasForeignKey is still working against the SomeObject/LegacyObject table, not the vwContact. – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 16:17
    
What I'm really wishing I were seeing is something like this: modelBuilder.Entity<LegacyObject>().HasRequired(x => x.Contact).WithMany(y => LegacyObjectCollection).HasForeignKey(x => x.ContactId).UsesKeyField(y => LegacyKeyField); – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 16:20
    
Okay I've looked into this a bit more and I don't think it's going to work at all. I'm going to update the answer to explain why I think that. – Matthew Walton Feb 15 '12 at 16:34
    
Hi Matthew thanks for the update. I will quibble with part of that, though -- SQL does in fact allow the multiple keys. If I create the schema with tables and not a view, I can set up the foreign keys to reference either field by setting the legacy key as a unique column. – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 16:48

You should be able to do this with two different objects to represent the Contact view.

public class vwContact
{
  public int KeyField { get; set; }
  public string LegacyKeyField { get; set; }
}

public class vwLegacyContact
{
  public int KeyField { get; set; }
  public string LegacyKeyField { get; set; }
}

public class SomeObject
{
  public virtual vwContact Contact { get; set; }
  public int ContactId { get; set; } //references vwContact.KeyField
}

public class LegacyObject
{
  public virtual vwLegacyContact Contact { get; set; }
  public string ContactId { get; set; } //references vwLegacyContact.LegacyKeyField
}

ModelCreatingFunction(modelBuilder)
{
  // can't set both of these, right?
  modelBuilder.Entity<vwContact>().HasKey(x => x.KeyField);
  modelBuilder.Entity<vwLegacyContact>().HasKey(x => x.LegacyKeyField);

  // The rest of your configuration
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. I actually got an error having two different objects mapped to the same database table. However it leads me to the idea that I can just have a 2nd view that's identical for the first, but in EF I'll now have 2 objects, with different keys. That's definitely not ideal, but at least it's not a "you're completely hosed" situation. I'm going to try one.beat.consumer's idea below and if it doesn't pan out, this will be my fallback. – Clyde Feb 15 '12 at 20:54
    
@Clyde unfortunately that's what it's looking like - 2nd view in schema, and an EF entity mapped to each one. Like you said, not ideal, but a low immpact, low risk alternative to modding existing schema or writing quirky EF tricks. – one.beat.consumer Feb 22 '12 at 7:10

I have tried everything that you can imagine, and found that most solutions won't work in this version of EF... maybe in future versions it supports referencing another entity by using an unique field, but this is not the case now. I also found two solutions that work, but they are more of a workaround than solutions.

I tried all of the following things, that didn't work:

  • Mapping two entities to the same table: this is not allowed in EF4.
  • Inheriting from a base that has no key definitions: all root classes must have keys, so that inherited classes share this common key... that is how inheritance works in EF4.
  • Inheriting from base class that defines all fields, including keys, and then use modelBuilder to tell wich base-properties are keys of the derived types: this doesn't work, because the methos HasKey, Property and others that take members as parameters, must reference members of the class itself... referencing properties of a base class is not allowed. This cannot be done: modelBuilder.HasKey<MyClass>(x => x.BaseKeyField)

The two things that I did that worked:

  • Without DB changes: Map to the table that is source of the view in question... that is, if vwContact is a view to Contacts table, then you can map a class to Contacts, and use it by setting the key to the KeyField, and another class mapping to the vwContacts view, with the key being LegacyKeyField. In the class Contacts, the LegacyKeyField must exist, and you will have to manage this manually, when using the Contacts class. Also, when using the class vwContacts you will have to manually manage the KeyField, unless it is an autoincrement field in the DB, in this case, you must remove the property from vwContacts class.

  • Changing DB: Create another view, just like the vwContacts, say vwContactsLegacy, and map it to a class in wich the key is the LegacyKeyField, and map vwContacts to the original view, using KeyField as the key. All limitations from the first case also applies: the vwContacts must have the LegacyKeyField, managed manually. And the vwContactsLegacy, must have the KetField if it is not autoincrement idenitity, otherwise it must not be defined.

There are some limitations:

As I said, these solutions are work-arounds... not real solutions, there are some serious implications, that may even make them undesirable:

  • EF does not know that you are mapping two classes to the same thing. So when you update one thing, the other one could be changed or not, it depends if the objects is cached or not. Also, you could have two objects at the same time, that represents the same thing on the backing storage, so say you load a vwContact and also a vwContactLegacy, changes both, and then try to save both... you will have to care about this yourself.

  • You will have to manage one of the keys manually. If you are using vwContacts class, the KeyFieldLegacy is there, and you must fill it. If you want to create a vwContacts, and associate is with a LegacyObject, then you need to create the reference manually, because LegacyObject takes a vwContactsLegacy, not a vwContacts... you will have to create the reference by setting the ContactId field.

I hope that this is more of a help than a disillusion, EF is a powerfull toy, but it is far from perfect... though I think it's going to get much better in the next versions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Miguel, your answer is very helpful. Your second workaround is much like my suggestion, and I think the best one in his scenario given that he needs to minimize the changes to the DB schema. It is the least invasive and least risky from my perspective. Thoughts? – one.beat.consumer Feb 21 '12 at 20:24
1  
I think that the Entity Framework 4 in its current state is not the right tool do work with legacy databases... but if he needs to use EF4 at all costs, then I would just create another view, and use it as an entity, if that view is complicated enough, otherwise if the view is just a simple select over one single table, then I'd just use the original table as an entity. – Miguel Angelo Feb 22 '12 at 0:40
    
+1 - I think we're saying the exact same thing. Thanks Miguel. – one.beat.consumer Feb 22 '12 at 1:38

I think this may be possible using extension methods, although not directly through EF as @Matthew Walton mentioned in his edit above.

However, with extension methods, you can specify what to do behind the scenes, and have a simple call to it.

public class LegacyObject
{
    public virtual vwContact Contact { get; set; }
    public string ContactId { get; set; } //references vwContact.LegacyKeyField
}

public class LegacyObjectExtensions
{
    public static vwContact Contacts(this LegacyObject legacyObject)
    {
        var dbContext = new LegacyDbContext();
        var contacts = from o in legacyObject
                       join c in dbContext.vwContact
                           on o.ContactId == c.LegacyKeyField
                       select c;

        return contacts;
    }
}

and

public class SomeObject
{
    public virtual vwContact Contact { get; set; }
    public int ContactId { get; set; } //references vwContact.KeyField
}

public class SomeObjectExtensions
{
    public static vwContact Contacts(this SomeObject someObject)
    {
        var dbContext = new LegacyDbContext();
        var contacts = from o in someObject
                       join c in dbContext.vwContact
                           on o.ContactId == c.KeyField
                       select c;

        return contacts;
    }
}

Then to use you can simply do like this:

var legacyContacts = legacyObject.Contacts();
var someContacts = someObject.Contacts();
share|improve this answer

Sometimes it makes more sense to map it from the other end of the relationship, in your case:

modelBuilder.Entity<LegacyObject>().HasRequired(x => x.Contact).WithMany().HasForeignKey(u => u.LegacyKeyField);

however this will require that u.LegacyKeyField is marked as a primary key.

And then I'll give my two cents:

if the Legacy db is using LegacyKeyField, then perhaps the legacy db will be read only. In this case we can create two separate contexts Legacy and Non-legacy and map them accordingly. This can potentially become a bit messy as you'd have to remember which object comes from which context. But then again, nothing stops you from adding the same EF code first object into 2 different contexts

Another solution is to use views with ContactId added for all other legacy tables and map them into one context. This will tax performance for the sake of having cleaner context objects, but this can be counteracted on sql side: indexed views, materialized views, stored procs, etc. So than LEGACY_OBJECT becomes VW_LEGACY OBJECT with CONTACT.ContactId brought over, then:

modelBuilder.Entity<LegacyObject>().ToTable("VW_LEGACY_OBJECT"); 
modelBuilder.Entity<LegacyObject>().HasRequired(x => x.Contact).WithMany().HasForeignKey(u => u.ContactId);

I personally would go with creating "mapper views" with CustomerId on legacy tables, as it's cleaner from c# layer perspective and you can make those views look like real tables. It is also difficult to suggest a solution without knowing what exactly is the scenario that you have a problem with: querying, loading, saving, etc.

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