Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a benefit in mocking a concrete class vs an interface?

sample:

In my CustomerService class I call the CustomerDataProvider like

customerDataProvider.GetCustomers();

customerDataProvider could also be of type ICustomerDataProvider. When I want to test the logic inside the CustomerService only without going to the database then I have to mock the customerDataProvider object of type ICustomerDataProvider OR CustomerDataProvider.

Where is the advantage in mocking one type over the other?

share|improve this question
    
It kind of depends on why you need to mock it in the first place... could you describe your test scenario in a little more detail? Without it this is a subjective question. –  Cory Jan 25 '12 at 21:08
    
sample is attached! :) –  Pascal Jan 25 '12 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The primary benefit to mocking an interface rather than a class is that it's simpler - interfaces can't be sealed/final, they can't have methods you can't override, and they can't have unusual construction semantics. Mocking libraries can take away a lot of the headaches of mocking classes, but they can't make up for untestable design.

The primary reason to mock classes instead of interfaces is: sometimes you only have a class. If you're doing your own design and implementation then you can make the choice to build one or the other. If you're consuming someone else's library, you have to deal with what it provides.

share|improve this answer
    
"...you have to deal with what it provides" a class always exists an interface not. So no benefit? –  Pascal Jan 26 '12 at 7:57
    
Definitely benefits from an implementation point of view. Edited. –  arootbeer Jan 26 '12 at 19:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.