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Just pesuocode but this is essentially what I would like to do.

Array=("1" "Linux" "Test system"
       "2" "Windows" "Workstation"
       "3" "Windows" "Workstation")


echo "number " ${array[search "$1"]} "is a" ${array[search "$1" +1]} ${array[search "$1" +2])}

Is this possible with bash? I could only find info on search and replace. I didn't see anything That would return and index.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like that should work:

search() {
    local i=1;
    for str in "${array[@]}"; do
        if [ "$str" = "$1" ]; then
            echo $i
            return
        else
            ((i++))
        fi
    done
    echo "-1"
}

While looping over the array to find the index is certainly possible, this alternative solution with an associative array is more practical:

array=([1,os]="Linux"   [1,type]="Test System"
       [2,os]="Windows" [2,type]="Work Station"
       [3,os]="Windows" [3,type]="Work Station")

echo "number $1 is a ${array[$1,os]} ${array[$1,type]}"
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Cool thanks I didn't know I could form an array like that. –  matt Jan 26 '12 at 0:23
6  
you fail to mention that associative arrays are bash 4 only feature –  Sorin Jan 26 '12 at 9:34

You could modify this example from this link to return an index without much trouble:

# Check if a value exists in an array
# @param $1 mixed  Needle  
# @param $2 array  Haystack
# @return  Success (0) if value exists, Failure (1) otherwise
# Usage: in_array "$needle" "${haystack[@]}"
# See: http://fvue.nl/wiki/Bash:_Check_if_array_element_exists
in_array() {
    local hay needle=$1
    shift
    for hay; do
        [[ $hay == $needle ]] && return 0
    done
    return 1
}
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-1 for the link returning 403 and the answer being totally "obscure" –  Sorin Jan 25 '12 at 22:21
1  
@Sorin I'm not getting a 403 with that link. –  Dan Fego Jan 25 '12 at 22:49
    
@Dan Fego: I would attach a screenshot if I could. However, the answer is still totally obscure, and lacking even the basic information. –  Sorin Jan 25 '12 at 22:55
    
You're probably right. But the OP should try something (like a simple internet search) before asking, too. –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '12 at 23:17
2  
@Sorin Obscure? Reads very clearly to me. –  Charles Duffy Jun 11 '12 at 2:03

Based on the Carl Norum answer :

Array=("1" "Linux" "Test system"
       "2" "Windows" "Workstation"
       "3" "Windows" "Workstation")


function index() {
    local  needle=$1
    declare -a argAry=("${!2}")

    for (( i=0;i < ${#argAry[@]}; i++)); do
        x="${argAry[$i]}"
        [ "$needle" == "$x" ] && echo $i && return 0
    done
    return 1
}


for ((nr=1;nr <=3; nr++)); do
    echo $nr ${Array[`index $nr Array[@]`]} "is a" ${Array[((`index $nr Array[@]`+1))]} ${Array[((`index $nr Array[@]` +2))]}
done

See also: Passing arrays as parameters in bash, In array operator in bash

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This returns 0 both for non-matches and match to first element. The user has to check the exit code to tell the difference. –  Daniel Mar 1 '12 at 10:05

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