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What am I doing wrong here?

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    unsigned char buff[3];

    buff[0] = 0x00;
    buff[1] = 0x11;
    buff[2] = 0x00;
    buff[3] = 0x00;

    int var = (buff[0]<<24)|buff[1]|buff[2]|buff[3];
    printf ("%u\n", var);

    return 0;
}

And the result shown below,

$./a.out
17
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 25 '12 at 22:05

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

2  
What should the result be? –  ChrisF Jan 25 '12 at 22:05
    
Surely you meant to write (buff[0]<<24)|(buff[1]<<16)|(buff[2]<<8)|buff[3]? –  ruakh Jan 25 '12 at 22:08
2  
buff[3] is too far for an array declared with size 3 –  sidyll Jan 25 '12 at 22:08
    
The output is somewhat unexpected, but you should provide a program that doesn't write off end of buffer and try it again. –  Kevin Hsu Jan 26 '12 at 1:40
    
You are accessing the array out-of-bounds and thereby invoking undefined behavior. Thus the compiler behaves correctly, by giving you a completely random result in return. –  Lundin Jan 27 '12 at 7:40

5 Answers 5

Hmm. char[3] is an array of 3 chars, with legal indices 0, 1, and 2.

What you refer to as buff[3] must be something completely different, probably even re-initialized after the buff[3] = 0x00 assignment. You could be getting a SIGSEGV or a GPF instead of 17.

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+1 for noticing the array size. I initially missed it! –  Edwin Buck Jan 25 '12 at 22:16

(buff[0]<<24) is evaluted to 0

buff[1] is evaluated to 0x11 (17 decimal)

buff[2] is evaluated to 0

buff[3] is evaluated to 0

0 | 17 | 0 | 0 == 17
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You probably want:

int var = (buff[0]<<24)|(buff[1]<<16)|(buff[2]<<8)|buff[3];

if your buffer is big-endian or

int var = buff[0]|(buff[1]<<8)|(buff[2]<<16)|(buff[3]<<24);

if your buffer is little-endian.

Also, your array is too little - the number you specify in the brackets when you declare an array is the size of the array, not the maximum index. It has to be unsigned char buff[4];.

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--- edited in response to 9000's observation ---

In addition to the shifting mentioned below, one should allocate an array large enough to cover all the indices one uses

unsigned char buff[4];

My results (entire program copied below) are 1116160, which corresponds to 0x00110000

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    unsigned char buff[4];

    buff[0] = 0x00;
    buff[1] = 0x11;
    buff[2] = 0x00;
    buff[3] = 0x00;

    int var = (buff[0]<<24)|(buff[1]<<16)|(buff[2]<<8)|buff[3];
    printf ("%u\n", var);

    return 0;
}

Your results might differ slightly depending on they byte order of your machine.

--- original post follows ---

The last three bytes are overlaying each other. Odds are you simply forgot to shift them into place.

Assuming that's a good assumption, your code should look more like

int var = (buff[0]<<24)|(buff[1]<<16)|(buff[2]<<8)|buff[3];
printf ("%u\n", var);

return 0;
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As you haven't given an indication of what the result should be, I'll go out on a limb and guess that this is the problem:

int var = (buff[0]<<24)|buff[1]|buff[2]|buff[3];

should be

int var = (buff[0]<<24)|(buff[0]<<16)|(buff[0]<<8)|buff[3];
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