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Is there a plugin-less way of retrieving query string values via jQuery (or without)?

If so, how? If not, is there a plugin which can do so?

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locked by animuson Jul 25 at 19:35

This question's answer is a collaborative effort: if you see something that can be improved, just edit to improve it! No additional answers can be added here

69  
A plain javascript solution without RegEx: css-tricks.com/snippets/javascript/get-url-variables –  Lorenzo Polidori Oct 29 '12 at 14:50
6  
Although the top solution to the question deserves its popularity because of its excellent observation that jQuery is not needed, its method of creating new regular expressions and re-parsing the query string for every parameter desired is extremely inefficient. Far more efficient (and versatile) solutions have been in existence for a long time, for example within this article reprinted here: htmlgoodies.com/beyond/javascript/article.php/11877_3755006_3/… –  Joseph Myers May 14 '13 at 6:00
1  
possible duplicate of JavaScript query string –  Cupcake Jul 31 '13 at 23:09
4  
Joseph, the "excellent observation that jQuery is not needed"? Of course it's not needed. Everything jQuery does, it does using JavaScript. People don't use jQuery because it does stuff that JavaScript can't do. The point of jQuery is convenience. –  user2407309 May 30 at 1:12

74 Answers 74

up vote 3048 down vote accepted

You don't need jQuery for that purpose. You can use just some pure JavaScript:

function getParameterByName(name) {
    name = name.replace(/[\[]/, "\\[").replace(/[\]]/, "\\]");
    var regex = new RegExp("[\\?&]" + name + "=([^&#]*)"),
        results = regex.exec(location.search);
    return results == null ? "" : decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
}

Usage:

var prodId = getParameterByName('prodId');
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413  
No one's saying it can't be done with pure Javascript. If you're already using jQuery, and jQuery has a function to do this, then it would make sense to use jQuery instead of reinventing the wheel with a new function. –  Cerin Jan 31 '11 at 22:05
59  
How does this function handle http://www.mysite.com/index.php?x=x1&x=x2&x=x3 The value of field x is ambiguous. –  dpp Jul 9 '11 at 6:34
62  
this doesn't handle parameters that aren't followed by equals sign, which is perfectly legal. for example, ?a=1&b=2&c&d. you'd want to return empty string for c, and undefined for something that isn't there at all (say, e) –  Kip Sep 22 '11 at 19:42
23  
this also doesn't handle multi-valued keys, which are also perfectly legal. –  hurrymaplelad Oct 7 '11 at 8:47
106  
There are probably better answers in this thread. People should sometimes consider scrolling down and don't blindly +1 for currently accepted answer. –  Pavel Hodek Apr 29 '12 at 19:47

Some of the solutions posted here are inefficient. Repeating the regular expression search every time the script needs to access a parameter is completely unnecessary, one single function to split up the parameters into an associative-array style object is enough. If you're not working with the HTML 5 History API, this is only necessary once per page load. The other suggestions here also fail to decode the URL correctly.

var urlParams;
(window.onpopstate = function () {
    var match,
        pl     = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
        search = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
        decode = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(pl, " ")); },
        query  = window.location.search.substring(1);

    urlParams = {};
    while (match = search.exec(query))
       urlParams[decode(match[1])] = decode(match[2]);
})();

Example querystring:

?i=main&mode=front&sid=de8d49b78a85a322c4155015fdce22c4&enc=+Hello%20&empty

Result:

urlParams = {
    enc: " Hello ",
    i: "main",
    mode: "front",
    sid: "de8d49b78a85a322c4155015fdce22c4",
    empty: ""
}

alert(urlParams["mode"]);
// -> "front"

alert("empty" in urlParams);
// -> true

This could easily be improved upon to handle array-style query strings too. An example of this is here, but since array-style parameters aren't defined in RFC 3986 I won't pollute this answer with the source code. For those interested in a "polluted" version, look at campbeln's answer below.

Also, as pointed out in the comments, ; is a legal delimiter for key=value pairs. It would require a more complicated regex to handle ; or &, which I think is unnecessary because it's rare that ; is used and I would say even more unlikely that both would be used. If you need to support ; instead of &, just swap them in the regex.


If you're using a server-side preprocessing language, you might want to use its native JSON functions to do the heavy lifting for you. For example, in PHP you can write:

<script>var urlParams = <?php echo json_encode($_GET, JSON_HEX_TAG);?>;</script>

Much simpler!

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8  
if you're doing a heavily ajax'd app, then you may be using the hash(#) to "enable the back button"... in that case the querystring would change all the time (see how facebook does it)... though these solutions ignore things that come after the # anways... –  Nick Franceschina Jul 14 '10 at 0:12
77  
@Nick: Anything after the hash resides in the window.location.hash property, which is separate from the window.location.search property. If the hash changes, it doesn't affect the querystring at all. –  Andy E Jul 14 '10 at 9:20
17  
Don't forget the ; is a legal delimiter for GET key=value pairs. It is rare, but it takes 5 seconds to implement. –  alex Nov 15 '10 at 11:26
17  
-1 for creating an XSS vulnerability by using json_encode without JSON_HEX_TAG. –  qerub Feb 15 '12 at 15:15
6  
For those of us using a fairly strict setup of JSHint swap the while(match = search.exec(query)) with while((match = search.exec(query)) !== null) –  craigts Sep 4 '13 at 19:26

Without jQuery

var qs = (function(a) {
    if (a == "") return {};
    var b = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
    {
        var p=a[i].split('=');
        if (p.length != 2) continue;
        b[p[0]] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
    }
    return b;
})(window.location.search.substr(1).split('&'));

With an URL like ?topic=123&name=query+string, the following will return:

qs["topic"];    // 123
qs["name"];     // query string
qs["nothere"];  // undefined (object)

Google method

Tearing Google's code I found the method they use: getUrlParameters

function (b) {
    var c = typeof b === "undefined";
    if (a !== h && c) return a;
    for (var d = {}, b = b || k[B][vb], e = b[p]("?"), f = b[p]("#"), b = (f === -1 ? b[Ya](e + 1) : [b[Ya](e + 1, f - e - 1), "&", b[Ya](f + 1)][K](""))[z]("&"), e = i.dd ? ia : unescape, f = 0, g = b[w]; f < g; ++f) {
        var l = b[f][p]("=");
        if (l !== -1) {
            var q = b[f][I](0, l),
                l = b[f][I](l + 1),
                l = l[Ca](/\+/g, " ");
            try {
                d[q] = e(l)
            } catch (A) {}
        }
    }
    c && (a = d);
    return d
}

It is obfuscated, but it is understandable.

They start to look for parameters on the url from ? and also from the hash #. Then for each parameter they split in the equal sign b[f][p]("=") (which looks like indexOf, they use the position of the char to get the key/value). Having it split they check whether the parameter has a value or not, if it has they store the value of d, if not it just continue.

In the end the object d is returned, handling escaping and the + sign. This object is just like mine, it has the same behavior.


My method as a jQuery plugin

(function($) {
    $.QueryString = (function(a) {
        if (a == "") return {};
        var b = {};
        for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
        {
            var p=a[i].split('=');
            if (p.length != 2) continue;
            b[p[0]] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
        }
        return b;
    })(window.location.search.substr(1).split('&'))
})(jQuery);

Usage

$.QueryString["param"]

Performance test (split method against regex method) (jsPerf)

Preparation code: methods declaration

Split test code

var qs = window.GetQueryString(query);

var search = qs["q"];
var value = qs["value"];
var undef = qs["undefinedstring"];

Regex test code

var search = window.getParameterByName("q");
var value = window.getParameterByName("value");
var undef = window.getParameterByName("undefinedstring");

Testing in Firefox 4.0 x86 on Windows Server 2008 R2 / 7 x64

  • Split method: 144,780 ±2.17% fastest
  • Regex method: 13,891 ±0.85% | 90% slower
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6  
@Andy: I've posted an improved version. What do you think of it? –  BrunoLM Oct 16 '10 at 1:51
21  
Curious why you'd make this a jQuery plugin when it doesn't have any jQuery specific code? –  zachleat Feb 23 '11 at 13:55
20  
@zachleat if you don't have a framework your functions will just get spread across your code. If you extend jQuery you will have a scope for your functions, it won't be floating around somewhere in your code. I think that is the only reason. –  BrunoLM Feb 23 '11 at 13:57
3  
Here is the jQuery version tweaked to pass JSLint (at least the semi-moving target of JSLint.com on 2011-06-15). Mostly just moving things around to appease The Crockford. –  patridge Jun 15 '11 at 17:48
3  
How does this function handle http://www.mysite.com/index.php?x=x1&x=x2&x=x3 The value of field x is ambiguous. –  dpp Jul 9 '11 at 6:35

Improved version of Artem Barger's answer:

function getParameterByName(name) {
    var match = RegExp('[?&]' + name + '=([^&]*)').exec(window.location.search);
    return match && decodeURIComponent(match[1].replace(/\+/g, ' '));
}

For more information on improvement see: http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/bujs-1-getparameterbyname/

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18  
If you wanted to shorten it a bit more, you could do away with the ternary conditional and replace it with a bit of short-circuitry on that last line - return match && decodeURIComponent(match[1].replace(/\+/g, ' '));. –  Andy E Mar 1 '11 at 21:57
2  
I would use the new prefix when creating the regex: var match = new RegExp('... –  patrickberkeley Jun 10 at 15:03

Just another recommendation. The plugin Purl allows to retrieve all parts of URL, including anchor, host, etc.

It can be used with or without jQuery.

Usage is very simple and cool:

var url = $.url('http://allmarkedup.com/folder/dir/index.html?item=value'); // jQuery version
var url = purl('http://allmarkedup.com/folder/dir/index.html?item=value'); // plain JS version
url.attr('protocol'); // returns 'http'
url.attr('path'); // returns '/folder/dir/index.html'
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141  
Thanks for the answer. A blessed relief in a page of sadness. –  frabcus Feb 5 '13 at 23:11
3  
@frabcus yes, a page of sadness it is indeed, thanks alfatek –  necromancer Aug 25 '13 at 20:07
2  
This URL parser is ridiculously fat in file size.. –  vsync Jan 21 at 14:25
3  
URL parsing isn't simple. –  dimadima Mar 1 at 4:17

Roshambo on snipplr.com has a really hot and simple script to achieve this described in Get URL Parameters with jQuery | Improved. With his script you also easily get to pull out just the parameters you want.

Here's the gist:

$.urlParam = function(name, url) {
    if (!url) {
     url = window.location.href;
    }
    var results = new RegExp('[\\?&]' + name + '=([^&#]*)').exec(url);
    if (!results) { 
        return 0; 
    }
    return results[1] || 0;
}

Then just get your parameters from the query string.

So if the URL/query string was xyz.com/index.html?lang=de.

Just call var langval = $.urlParam('lang');, and you've got it.

UZBEKJON has a great blog post on this as well, Get URL parameters & values with jQuery.

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10  
with jQuery seems to mean to namespace the function to the jQuery object. Also, why is the invalid value 0? Sure, I could use strict equality check, but shouldn't it be null ? –  alex Jun 17 '12 at 1:34

If you're using jQuery, you can use a library, such as jQuery BBQ: Back Button & Query Library.

...jQuery BBQ provides a full .deparam() method, along with both hash state management, and fragment / query string parse and merge utility methods.

If you want to just use plain JavaScript, you could use...

var getParamValue = (function() {
    var params;
    var resetParams = function() {
            var query = window.location.search;
            var regex = /[?&;](.+?)=([^&;]+)/g;
            var match;

            params = {};

            if (query) {
                while (match = regex.exec(query)) {
                    params[match[1]] = decodeURIComponent(match[2]);
                }
            }    
        };

    window.addEventListener
    && window.addEventListener('popstate', resetParams);

    resetParams();

    return function(param) {
        return params.hasOwnProperty(param) ? params[param] : null;
    }

})();​

Because of the new HTML History API and specifically history.pushState() and history.replaceState(), the URL can change which will invalidate the cache of parameters and their values.

This version will update its internal cache of parameters each time the history changes.

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Here's my stab at making Andy E's excellent solution into a full fledged jQuery plugin:

;(function ($) {
    $.extend({      
        getQueryString: function (name) {           
            function parseParams() {
                var params = {},
                    e,
                    a = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
                    r = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
                    d = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(a, " ")); },
                    q = window.location.search.substring(1);

                while (e = r.exec(q))
                    params[d(e[1])] = d(e[2]);

                return params;
            }

            if (!this.queryStringParams)
                this.queryStringParams = parseParams(); 

            return this.queryStringParams[name];
        }
    });
})(jQuery);

The syntax is:

var someVar = $.getQueryString('myParam');

Best of both worlds!

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Why not just use 2 splits ?

function get(n) {
      var half = location.search.split(n + '=')[1];
      return half !== undefined ? decodeURIComponent(half.split('&')[0]) : null;
  }

I was reading all previous and more complete answer. But I think that is the simplest and faster method. You can check in this jsPerf benchmark

To solve the problem in Rup's comment, add a conditional split by changing the first line to the two below. But absolute accuracy means it's now slower than regexp (see jsPerf).

function get(n) {
    var half = location.search.split('&' + n + '=')[1];
    if (!half) half = location.search.split('?' + n + '=')[1];
    return half !== undefined ? decodeURIComponent(half.split('&')[0]) : null;
}

So if you know you won't run into Rup's counter-case, this wins. Otherwise, regexp.

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2  
Very neat! It won't work though if you have an earlier value with a key name that ends with the one you want, e.g. get('value') on http://the-url?oldvalue=1&value=2. –  Rup Sep 4 '12 at 11:46

If you're doing more URL manipulation than simply parsing the querystring, you may find URI.js helpful. It is a library for manipulating URLs - and comes with all the bells and whistles. (Sorry for self-advertising here)

to convert your querystring into a map:

var data = URI('?foo=bar&bar=baz&foo=world').query(true);
data == {
  "foo": ["bar", "world"],
  "bar": "baz"
}

(URI.js also "fixes" bad querystrings like ?&foo&&bar=baz& to ?foo&bar=baz)

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I like Ryan Phelan's solution. But I don't see any point of extending jQuery for that? There is no usage of jQuery functionality.

On other hand I like the built-in function in Google Chrome: window.location.getParameter.

So why not to use this? Okay, other browsers don't have. So let's create this function if it does not exist:

if (!window.location.getParameter ) {
  window.location.getParameter = function(key) {
    function parseParams() {
        var params = {},
            e,
            a = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
            r = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
            d = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(a, " ")); },
            q = window.location.search.substring(1);

        while (e = r.exec(q))
            params[d(e[1])] = d(e[2]);

        return params;
    }

    if (!this.queryStringParams)
        this.queryStringParams = parseParams(); 

    return this.queryStringParams[key];
  };
}

This function is more or less from Ryan Phelan, but it is wrapped differently: clear name and no dependencies of other javascript libraries. More about this function on my blog.

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Keep it simple in plain javascript:

function qs(key) {
    var vars = [], hash;
    var hashes = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for(var i = 0; i < hashes.length; i++)
    {
        hash = hashes[i].split('=');
        vars.push(hash[0]);
        vars[hash[0]] = hash[1];
    }
    return vars[key];
}

Call it from anywhere in the JavaScript code:

var result = qs('someKey');
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Here is a fast way to get an object similar to the PHP $_GET array:

function get_query(){
    var url = location.href;
    var qs = url.substring(url.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for(var i = 0, result = {}; i < qs.length; i++){
        qs[i] = qs[i].split('=');
        result[qs[i][0]] = decodeURIComponent(qs[i][1]);
    }
    return result;
}

Usage:

var $_GET = get_query();

For the query string x=5&y&z=hello&x=6 this returns the object:

{
  x: "6",
  y: undefined,
  z: "hello"
}
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Use the following to get a query param value given a key name:

function getParam(key) 
  {
  // Find the key and everything up to the ampersand delimiter
  var value=RegExp(""+key+"[^&]+").exec(window.location.search);

  // Return the unescaped value minus everything starting from the equals sign or an empty string
  return unescape(!!value ? value.toString().replace(/^[^=]+./,"") : "");
  }
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These are all great answers, but I needed something a bit more robust, and thought you all might like to have what I created. It is a simple library method that does dissection and manipulation of url parameters. The static method has the following sub methods that can be called on the subject url:

  • getHost
  • getPath
  • getHash
  • setHash
  • getParams
  • getQuery
  • setParam
  • getParam
  • hasParam
  • removeParam

Example:

URLParser(url).getParam('myparam1')

var url = "http://www.test.com/folder/mypage.html?myparam1=1&myparam2=2#something";

function URLParser(u){
    var path="",query="",hash="",params;
    if(u.indexOf("#") > 0){
        hash = u.substr(u.indexOf("#") + 1);
        u = u.substr(0 , u.indexOf("#"));
    }
    if(u.indexOf("?") > 0){
        path = u.substr(0 , u.indexOf("?"));        
        query = u.substr(u.indexOf("?") + 1);
        params= query.split('&');
    }else
        path = u;
    return {
        getHost: function(){
            var hostexp = /\/\/([\w.-]*)/;
            var match = hostexp.exec(path);
            if (match != null && match.length > 1)
                return match[1];
            return "";
        },
        getPath: function(){
            var pathexp = /\/\/[\w.-]*(?:\/([^?]*))/;
            var match = pathexp.exec(path);
            if (match != null && match.length > 1)
                return match[1];
            return "";
        },
        getHash: function(){
            return hash;
        },
        getParams: function(){
            return params
        },
        getQuery: function(){
            return query;
        },
        setHash: function(value){
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(value.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + value;
            return path + query;
        },
        setParam: function(name, value){
            if(!params){
                params= new Array();
            }
            params.push(name + '=' + value);
            for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                if(query.length > 0)
                    query += "&";
                query += params[i];
            }
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(hash.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + hash;
            return path + query;
        },
        getParam: function(name){
            if(params){
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) == name)
                        return decodeURIComponent(pair[1]);
                }
            }
            console.log('Query variable %s not found', name);
        },
        hasParam: function(name){
            if(params){
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) == name)
                        return true;
                }
            }
            console.log('Query variable %s not found', name);
        },
        removeParam: function(name){
            query = "";
            if(params){
                var newparams = new Array();
                for (var i = 0;i < params.length;i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) != name)
                          newparams .push(params[i]);
                }
                params = newparams ;
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    if(query.length > 0)
                        query += "&";
                    query += params[i];
                }
            }
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(hash.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + hash;
            return path + query;
        },
    }
}


document.write("Host: " + URLParser(url).getHost() + '<br>');
document.write("Path: " + URLParser(url).getPath() + '<br>');
document.write("Query: " + URLParser(url).getQuery() + '<br>');
document.write("Hash: " + URLParser(url).getHash() + '<br>');
document.write("Params Array: " + URLParser(url).getParams() + '<br>');
document.write("Param: " + URLParser(url).getParam('myparam1') + '<br>');
document.write("Has Param: " + URLParser(url).hasParam('myparam1') + '<br>');

document.write(url + '<br>');

// Remove first param
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam1');
document.write(url + ' - Remove first param<br>');

// Add third param
url = URLParser(url).setParam('myparam3',3);
document.write(url + ' - Add third param<br>');

// Remove second param
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam2');
document.write(url + ' - Add third param<br>');

// Add hash 
url = URLParser(url).setHash('newhash');
document.write(url + ' - Set Hash<br>');

// Remove last param
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam3');
document.write(url + ' - Remove last param<br>');

// Remove a param that doesnt exist
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam3');
document.write(url + ' - Remove a param that doesnt exist<br>');

​
share

Code golf:

var a = location.search&&location.search.substr(1).replace(/\+/gi," ").split("&");
for (var i in a) {
    var s = a[i].split("=");
    a[i]  = a[unescape(s[0])] = unescape(s[1]);
}

Display it!

for (i in a) {
    document.write(i + ":" + a[i] + "<br/>");   
};

On my Mac: test.htm?i=can&has=cheezburger displays

0:can
1:cheezburger
i:can
has:cheezburger
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5  
I love your answer, especially how compact the script is, but you should probably be using decodeURIComponent. See xkr.us/articles/javascript/encode-compare and stackoverflow.com/questions/619323/… –  pluckyglen Aug 10 '11 at 1:08

I use regular expressions a lot but not for that.

It seems easier and more efficient to me to read the query string once in my application, and build an object from all the key/value pairs like:

var search = function() {
  var s = window.location.search.substr(1),
    p = s.split(/\&/), l = p.length, kv, r = {};
  if (l === 0) {return false;}
  while (l--) {
    kv = p[l].split(/\=/);
    r[kv[0]] = decodeURIComponent(kv[1] || '') || true;
  }
  return r;
}();

For an URL like http://domain.com?param1=val1&param2=val2 you can get their value later in your code as search.param1 and search.param2.

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function GET() {
        var data = [];
        for(x = 0; x < arguments.length; ++x)
            data.push(location.href.match(new RegExp("/\?".concat(arguments[x],"=","([^\n&]*)")))[1])
                return data;
    }


example:
data = GET("id","name","foo");
query string : ?id=3&name=jet&foo=b
returns:
    data[0] // 3
    data[1] // jet
    data[2] // b
or
    alert(GET("id")[0]) // return 3
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4  
This is an interesting approach, returning an array containing values from the specified parameters. It does have at least one issue - not correctly URL decoding the values, and it would need to URL encode the parameter names used in match too. It will function on simple query strings in its present form though. ps don't forget to use the var keyword when declaring variables in for statements. –  Andy E Jul 11 '10 at 8:28

Roshambo jQuery method wasn't taking care of decode URL

http://snipplr.com/view/26662/get-url-parameters-with-jquery--improved/

Just added that capability also while adding in the return statement

return decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " ")) || 0;

Now you can find the updated gist:

$.urlParam = function(name){
var results = new RegExp('[\\?&]' + name + '=([^&#]*)').exec(window.location.href);
if (!results) { return 0; }
return decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " ")) || 0;
}
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Doesn't have enough reputation for comment, sigh.

Here's my edit to this excellent answer - with added ability to parse query strings with keys without values.

var url = 'http://sb.com/reg/step1?param';
var qs = (function(a) {
    if (a == "") return {};
    var b = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
        var p=a[i].split('=', 2);
        if (p[1]) p[1] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
        b[p[0]] = p[1];
    }
    return b;
})((url.split('?'))[1].split('&'));

IMPORTANT! Parameter for that func in last line is different, it's just example how one can pass arbitrary url to it. You can use last line from Bruno answer to parse current url.

So what exactly changed? With url http://sb.com/reg/step1?param= results will be same. But with url http://sb.com/reg/step1?param Bruno solution returns object without keys, while mine returns object with key param and undefined value.

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From the MDN:

function loadPageVar (sVar) {
  return unescape(window.location.search.replace(new RegExp("^(?:.*[&\\?]" + escape(sVar).replace(/[\.\+\*]/g, "\\$&") + "(?:\\=([^&]*))?)?.*$", "i"), "$1"));
}

alert(loadPageVar("name"));
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tl;dr solution using vanilla JavaScript

To access different parts of url use location.(search|hash)

var queryDict = {}
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {queryDict[item.split("=")[0]] = item.split("=")[1]})
  • Handles empty keys correctly.
  • Overrides multi-keys with last value found.
"?a=1&b=2&c=3&d&e&a=5"
> queryDict
a: "5"
b: "2"
c: "3"
d: undefined
e: undefined

multi-valued keys

Simple key check (item in dict) ? dict.item.push(val) : dict.item = [val,]

var qd = {}
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {(item.split("=")[0] in qd) ? qd[item.split("=")[0]].push(item.split("=")[1]) : qd[item.split("=")[0]] = [item.split("=")[1],]})
  • Now returns arrays instead.
  • Access values by qd.key[index] or qd[key][index]
> qd
a: ["1", "5"]
b: ["2"]
c: ["3"]
d: [undefined]
e: [undefined]

> qd.a[1]    // "5"
> qd["a"][1] // "5"

encoded characters?

Enclose the item.split("=")[1] by decodeURIComponent(item.split("=")[1])

"?a=1&b=2&c=3&d&e&a=5&a=t%20e%20x%20t&e=http%3A%2F%2Fw3schools.com%2Fmy%20test.asp%3Fname%3Dståle%26car%3Dsaab"
> qd
a: ["1", "5", "t e x t"]
b: ["2"]
c: ["3"]
d: [undefined]
e: [undefined, "http://w3schools.com/my test.asp?name=ståle&car=saab"]
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1  
@PavelNikolov I think it would introduce difficulties getting sometimes an array and sometimes a value. You would have to check for it first, now you only check the length, because you will be using cycles for retrieving those values anyways. Also this was meant to be the easiest, but functional, solution here. –  Qwerty Jan 16 at 21:20
1  
Glad I looked at this post for an updated solution. Thanks for submitting this. It'll work across all browsers too! –  twig Jan 20 at 22:57
1  
Thanks. I wrapped decodeURIComponent() in a function that replaces plus signs with spaces, as shown by @AndyE. For one particular application, if there is no query (search) string, I want to fall back on getting parameters from the hash value instead, so I use a conditional (ternary) operator inside bracket notation, like this: location[location.search.length ? "search" : "hash"] –  Graham Hannington Aug 8 at 4:52

This is a function I created a while back and I'm quite happy with. It is not case sensitive - which is handy. Also, if the requested QS doesn't exist, it just returns an empty string.

I use a compressed version of this. I'm posting uncompressed for the novice types to better explain what's going on.

I'm sure this could be optimized or done differently to work faster, but it's always worked great for what I need.

Enjoy.

    function getQSP(sName, sURL) {
        var theItmToRtn = "";
        var theSrchStrg = location.search;
        if (sURL) theSrchStrg = sURL;

        var sOrig = theSrchStrg;

        theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg.toUpperCase();
        sName = sName.toUpperCase();
        theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg.replace("?", "&")
        theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg + "&";
        var theSrchToken = "&" + sName + "=";
        if (theSrchStrg.indexOf(theSrchToken) != -1) {
            var theSrchTokenLth = theSrchToken.length;
            var theSrchTokenLocStart = theSrchStrg.indexOf(theSrchToken) + theSrchTokenLth;
            var theLocOfNextAndSign = theSrchStrg.indexOf("&", theSrchTokenLocStart);
            theItmToRtn = unescape(sOrig.substring(theSrchTokenLocStart, theLocOfNextAndSign));
        }
        return unescape(theItmToRtn);
    }
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14  
you need to work on those var names –  ajax333221 May 25 '12 at 22:20

I like this one:

// get an array with all querystring values
// example: var valor = getUrlVars()["valor"];
function getUrlVars() {
    var vars = [], hash;
    var hashes = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for (var i = 0; i < hashes.length; i++) {
        hash = hashes[i].split('=');
        vars.push(hash[0]);
        vars[hash[0]] = hash[1];
    }
    return vars;
}

Works great for me.

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I'm gonna throw my hat in the ring - I needed an object from the query string, and I hate lots of code. may not be the most robust in the universe but it's just a few lines of code.

var q = {};
location.href.split('?')[1].split('&').forEach(function(i){
    q[i.split('=')[0]]=i.split('=')[1];
});

a URL like this.htm?hello=world&foo=bar will create:

{hello:'world', foo:'bar'}
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3  
Neat. According to Mozilla, though, forEach doesn't work on IE7 or 8 and I suspect that'll fall over if there's no query string at all. One minimal improvement that would cover more cases would be to decodeURIComponent the value as you store it - and arguably the key as well, but you're less likely to use odd strings in that. –  Rup Feb 15 '13 at 10:39
1  
Nice and simple. Doesn't handle array parameters nor ?a&b&c but this is really very readable (and incidentally similar to my first idea). Also the split is redundant but I've got bigger performance fish to fry than splitting a 10 character string twice. –  cod3monk3y Feb 25 at 22:44

I developed a small library using techniques listed here to create an easy to use, drop-in solution to anyones troubles; It can be found here:

https://github.com/Nijikokun/query-js

Usage

Fetching specific parameter/key:

query.get('param');

Using the builder to fetch the entire object:

var storage = query.build();
console.log(storage.param);

and tons more... check the github link for more examples.

Features

  1. Caching on both decoding and parameters
  2. Supports hash query strings #hello?page=3
  3. Supports passing custom queries
  4. Supports Array / Object Parameters user[]="jim"&user[]="bob"
  5. Supports empty management &&
  6. Supports declaration parameters without values name&hello="world"
  7. Supports repeated parameters param=1&param=2
  8. Clean, compact, and readable source 4kb
  9. AMD, Require, Node support
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http://someurl.com?key=value&keynovalue&keyemptyvalue=&&keynovalue=nowhasvalue#somehash
  • Regular key/value pair (?param=value)
  • Keys w/o value (?param : no equal sign or value)
  • Keys w/ empty value (?param= : equal sign, but no value to right of equal sign)
  • Repeated Keys (?param=1&param=2)
  • Removes Empty Keys (?&& : no key or value)

Code:

  • var queryString = window.location.search || '';
    var keyValPairs = [];
    var params      = {};
    queryString     = queryString.substr(1);
    
    if (queryString.length)
    {
       keyValPairs = queryString.split('&');
       for (pairNum in keyValPairs)
       {
          var key = keyValPairs[pairNum].split('=')[0];
          if (!key.length) continue;
          if (typeof params[key] === 'undefined')
             params[key] = [];
          params[key].push(keyValPairs[pairNum].split('=')[1]);
       }
    }
    

How to Call:

  • params['key'];  // returns an array of values (1..n)
    

Output:

  • key            ["value"]
    keyemptyvalue  [""]
    keynovalue     [undefined, "nowhasvalue"]
    
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function GetQueryStringParams(sParam)
{
    var sPageURL = window.location.search.substring(1);
    var sURLVariables = sPageURL.split('&');

    for (var i = 0; i < sURLVariables.length; i++)
    {
        var sParameterName = sURLVariables[i].split('=');
        if (sParameterName[0] == sParam)
        {
            return sParameterName[1];
        }
    }
}​

And this is how you can use this function assuming the URL is

http://dummy.com/?stringtext=jquery&stringword=jquerybyexample

var tech = GetQueryStringParams('stringtext');
var blog = GetQueryStringParams('stringword');
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We've just released arg.js, a project aimed at solving this problem once and for all. It's traditionally been so difficult but now you can do:

var name = Arg.get("name");

or getting the whole lot:

var params = Arg.all();

and if you care about the difference between ?query=true and #hash=true then you can use the Arg.query() and Arg.hash() methods.

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One line code to get Query

var value = location.search.match(new RegExp(key + "=(.*?)($|\&)", "i"))[1];
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3  
Triggers error if the key doesn't exist, try this maybe? (location.search.match(new RegExp('kiosk_modeasdf' + "=(.*?)($|\&)", "i")) || [])[1] –  Brad Koch Jan 28 '13 at 20:51

protected by Community Oct 23 '11 at 15:27

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