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Is there a plugin-less way of retrieving query string values via jQuery (or without)?

If so, how? If not, is there a plugin which can do so?

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locked by animuson Jul 25 '14 at 19:35

This question's answers are a collaborative effort: if you see something that can be improved, just edit the answer to improve it! No additional answers can be added here

    
I use the plugin getUrlParam described in jQuery-Plugin – getUrlParam (version 2)‌​. – coma May 23 '09 at 8:19
69  
A plain javascript solution without RegEx: css-tricks.com/snippets/javascript/get-url-variables – Lorenzo Polidori Oct 29 '12 at 14:50
6  
Although the top solution to the question deserves its popularity because of its excellent observation that jQuery is not needed, its method of creating new regular expressions and re-parsing the query string for every parameter desired is extremely inefficient. Far more efficient (and versatile) solutions have been in existence for a long time, for example within this article reprinted here: htmlgoodies.com/beyond/javascript/article.php/11877_3755006_3/… – Joseph Myers May 14 '13 at 6:00
1  
possible duplicate of JavaScript query string – user456814 Jul 31 '13 at 23:09
4  
Joseph, the "excellent observation that jQuery is not needed"? Of course it's not needed. Everything jQuery does, it does using JavaScript. People don't use jQuery because it does stuff that JavaScript can't do. The point of jQuery is convenience. – Vladimir Kornea May 30 '14 at 1:12

73 Answers 73

up vote 5094 down vote accepted

You don't need jQuery for that purpose. You can use just some pure JavaScript:

function getParameterByName(name, url) {
    if (!url) url = window.location.href;
    name = name.replace(/[\[\]]/g, "\\$&");
    var regex = new RegExp("[?&]" + name + "(=([^&#]*)|&|#|$)"),
        results = regex.exec(url);
    if (!results) return null;
    if (!results[2]) return '';
    return decodeURIComponent(results[2].replace(/\+/g, " "));
}

Usage:

// query string: ?foo=lorem&bar=&baz
var foo = getParameterByName('foo'); // "lorem"
var bar = getParameterByName('bar'); // "" (present with empty value)
var baz = getParameterByName('baz'); // "" (present with no value)
var qux = getParameterByName('qux'); // null (absent)


Note: If a parameter is present several times (?foo=lorem&foo=ipsum), you will get the first value (lorem). There is no standard about this and usages vary, see for example this question: Authoritative position of duplicate HTTP GET query keys.

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842  
No one's saying it can't be done with pure Javascript. If you're already using jQuery, and jQuery has a function to do this, then it would make sense to use jQuery instead of reinventing the wheel with a new function. – Cerin Jan 31 '11 at 22:05
99  
How does this function handle http://www.mysite.com/index.php?x=x1&x=x2&x=x3 The value of field x is ambiguous. – dpp Jul 9 '11 at 6:34
62  
this also doesn't handle multi-valued keys, which are also perfectly legal. – hurrymaplelad Oct 7 '11 at 8:47
14  
For a querystring of ?mykey=0&m.+key=1, calling getParameterByName("m.+key") would return 0 instead of 1. You need to escape the regular expression metacharacters in name before building your regular expression. And you only need to call .replace() once by using the global flag and using "\\$&" as the replacement expression. You should search on location.search instead of location.href. An answer with over 400 upvotes should account for these details. – gilly3 Dec 9 '11 at 22:28
13  
This is the worst answer to any question that I've ever seen. Not calling a standard, debugged and maintained library for something so basic is madness... – frabcus Feb 5 '13 at 23:12

Some of the solutions posted here are inefficient. Repeating the regular expression search every time the script needs to access a parameter is completely unnecessary, one single function to split up the parameters into an associative-array style object is enough. If you're not working with the HTML 5 History API, this is only necessary once per page load. The other suggestions here also fail to decode the URL correctly.

var urlParams;
(window.onpopstate = function () {
    var match,
        pl     = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
        search = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
        decode = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(pl, " ")); },
        query  = window.location.search.substring(1);

    urlParams = {};
    while (match = search.exec(query))
       urlParams[decode(match[1])] = decode(match[2]);
})();

Example querystring:

?i=main&mode=front&sid=de8d49b78a85a322c4155015fdce22c4&enc=+Hello%20&empty

Result:

 urlParams = {
    enc: " Hello ",
    i: "main",
    mode: "front",
    sid: "de8d49b78a85a322c4155015fdce22c4",
    empty: ""
}

alert(urlParams["mode"]);
// -> "front"

alert("empty" in urlParams);
// -> true

This could easily be improved upon to handle array-style query strings too. An example of this is here, but since array-style parameters aren't defined in RFC 3986 I won't pollute this answer with the source code. For those interested in a "polluted" version, look at campbeln's answer below.

Also, as pointed out in the comments, ; is a legal delimiter for key=value pairs. It would require a more complicated regex to handle ; or &, which I think is unnecessary because it's rare that ; is used and I would say even more unlikely that both would be used. If you need to support ; instead of &, just swap them in the regex.


If you're using a server-side preprocessing language, you might want to use its native JSON functions to do the heavy lifting for you. For example, in PHP you can write:

<script>var urlParams = <?php echo json_encode($_GET, JSON_HEX_TAG);?>;</script>

Much simpler!

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8  
if you're doing a heavily ajax'd app, then you may be using the hash(#) to "enable the back button"... in that case the querystring would change all the time (see how facebook does it)... though these solutions ignore things that come after the # anways... – Nick Franceschina Jul 14 '10 at 0:12
91  
@Nick: Anything after the hash resides in the window.location.hash property, which is separate from the window.location.search property. If the hash changes, it doesn't affect the querystring at all. – Andy E Jul 14 '10 at 9:20
22  
Don't forget the ; is a legal delimiter for GET key=value pairs. It is rare, but it takes 5 seconds to implement. – alex Nov 15 '10 at 11:26
4  
+1 for correctly handling parameters which aren't followed by equals sign – Kip Sep 22 '11 at 19:46
14  
For those of us using a fairly strict setup of JSHint swap the while(match = search.exec(query)) with while((match = search.exec(query)) !== null) – craigts Sep 4 '13 at 19:26

Without jQuery

var qs = (function(a) {
    if (a == "") return {};
    var b = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
    {
        var p=a[i].split('=', 2);
        if (p.length == 1)
            b[p[0]] = "";
        else
            b[p[0]] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
    }
    return b;
})(window.location.search.substr(1).split('&'));

With an URL like ?topic=123&name=query+string, the following will return:

qs["topic"];    // 123
qs["name"];     // query string
qs["nothere"];  // undefined (object)

Google method

Tearing Google's code I found the method they use: getUrlParameters

function (b) {
    var c = typeof b === "undefined";
    if (a !== h && c) return a;
    for (var d = {}, b = b || k[B][vb], e = b[p]("?"), f = b[p]("#"), b = (f === -1 ? b[Ya](e + 1) : [b[Ya](e + 1, f - e - 1), "&", b[Ya](f + 1)][K](""))[z]("&"), e = i.dd ? ia : unescape, f = 0, g = b[w]; f < g; ++f) {
        var l = b[f][p]("=");
        if (l !== -1) {
            var q = b[f][I](0, l),
                l = b[f][I](l + 1),
                l = l[Ca](/\+/g, " ");
            try {
                d[q] = e(l)
            } catch (A) {}
        }
    }
    c && (a = d);
    return d
}

It is obfuscated, but it is understandable.

They start to look for parameters on the url from ? and also from the hash #. Then for each parameter they split in the equal sign b[f][p]("=") (which looks like indexOf, they use the position of the char to get the key/value). Having it split they check whether the parameter has a value or not, if it has they store the value of d, if not it just continue.

In the end the object d is returned, handling escaping and the + sign. This object is just like mine, it has the same behavior.


My method as a jQuery plugin

(function($) {
    $.QueryString = (function(a) {
        if (a == "") return {};
        var b = {};
        for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
        {
            var p=a[i].split('=', 2);
            if (p.length != 2) continue;
            b[p[0]] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
        }
        return b;
    })(window.location.search.substr(1).split('&'))
})(jQuery);

Usage

//Get a param
$.QueryString.param
//-or-
$.QueryString["param"]
//This outputs something like...
//"val"

//Get all params as object
$.QueryString
//This outputs something like...
//Object { param: "val", param2: "val" }

//Set a param (only in the $.QueryString object, doesn't affect the browser's querystring)
$.QueryString.param = "newvalue"
//This doesn't output anything, it just updates the $.QueryString object

//Convert object into string suitable for url a querystring (Requires jQuery)
$.param($.QueryString)
//This outputs something like...
//"param=newvalue&param2=val"

//Update the url/querystring in the browser's location bar with the $.QueryString object
history.replaceState({}, '', "?" + $.param($.QueryString));
//-or-
history.pushState({}, '', "?" + $.param($.QueryString));

Performance test (split method against regex method) (jsPerf)

Preparation code: methods declaration

Split test code

var qs = window.GetQueryString(query);

var search = qs["q"];
var value = qs["value"];
var undef = qs["undefinedstring"];

Regex test code

var search = window.getParameterByName("q");
var value = window.getParameterByName("value");
var undef = window.getParameterByName("undefinedstring");

Testing in Firefox 4.0 x86 on Windows Server 2008 R2 / 7 x64

  • Split method: 144,780 ±2.17% fastest
  • Regex method: 13,891 ±0.85% | 90% slower
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6  
@Andy: I've posted an improved version. What do you think of it? – BrunoLM Oct 16 '10 at 1:51
37  
Curious why you'd make this a jQuery plugin when it doesn't have any jQuery specific code? – zachleat Feb 23 '11 at 13:55
41  
@zachleat if you don't have a framework your functions will just get spread across your code. If you extend jQuery you will have a scope for your functions, it won't be floating around somewhere in your code. I think that is the only reason. – BrunoLM Feb 23 '11 at 13:57
5  
Here is the jQuery version tweaked to pass JSLint (at least the semi-moving target of JSLint.com on 2011-06-15). Mostly just moving things around to appease The Crockford. – patridge Jun 15 '11 at 17:48
8  
Thank god for the benchmark. I'm writing code that needs to access a 50 thousand query string parameters and now I know which one to use. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Sep 7 '13 at 15:41

Improved version of Artem Barger's answer:

function getParameterByName(name) {
    var match = RegExp('[?&]' + name + '=([^&]*)').exec(window.location.search);
    return match && decodeURIComponent(match[1].replace(/\+/g, ' '));
}

For more information on improvement see: http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/bujs-1-getparameterbyname/

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21  
If you wanted to shorten it a bit more, you could do away with the ternary conditional and replace it with a bit of short-circuitry on that last line - return match && decodeURIComponent(match[1].replace(/\+/g, ' '));. – Andy E Mar 1 '11 at 21:57
    
It returns null if the parameter isnt followed by '='. You could prepend if (!RegExp('[?&]'+name+'(&.*)?$').exec(window.location.search)) return false; to make it return boolean false if the parameter isnt there at all. – commonpike Dec 3 '12 at 14:44
3  
I wanted a solution that simply found the value of a query param key I specified. If it returned null or blank I'll handle that appropriately. Your solution worked the best after googling for a long time. – Brian Rosedale Jan 16 '14 at 2:30
6  
I would use the new prefix when creating the regex: var match = new RegExp('... – Patrick Berkeley Jun 10 '14 at 15:03
    
IE11 bug: IE decides to prepend the returned value with ascii character 8206 (hex: 200E - the "left-to-right character"). I wasted over 6 hours finding this! therapeutic venting .... to fix, tack to the end of the last line: .replace('\u200E', '') – JayRO-GreyBeard Dec 31 '15 at 12:21

Just another recommendation. The plugin Purl allows to retrieve all parts of URL, including anchor, host, etc.

It can be used with or without jQuery.

Usage is very simple and cool:

var url = $.url('http://allmarkedup.com/folder/dir/index.html?item=value'); // jQuery version
var url = purl('http://allmarkedup.com/folder/dir/index.html?item=value'); // plain JS version
url.attr('protocol'); // returns 'http'
url.attr('path'); // returns '/folder/dir/index.html'

However, as of Nov 11, 2014, Purl is no longer maintained and the author recommends using URI.js instead. The jQuery plugin is different in that it focuses on elements - for usage with strings, just use URI directly, with or without jQuery. Similar code would look as such, fuller docs here:

var url = new URI('http://allmarkedup.com/folder/dir/index.html?item=value'); // plain JS version
url.protocol(); // returns 'http'
url.path(); // returns '/folder/dir/index.html'
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3  
This URL parser is ridiculously fat in file size.. – vsync Jan 21 '14 at 14:25
13  
URL parsing isn't simple. – dimadima Mar 1 '14 at 4:17
2  
Seeing the RegEx engine for purl was created by RegEx Genius Steve Levithan... I'm gonna use this. – Eddie B Sep 2 '14 at 23:57
5  
As of writing purl is no longer maintained and the previous maintainer suggests uri.js – Dan Pantry Mar 26 '15 at 12:49

Roshambo on snipplr.com has a simple script to achieve this described in Get URL Parameters with jQuery | Improved. With his script you also easily get to pull out just the parameters you want.

Here's the gist:

$.urlParam = function(name, url) {
    if (!url) {
     url = window.location.href;
    }
    var results = new RegExp('[\\?&]' + name + '=([^&#]*)').exec(url);
    if (!results) { 
        return undefined;
    }
    return results[1] || undefined;
}

Then just get your parameters from the query string.

So if the URL/query string was xyz.com/index.html?lang=de.

Just call var langval = $.urlParam('lang');, and you've got it.

UZBEKJON has a great blog post on this as well, Get URL parameters & values with jQuery.

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12  
with jQuery seems to mean to namespace the function to the jQuery object. Also, why is the invalid value 0? Sure, I could use strict equality check, but shouldn't it be null ? – alex Jun 17 '12 at 1:34
1  
Exception maybe. Pls no null :( – TFennis Jan 10 '14 at 13:13
    
@TFennis Why should it be an exception? – alex Jan 17 at 21:14
    
Agreed. It works just like a normal javascript variable reference that way (except maybe returning undefined would be more accurate). – Isochronous Feb 10 at 20:49
2  
check best answer here without regular expression stackoverflow.com/questions/19491336/… – Sameer Kazi Feb 15 at 9:00

If you're using jQuery, you can use a library, such as jQuery BBQ: Back Button & Query Library.

...jQuery BBQ provides a full .deparam() method, along with both hash state management, and fragment / query string parse and merge utility methods.

Edit: Adding Deparam Example:

 var DeparamExample = function() {
            var params = $.deparam.querystring();

            //nameofparam is the name of a param from url
            //code below will get param if ajax refresh with hash
            if (typeof params.nameofparam == 'undefined') {
                params = jQuery.deparam.fragment(window.location.href);
            }
            
            if (typeof params.nameofparam != 'undefined') {
                var paramValue = params.nameofparam.toString();
                  
            }
        };

If you want to just use plain JavaScript, you could use...

var getParamValue = (function() {
    var params;
    var resetParams = function() {
            var query = window.location.search;
            var regex = /[?&;](.+?)=([^&;]+)/g;
            var match;

            params = {};

            if (query) {
                while (match = regex.exec(query)) {
                    params[match[1]] = decodeURIComponent(match[2]);
                }
            }    
        };

    window.addEventListener
    && window.addEventListener('popstate', resetParams);

    resetParams();

    return function(param) {
        return params.hasOwnProperty(param) ? params[param] : null;
    }

})();​

Because of the new HTML History API and specifically history.pushState() and history.replaceState(), the URL can change which will invalidate the cache of parameters and their values.

This version will update its internal cache of parameters each time the history changes.

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tl;dr

A quick, complete solution, which handles multivalued keys and encoded characters.

var qd = {};
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {var s = item.split("="), k = s[0], v = s[1] && decodeURIComponent(s[1]); (k in qd) ? qd[k].push(v) : qd[k] = [v]})
Multi-lined:
var qd = {};
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {
    var s = item.split("="),
        k = s[0],
        v = s[1] && decodeURIComponent(s[1]);
    (k in qd) ? qd[k].push(v) : qd[k] = [v]
})
Example:
"?a=1&b=0&c=3&d&e&a=5&a=t%20e%20x%20t&e=http%3A%2F%2Fw3schools.com%2Fmy%20test.asp%3Fname%3Dståle%26car%3Dsaab"
> qd
a: ["1", "5", "t e x t"]
b: ["0"]
c: ["3"]
d: [undefined]
e: [undefined, "http://w3schools.com/my test.asp?name=ståle&car=saab"]

> qd.a[1]    // "5"
> qd["a"][1] // "5"

Read more... about the vanilla JavaScript solution.

To access different parts of a URL use location.(search|hash)

Easiest (dummy) solution

var queryDict = {};
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {queryDict[item.split("=")[0]] = item.split("=")[1]})
  • Handles empty keys correctly.
  • Overrides multi-keys with last value found.
"?a=1&b=0&c=3&d&e&a=5"
> queryDict
a: "5"
b: "0"
c: "3"
d: undefined
e: undefined

Multi-valued keys

Simple key check (item in dict) ? dict.item.push(val) : dict.item = [val]

var qd = {};
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {(item.split("=")[0] in qd) ? qd[item.split("=")[0]].push(item.split("=")[1]) : qd[item.split("=")[0]] = [item.split("=")[1]]})
  • Now returns arrays instead.
  • Access values by qd.key[index] or qd[key][index]
> qd
a: ["1", "5"]
b: ["0"]
c: ["3"]
d: [undefined]
e: [undefined]

Encoded characters?

Use decodeURIComponent() for the second or both splits.

var qd = {};
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {var k = item.split("=")[0], v = decodeURIComponent(item.split("=")[1]); (k in qd) ? qd[k].push(v) : qd[k] = [v]})
Example:
"?a=1&b=0&c=3&d&e&a=5&a=t%20e%20x%20t&e=http%3A%2F%2Fw3schools.com%2Fmy%20test.asp%3Fname%3Dståle%26car%3Dsaab"
> qd
a: ["1", "5", "t e x t"]
b: ["0"]
c: ["3"]
d: ["undefined"]  // decodeURIComponent(undefined) returns "undefined" !!!*
e: ["undefined", "http://w3schools.com/my test.asp?name=ståle&car=saab"]

*!!! Please note, that decodeURIComponent(undefined) returns string "undefined". The solution lies in a simple usage of &&, which ensures that decodeURIComponent() is not called on undefined values. (See the "complete solution" at the top.)

v = v && decodeURIComponent(v);
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Nice. The only thing I would change - is if there aren't more than one values for a key there is no need for it to be an array. Only use array if there is more than one value per key. – Pavel Nikolov Jan 16 '14 at 21:03
1  
@PavelNikolov I think it would introduce difficulties getting sometimes an array and sometimes a value. You would have to check for it first, now you only check the length, because you will be using cycles for retrieving those values anyways. Also this was meant to be the easiest, but functional, solution here. – Qwerty Jan 16 '14 at 21:20
    
@twig will not work in IE8 – sqram Mar 20 '14 at 18:12
1  
Flattened out a bit for readability, made into a function, and re-used split call: function parseQueryString() { var qd = {}; location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) { var parts = item.split("="); var k = parts[0]; var v = decodeURIComponent(parts[1]); (k in qd) ? qd[k].push(v) : qd[k] = [v,] }); return qd; } – Casey Feb 6 '15 at 10:04
1  
decodeDocumentURI(undefined) returns "undefined" instead of undefined. A functional but not very elegant patch: var qd = {}; location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach( function(item) { var s = item.split("="), k = s[0], v; if(s.length>1) v = decodeURIComponent(s[1]); (k in qd) ? qd[k].push(v) : qd[k] = [v] }) – loop Jun 24 '15 at 12:07

Here's my stab at making Andy E's excellent solution into a full fledged jQuery plugin:

;(function ($) {
    $.extend({      
        getQueryString: function (name) {           
            function parseParams() {
                var params = {},
                    e,
                    a = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
                    r = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
                    d = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(a, " ")); },
                    q = window.location.search.substring(1);

                while (e = r.exec(q))
                    params[d(e[1])] = d(e[2]);

                return params;
            }

            if (!this.queryStringParams)
                this.queryStringParams = parseParams(); 

            return this.queryStringParams[name];
        }
    });
})(jQuery);

The syntax is:

var someVar = $.getQueryString('myParam');

Best of both worlds!

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Just use two splits:

function get(n) {
    var half = location.search.split(n + '=')[1];
    return half !== undefined ? decodeURIComponent(half.split('&')[0]) : null;
}

I was reading all the previous and more complete answers. But I think that is the simplest and faster method. You can check in this jsPerf benchmark

To solve the problem in Rup's comment, add a conditional split by changing the first line to the two below. But absolute accuracy means it's now slower than regexp (see jsPerf).

function get(n) {
    var half = location.search.split('&' + n + '=')[1];
    if (!half) half = location.search.split('?' + n + '=')[1];
    return half !== undefined ? decodeURIComponent(half.split('&')[0]) : null;
}

So if you know you won't run into Rup's counter-case, this wins. Otherwise, regexp.

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5  
Very neat! It won't work though if you have an earlier value with a key name that ends with the one you want, e.g. get('value') on http://the-url?oldvalue=1&value=2. – Rup Sep 4 '12 at 11:46
1  
However, if you know the parameter name are expecting, This will be the faster approach. – Martin Borthiry May 16 '13 at 17:57
    
Edited: If you just test that half is truthy, this returns null for an empty parameter like ?param=. It should return the empty string in this case, and checking half !== undefined solves that. – philh Jun 17 '14 at 15:03
    
Cool! I made a one-liner: function get(param){return decodeURIComponent((location.search.split(param+'=')[1]||'').split('&')[0])} – niutech Sep 1 '14 at 22:54
    
I had to change the second line to return half !== undefined ? decodeURIComponent(half[1].split('&')[0]) : null; to get it to work – divillysausages Jan 13 '15 at 22:54

If you're doing more URL manipulation than simply parsing the querystring, you may find URI.js helpful. It is a library for manipulating URLs - and comes with all the bells and whistles. (Sorry for self-advertising here)

to convert your querystring into a map:

var data = URI('?foo=bar&bar=baz&foo=world').query(true);
data == {
  "foo": ["bar", "world"],
  "bar": "baz"
}

(URI.js also "fixes" bad querystrings like ?&foo&&bar=baz& to ?foo&bar=baz)

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// required src/URI.fragmentURI.js to be loaded – JoeB Mar 19 '13 at 4:15

URLSearchParams

Firefox and Chrome >= 49 support the URLSearchParams API - Chrome Announcement and details. It is not standardized by W3C, but it is a living standard by WhatWG.

You can use it on location, but you need to remove the ? question mark (for example, with .slice(1)):

let params = new URLSearchParams(location.search.slice(1));

Or of course on any URL:

let url = new URL('https://example.com?foo=1&bar=2');
let params = new URLSearchParams(url.search.slice(1));

And you read/set parameters through the get(KEY), set(KEY, VALUE), append(KEY, VALUE) api. You can also iterate over all values for (let p of params) {}.

There's also a google-suggested URLSearchParams polyfill if you want to start using this API without relying on latest version of Chrome/Firefox.

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@DanDascalescu Fixed. – Paul Sweatte Jun 9 '15 at 16:21
    
What a nice solution! – K. _ Jul 20 at 13:07

I like Ryan Phelan's solution. But I don't see any point of extending jQuery for that? There is no usage of jQuery functionality.

On other hand I like the built-in function in Google Chrome: window.location.getParameter.

So why not to use this? Okay, other browsers don't have. So let's create this function if it does not exist:

if (!window.location.getParameter ) {
  window.location.getParameter = function(key) {
    function parseParams() {
        var params = {},
            e,
            a = /\+/g,  // Regex for replacing addition symbol with a space
            r = /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g,
            d = function (s) { return decodeURIComponent(s.replace(a, " ")); },
            q = window.location.search.substring(1);

        while (e = r.exec(q))
            params[d(e[1])] = d(e[2]);

        return params;
    }

    if (!this.queryStringParams)
        this.queryStringParams = parseParams(); 

    return this.queryStringParams[key];
  };
}

This function is more or less from Ryan Phelan, but it is wrapped differently: clear name and no dependencies of other javascript libraries. More about this function on my blog.

share
1  
Looks like window.location.getParameter() has been removed from Chrome. – mhenry1384 Sep 23 '14 at 17:38
1  
Yes, it is gone now, but I like this function and its name. – Anatoly Mironov Sep 24 '14 at 8:06
    
I like the use of caching on the first lookup! :-) – codenamejames Nov 10 '15 at 20:19

Here is a fast way to get an object similar to the PHP $_GET array:

function get_query(){
    var url = location.search;
    var qs = url.substring(url.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for(var i = 0, result = {}; i < qs.length; i++){
        qs[i] = qs[i].split('=');
        result[qs[i][0]] = decodeURIComponent(qs[i][1]);
    }
    return result;
}

Usage:

var $_GET = get_query();

For the query string x=5&y&z=hello&x=6 this returns the object:

{
  x: "6",
  y: undefined,
  z: "hello"
}
share
    
if you need it as a jQuery plugin, here it is: (function($) { $.extend({ get_query: function (name) { var url = location.href; var qs = url.substring(url.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&'); for(var i = 0, result = {}; i < qs.length; i++){ qs[i] = qs[i].split('='); result[qs[i][0]] = qs[i][1]; } return result; } }); })(jQuery); and use like this: $.get_query() – tim Feb 13 '13 at 1:55
    
Thanks. I also ended up using this. I added this before your return statement: if (param) return result[param], that way i can also do get_query('foo') if needed – sqram Oct 16 '13 at 18:00
1  
Not working if you have hashes. For example: test.aspx?test=t1#default. Will return { test: "t1#default" } and I expect {test : "t1" } – Bogdan M. Jan 16 '14 at 8:52
    
@BogdanM: indeed. location.href would have to be replaced with location.search. – Dan Dascalescu Jun 9 '15 at 11:57

Keep it simple in plain JavaScript code:

function qs(key) {
    var vars = [], hash;
    var hashes = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for(var i = 0; i < hashes.length; i++)
    {
        hash = hashes[i].split('=');
        vars.push(hash[0]);
        vars[hash[0]] = hash[1];
    }
    return vars[key];
}

Call it from anywhere in the JavaScript code:

var result = qs('someKey');
share
1  
I think you are doing something similar as me, but I think my approach is MUCH simplier stackoverflow.com/a/21152762/985454 – Qwerty Jan 16 '14 at 14:52

From the MDN:

function loadPageVar (sVar) {
  return unescape(window.location.search.replace(new RegExp("^(?:.*[&\\?]" + escape(sVar).replace(/[\.\+\*]/g, "\\$&") + "(?:\\=([^&]*))?)?.*$", "i"), "$1"));
}

alert(loadPageVar("name"));
share
    
Thank you. I needed to catch lat lng values coming back from Controller Action so I could set Google Map javascript yours just went right in and worked. – JustJohn Oct 14 '15 at 22:45

These are all great answers, but I needed something a bit more robust, and thought you all might like to have what I created.

It is a simple library method that does dissection and manipulation of URL parameters. The static method has the following sub methods that can be called on the subject URL:

  • getHost
  • getPath
  • getHash
  • setHash
  • getParams
  • getQuery
  • setParam
  • getParam
  • hasParam
  • removeParam

Example:

URLParser(url).getParam('myparam1')

var url = "http://www.test.com/folder/mypage.html?myparam1=1&myparam2=2#something";

function URLParser(u){
    var path="",query="",hash="",params;
    if(u.indexOf("#") > 0){
        hash = u.substr(u.indexOf("#") + 1);
        u = u.substr(0 , u.indexOf("#"));
    }
    if(u.indexOf("?") > 0){
        path = u.substr(0 , u.indexOf("?"));
        query = u.substr(u.indexOf("?") + 1);
        params= query.split('&');
    }else
        path = u;
    return {
        getHost: function(){
            var hostexp = /\/\/([\w.-]*)/;
            var match = hostexp.exec(path);
            if (match != null && match.length > 1)
                return match[1];
            return "";
        },
        getPath: function(){
            var pathexp = /\/\/[\w.-]*(?:\/([^?]*))/;
            var match = pathexp.exec(path);
            if (match != null && match.length > 1)
                return match[1];
            return "";
        },
        getHash: function(){
            return hash;
        },
        getParams: function(){
            return params
        },
        getQuery: function(){
            return query;
        },
        setHash: function(value){
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(value.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + value;
            return path + query;
        },
        setParam: function(name, value){
            if(!params){
                params= new Array();
            }
            params.push(name + '=' + value);
            for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                if(query.length > 0)
                    query += "&";
                query += params[i];
            }
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(hash.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + hash;
            return path + query;
        },
        getParam: function(name){
            if(params){
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) == name)
                        return decodeURIComponent(pair[1]);
                }
            }
            console.log('Query variable %s not found', name);
        },
        hasParam: function(name){
            if(params){
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) == name)
                        return true;
                }
            }
            console.log('Query variable %s not found', name);
        },
        removeParam: function(name){
            query = "";
            if(params){
                var newparams = new Array();
                for (var i = 0;i < params.length;i++) {
                    var pair = params[i].split('=');
                    if (decodeURIComponent(pair[0]) != name)
                          newparams .push(params[i]);
                }
                params = newparams;
                for (var i = 0; i < params.length; i++) {
                    if(query.length > 0)
                        query += "&";
                    query += params[i];
                }
            }
            if(query.length > 0)
                query = "?" + query;
            if(hash.length > 0)
                query = query + "#" + hash;
            return path + query;
        },
    }
}


document.write("Host: " + URLParser(url).getHost() + '<br>');
document.write("Path: " + URLParser(url).getPath() + '<br>');
document.write("Query: " + URLParser(url).getQuery() + '<br>');
document.write("Hash: " + URLParser(url).getHash() + '<br>');
document.write("Params Array: " + URLParser(url).getParams() + '<br>');
document.write("Param: " + URLParser(url).getParam('myparam1') + '<br>');
document.write("Has Param: " + URLParser(url).hasParam('myparam1') + '<br>');

document.write(url + '<br>');

// Remove the first parameter
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam1');
document.write(url + ' - Remove the first parameter<br>');

// Add a third parameter
url = URLParser(url).setParam('myparam3',3);
document.write(url + ' - Add a third parameter<br>');

// Remove the second parameter
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam2');
document.write(url + ' - Remove the second parameter<br>');

// Add a hash
url = URLParser(url).setHash('newhash');
document.write(url + ' - Set Hash<br>');

// Remove the last parameter
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam3');
document.write(url + ' - Remove the last parameter<br>');

// Remove a parameter that doesn't exist
url = URLParser(url).removeParam('myparam3');
document.write(url + ' - Remove a parameter that doesn\"t exist<br>');
share

Code golf:

var a = location.search&&location.search.substr(1).replace(/\+/gi," ").split("&");
for (var i in a) {
    var s = a[i].split("=");
    a[i]  = a[unescape(s[0])] = unescape(s[1]);
}

Display it!

for (i in a) {
    document.write(i + ":" + a[i] + "<br/>");   
};

On my Mac: test.htm?i=can&has=cheezburger displays

0:can
1:cheezburger
i:can
has:cheezburger
share
5  
I love your answer, especially how compact the script is, but you should probably be using decodeURIComponent. See xkr.us/articles/javascript/encode-compare and stackoverflow.com/questions/619323/… – pluckyglen Aug 10 '11 at 1:08
function GET() {
        var data = [];
        for(x = 0; x < arguments.length; ++x)
            data.push(location.href.match(new RegExp("/\?".concat(arguments[x],"=","([^\n&]*)")))[1])
                return data;
    }


example:
data = GET("id","name","foo");
query string : ?id=3&name=jet&foo=b
returns:
    data[0] // 3
    data[1] // jet
    data[2] // b
or
    alert(GET("id")[0]) // return 3
share
4  
This is an interesting approach, returning an array containing values from the specified parameters. It does have at least one issue - not correctly URL decoding the values, and it would need to URL encode the parameter names used in match too. It will function on simple query strings in its present form though. ps don't forget to use the var keyword when declaring variables in for statements. – Andy E Jul 11 '10 at 8:28

Roshambo jQuery method wasn't taking care of decode URL

http://snipplr.com/view/26662/get-url-parameters-with-jquery--improved/

Just added that capability also while adding in the return statement

return decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " ")) || 0;

Now you can find the updated gist:

$.urlParam = function(name){
var results = new RegExp('[\\?&]' + name + '=([^&#]*)').exec(window.location.href);
if (!results) { return 0; }
return decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " ")) || 0;
}
share

I like this one (taken from jquery-howto.blogspot.co.uk):

// get an array with all querystring values
// example: var valor = getUrlVars()["valor"];
function getUrlVars() {
    var vars = [], hash;
    var hashes = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&');
    for (var i = 0; i < hashes.length; i++) {
        hash = hashes[i].split('=');
        vars.push(hash[0]);
        vars[hash[0]] = hash[1];
    }
    return vars;
}

Works great for me.

share

I use regular expressions a lot, but not for that.

It seems easier and more efficient to me to read the query string once in my application, and build an object from all the key/value pairs like:

var search = function() {
  var s = window.location.search.substr(1),
    p = s.split(/\&/), l = p.length, kv, r = {};
  if (l === 0) {return false;}
  while (l--) {
    kv = p[l].split(/\=/);
    r[kv[0]] = decodeURIComponent(kv[1] || '') || true;
  }
  return r;
}();

For a URL like http://domain.com?param1=val1&param2=val2 you can get their value later in your code as search.param1 and search.param2.

share

Here's my edit to this excellent answer - with added ability to parse query strings with keys without values.

var url = 'http://sb.com/reg/step1?param';
var qs = (function(a) {
    if (a == "") return {};
    var b = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
        var p=a[i].split('=', 2);
        if (p[1]) p[1] = decodeURIComponent(p[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
        b[p[0]] = p[1];
    }
    return b;
})((url.split('?'))[1].split('&'));

IMPORTANT! The parameter for that function in the last line is different. It's just an example of how one can pass an arbitrary URL to it. You can use last line from Bruno's answer to parse the current URL.

So what exactly changed? With url http://sb.com/reg/step1?param= results will be same. But with url http://sb.com/reg/step1?param Bruno's solution returns an object without keys, while mine returns an object with key param and undefined value.

share

I needed an object from the query string, and I hate lots of code. It may not be the most robust in the universe, but it's just a few lines of code.

var q = {};
location.href.split('?')[1].split('&').forEach(function(i){
    q[i.split('=')[0]]=i.split('=')[1];
});

A URL like this.htm?hello=world&foo=bar will create:

{hello:'world', foo:'bar'}
share
3  
Neat. According to Mozilla, though, forEach doesn't work on IE7 or 8 and I suspect that'll fall over if there's no query string at all. One minimal improvement that would cover more cases would be to decodeURIComponent the value as you store it - and arguably the key as well, but you're less likely to use odd strings in that. – Rup Feb 15 '13 at 10:39
    
Good idea. Like I said. It's not super robust. But many of my clients now see so little traffic from IE7/8 that I'm no longer sweating it. – tim Jun 27 '13 at 19:21
1  
Nice and simple. Doesn't handle array parameters nor ?a&b&c but this is really very readable (and incidentally similar to my first idea). Also the split is redundant but I've got bigger performance fish to fry than splitting a 10 character string twice. – cod3monk3y Feb 25 '14 at 22:44
    
when querystring is "?hello=world&one=a=b&two=2" then when you grab the value of 'one' you only get the part before the first '=' in the value. its value shud be 'a=b' but you only get 'a' because you split 'one=a=b' on '='. this is simply buggy. :(( – Shawn Kovac May 19 '15 at 21:30

This is a function I created a while back and I'm quite happy with. It is not case sensitive - which is handy. Also, if the requested QS doesn't exist, it just returns an empty string.

I use a compressed version of this. I'm posting uncompressed for the novice types to better explain what's going on.

I'm sure this could be optimized or done differently to work faster, but it's always worked great for what I need.

Enjoy.

function getQSP(sName, sURL) {
    var theItmToRtn = "";
    var theSrchStrg = location.search;
    if (sURL) theSrchStrg = sURL;
    var sOrig = theSrchStrg;
    theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg.toUpperCase();
    sName = sName.toUpperCase();
    theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg.replace("?", "&") theSrchStrg = theSrchStrg + "&";
    var theSrchToken = "&" + sName + "=";
    if (theSrchStrg.indexOf(theSrchToken) != -1) {
        var theSrchTokenLth = theSrchToken.length;
        var theSrchTokenLocStart = theSrchStrg.indexOf(theSrchToken) + theSrchTokenLth;
        var theLocOfNextAndSign = theSrchStrg.indexOf("&", theSrchTokenLocStart);
        theItmToRtn = unescape(sOrig.substring(theSrchTokenLocStart, theLocOfNextAndSign));
    }
    return unescape(theItmToRtn);
}
share
30  
you need to work on those var names – ajax333221 May 25 '12 at 22:20
    
Also, better to go for decodeURI() or decodeURIComponent() instead of unescape(). developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Adarsh Konchady Nov 7 '15 at 13:27

We've just released arg.js, a project aimed at solving this problem once and for all. It's traditionally been so difficult but now you can do:

var name = Arg.get("name");

or getting the whole lot:

var params = Arg.all();

and if you care about the difference between ?query=true and #hash=true then you can use the Arg.query() and Arg.hash() methods.

share
    
you saved me man.. arg.js is the solution none of the solutions is getting the values from # in IE 8..:( any one searching for IE8 # get from request this is the solution.. – Dilip Rajkumar Feb 4 '14 at 10:12

The problem with the top answer on that question is that it's not-supported parameters placed after #, but sometimes it's needed to get this value also.

I modified the answer to let it parse a full query string with a hash sign also:

var getQueryStringData = function(name) {
    var result = null;
    var regexS = "[\\?&#]" + name + "=([^&#]*)";
    var regex = new RegExp(regexS);
    var results = regex.exec('?' + window.location.href.split('?')[1]);
    if (results != null) {
        result = decodeURIComponent(results[1].replace(/\+/g, " "));
    }
    return result;
};
share
1  
That's interesting if you need it but there's no standard for the format of the hash part AFAIK so it's not fair to call that out as a weakness of the other answer. – Rup Apr 22 '13 at 12:48
2  
Yes, I know. But in my app i integrate 3rd party js navigation, which have some parameters after hash sign. – Ph0en1x Apr 22 '13 at 14:15
    
For example, in the Google search page, the searching query is followed by the hash sign '#'. – etlds Jun 26 '14 at 14:51
function GetQueryStringParams(sParam)
{
    var sPageURL = window.location.search.substring(1);
    var sURLVariables = sPageURL.split('&');

    for (var i = 0; i < sURLVariables.length; i++)
    {
        var sParameterName = sURLVariables[i].split('=');
        if (sParameterName[0] == sParam)
        {
            return sParameterName[1];
        }
    }
}​

And this is how you can use this function assuming the URL is

http://dummy.com/?stringtext=jquery&stringword=jquerybyexample

var tech = GetQueryStringParams('stringtext');
var blog = GetQueryStringParams('stringword');
share
    
There's a few implementations of this approach here already. At the very least you need to decodeUriComponent() the result values. This might also misbehave if you don't specify a value, e.g. ?stringtext&stringword=foo. – Rup Feb 6 '13 at 10:52

Here's an extended version of Andy E's linked "Handle array-style query strings"-version. Fixed a bug (?key=1&key[]=2&key[]=3; 1 is lost and replaced with [2,3]), made a few minor performance improvements (re-decoding of values, recalculating "[" position, etc.) and added a number of improvements (functionalized, support for ?key=1&key=2, support for ; delimiters). I left the variables annoyingly short, but added comments galore to make them readable (oh, and I reused v within the local functions, sorry if that is confusing ;).

It will handle the following querystring...

?test=Hello&person=neek&person[]=jeff&person[]=jim&person[extra]=john&test3&nocache=1398914891264

...making it into an object that looks like...

{
    "test": "Hello",
    "person": {
        "0": "neek",
        "1": "jeff",
        "2": "jim",
        "length": 3,
        "extra": "john"
    },
    "test3": "",
    "nocache": "1398914891264"
}

As you can see above, this version handles some measure of "malformed" arrays, i.e. - person=neek&person[]=jeff&person[]=jim or person=neek&person=jeff&person=jim as the key is identifiable and valid (at least in dotNet's NameValueCollection.Add):

If the specified key already exists in the target NameValueCollection instance, the specified value is added to the existing comma-separated list of values in the form "value1,value2,value3".

It seems the jury is somewhat out on repeated keys as there is no spec. In this case, multiple keys are stored as an (fake)array. But do note that I do not process values based on commas into arrays.

The code:

getQueryStringKey = function(key) {
    return getQueryStringAsObject()[key];
};


getQueryStringAsObject = function() {
    var b, cv, e, k, ma, sk, v, r = {},
        d = function (v) { return decodeURIComponent(v).replace(/\+/g, " "); }, //# d(ecode) the v(alue)
        q = window.location.search.substring(1),
        s = /([^&;=]+)=?([^&;]*)/g //# original regex that does not allow for ; as a delimiter:   /([^&=]+)=?([^&]*)/g
    ;

    //# ma(make array) out of the v(alue)
    ma = function(v) {
        //# If the passed v(alue) hasn't been setup as an object
        if (typeof v != "object") {
            //# Grab the cv(current value) then setup the v(alue) as an object
            cv = v;
            v = {};
            v.length = 0;

            //# If there was a cv(current value), .push it into the new v(alue)'s array
            //#     NOTE: This may or may not be 100% logical to do... but it's better than loosing the original value
            if (cv) { Array.prototype.push.call(v, cv); }
        }
        return v;
    };

    //# While we still have key-value e(ntries) from the q(uerystring) via the s(earch regex)...
    while (e = s.exec(q)) { //# while((e = s.exec(q)) !== null) {
        //# Collect the open b(racket) location (if any) then set the d(ecoded) v(alue) from the above split key-value e(ntry) 
        b = e[1].indexOf("[");
        v = d(e[2]);

        //# As long as this is NOT a hash[]-style key-value e(ntry)
        if (b < 0) { //# b == "-1"
            //# d(ecode) the simple k(ey)
            k = d(e[1]);

            //# If the k(ey) already exists
            if (r[k]) {
                //# ma(make array) out of the k(ey) then .push the v(alue) into the k(ey)'s array in the r(eturn value)
                r[k] = ma(r[k]);
                Array.prototype.push.call(r[k], v);
            }
            //# Else this is a new k(ey), so just add the k(ey)/v(alue) into the r(eturn value)
            else {
                r[k] = v;
            }
        }
        //# Else we've got ourselves a hash[]-style key-value e(ntry) 
        else {
            //# Collect the d(ecoded) k(ey) and the d(ecoded) sk(sub-key) based on the b(racket) locations
            k = d(e[1].slice(0, b));
            sk = d(e[1].slice(b + 1, e[1].indexOf("]", b)));

            //# ma(make array) out of the k(ey) 
            r[k] = ma(r[k]);

            //# If we have a sk(sub-key), plug the v(alue) into it
            if (sk) { r[k][sk] = v; }
            //# Else .push the v(alue) into the k(ey)'s array
            else { Array.prototype.push.call(r[k], v); }
        }
    }

    //# Return the r(eturn value)
    return r;
};
share
    
That's neat, although I disagree the ?key=1&key[]=2&key[]=3 case is a bug: I'd say malformed input, even if .NET will process it. I also disagree with using ; as a separator - where's the spec for that? - although a lot of people do want support for it (?). You're returning a fake array too, even when there are no user-specified keys, although if consumers treat it as read-only that ought not matter. Why check the indexOf result as a string? And where's the double-decode in Andy E's answer? – Rup May 1 '14 at 17:31
    
Malformed: I'm not certain if .NET processes it or not, but I've never seen the [] notation in a QS. But I did mention this was controversial ;) Also, if we can process it, then why not!? Fake Array: as per Andy E's example. indexOf: As per Andy E's example. Semi-Colan: It was mentioned in Andy E's/Wikipedia, but I've also never seen that (and a comment is there that tells you how to remove the feature). Re-Decode: jsbin.com/adali3/2/edit, pN is d()'d at assignment, then again and again below. – Campbeln May 1 '14 at 22:34
    
Oops, my mistake: I was looking at Andy's code in the answer not the linked version. – Rup May 2 '14 at 9:04
    
For getting the query string values you can use this "GetParameterValues" function. In this you just have to pass the query stirng parameter name and it'll return you the value $(document).ready(function () { var bid = GetParameterValues('token'); }); function GetParameterValues(param) { var url = decodeURIComponent(window.location.href); url = url.slice(url.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&'); for (var i = 0; i < url.length; i++) { var urlparam = url[i].split('='); if (urlparam[0] == param) { return urlparam[1]; } } – Mike Clark Feb 3 '15 at 10:10

I developed a small library using techniques listed here to create an easy to use, drop-in solution to anyones troubles; It can be found here:

https://github.com/Nijikokun/query-js

Usage

Fetching specific parameter/key:

query.get('param');

Using the builder to fetch the entire object:

var storage = query.build();
console.log(storage.param);

and tons more... check the github link for more examples.

Features

  1. Caching on both decoding and parameters
  2. Supports hash query strings #hello?page=3
  3. Supports passing custom queries
  4. Supports Array / Object Parameters user[]="jim"&user[]="bob"
  5. Supports empty management &&
  6. Supports declaration parameters without values name&hello="world"
  7. Supports repeated parameters param=1&param=2
  8. Clean, compact, and readable source 4kb
  9. AMD, Require, Node support
share

protected by Community Oct 23 '11 at 15:27

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