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I am trying to track the CPU usage of a process using a command like this:

    top -b -d 1 | grep myprocess.exe

Next, I would like to redirect this to a log file, e.g.

    top -b -d 1 | grep myprocess.exe > output.log

Now, this does not actually work because it thinks I am grepping myprocess.exe > output.log instead of myprocess.exe

Does anybody know how I can get this redirect to work?

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Why do you think it's grepping for the redirect? The redirect is interpreted by bash and doesn't make it to the process name –  Kevin Jan 25 '12 at 22:37
    
top -b -d 1 | grep postgres > output.log works on my machine (Ubuntu 10.04 LTS). –  Ortwin Angermeier Jan 25 '12 at 23:05
    
Perhaps that is true, but it still doesn't explain why output.log is empty when I run the second command. –  user788171 Jan 25 '12 at 23:05
    
What environment are you using? (distro, command shell) –  Ortwin Angermeier Jan 26 '12 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

Now, this does not actually work because it thinks I am grepping myprocess.exe > output.log instead of myprocess.exe

Wrong. All should be fine. The 1st example executes the pipeline with stdout set to your terminal (thus you see the output, but nothing is written to the file). The 2nd example executes the pipeline with stdout set to output.log (thus you don't see output, but it will go right in your file).

If you want the output written to both, you need another process that gets your previous pipeline's stdout as stdin, and duplicates it. Like:

previous_pipeline | tee output.log

tee will print on stdout what it gets on stdin (So for stdout, everything is the same as before), but additionally open another file (given as cmdline arg) and write a copy to it.

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Try tee:

top -b -d 1 | grep myprocess.exe | tee output.log

If you want it to show no output:

top -b -d 1 | grep myprocess.exe | tee output.log > /dev/null
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How are they different from OP's command? –  shadyabhi Jan 25 '12 at 22:32
    
So tee does not seem to work for me. I get the same result as before (e.g. output.log is empty). –  user788171 Jan 25 '12 at 22:40
    
Sorry, but the 2nd example does essentially the same as OP's 2nd example. The 1st example should be the solution. –  Jo So Jan 25 '12 at 22:44
    
Actually, I tried the first example above and that still gave an empty output.log. Any ideas? –  user788171 Jan 25 '12 at 22:47
    
@user788171: On my system, tee seems to collect a bit of output and write in bigger bursts (while grep simply writes as soon as it can, so the -d 1 option to top had effect, it now hasn't). You can be happy with it, or go with the file-only solution (try tail -f FILE | less) on a file that is being written to. –  Jo So Jan 25 '12 at 23:33

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