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Can anyone explain me the output of the following. I tried to reason everything and can explain the later part where 'x' is assigned the value of the expression but cannot understand how the answer is different in a printf statement!!!

Different compilers might behave differently. It would be great if someone could explain this behavior for any compiler.

I am using gcc (SUSE Linux) 4.6.2 on openSUSE 12.1 (Asparagus) (i586)

code :

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
unsigned int x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x),x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x)||x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x||x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",++x||x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",x++||++x||x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x||x++,x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
(x^=x);
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
(x^=x)||x++;
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
(x^=x)||x++||++x;
printf("x=%d\n",x);
x=0;
(x^=x)||x++||++x||x++;
printf("x=%d\n",x);

return 0;
}

output :

expr= 0 x=0
x=0
expr= 0 x=1
x=1
expr= 1 x=2
x=2
expr= 1 x=2
x=2
expr= 0 x=1
x=1
expr= 1 x=1
x=1
expr= 1 x=2
x=2
expr= 1 x=2
x=2
x=0
x=1
x=2
x=2

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
That's a lot of code. Please specify which of these you don't understand (better yet, just remove all the ones you do understand). – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 25 '12 at 22:57
1  
I'm continually amazed at the shear number of people who want to pre and post increment a variable between sequence points... why? – Ed S. Jan 25 '12 at 22:59
1  
@EdS.: || is a sequence point. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 25 '12 at 22:59
    
@OliCharlesworth: Haha, how did I miss all of those? :D Looks like David did too. – Ed S. Jan 25 '12 at 23:01
1  
Is this one of those questions where you want to know what your particular compiler happens to be doing but don't care that the code will behave differently on other compilers? – David Heffernan Jan 25 '12 at 23:46

You are invoking unspecified behaviour.

In an expression like func(a,b), the C standard does not specify which argument should be evaluated first; the compiler is free to do either.

So now consider func(x++,x); it is unspecified whether it is equivalent to this:

a = x++;
b = x;
func(a,b);

or this:

b = x;
a = x++;
func(a,b);
share|improve this answer
    
That is the reason why I also have a printf("%d\n",x) after each printf("expr=%d x=%d",'expr',x) just to confirm the same. Looks like the output is consistent. – ntalli Jan 25 '12 at 23:25
printf("expr= %d x=%d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x,x);

This function shows unspecified behavior. The order of evaluation between (x^x)||x++||++x and x is unspecified.

Most of the other printf calls in your program have the same issue.

(C99, 6.5.2.2) "The order of evaluation of the function designator, the actual arguments, and subexpressions within the actual arguments is unspecified, but there is a sequence point before the actual call."

A program whose output depends on unspecified behavior is not a strictly conforming program (see C99, 4.p5).

share|improve this answer
    
IThat is the reason why I also have a printf("%d\n",x) after each printf("expr=%d x=%d",'expr',x) just to confirm the same. Looks like the output is consistent. – ntalli Jan 25 '12 at 23:20
1  
@user1170267 the output can be consistent with your compiler but as it is unspecified behavior it can be different with another version of the same compiler or even different with the same compiler but another day of the week. – ouah Jan 25 '12 at 23:22
    
lets say, I am just concerned with printf("expr= %d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x||x++) ..... and (x^=x)||x++||++x||x++) for the moment. – ntalli Jan 25 '12 at 23:28
1  
@user1170267 printf("expr= %d\n",(x^x)||x++||++x||x++); is not unspecified behavior and is strictly conforming. – ouah Jan 25 '12 at 23:40

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