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I have the following code:

new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate()
{
    while (true)
    {
        //something
    }
})).Start();

Can garbage collector finalize this instance of Thread while it is in the Running state?

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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The CLR keeps track of all running threads. As long as there are references to objects they won't be garbage collected. And since the CLR keeps a reference to all running threads the GC won't touch them.

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No; running threads count as roots. A running thread will not be collected, nor will anything referenced by the active part(s) of the stack for that thread.

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running threads count as roots? or references (inside a threads) which reference to objects count as roots.. ? –  Royi Namir Mar 8 at 9:32
    
@Royi roots - basically, the stack locals. Note that arg0 (aka this) will usually keep the target instance alive too –  Marc Gravell Mar 8 at 12:35
    
So is it wrong/ok to say : GC is not allowed to collect a running thread ? –  Royi Namir Mar 8 at 13:04
    
@Royi well, an actual thread isn't a managed object in the first place. The Thread type is mainly a utility to help talk to the CLI thread, which sometimes is and sometimes isn't a 1:1 map to an OS thread (sql server being an example of "isnt"). –  Marc Gravell Mar 8 at 17:32
    
Sorry , i was talking about managed one . Does gc allow to collect that thread if it has no roots inside it ? –  Royi Namir Mar 8 at 18:04
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In general - no.

But I discovered that a thread CAN be garbage-collected if GC decides the thread is not being "active". So be careful if you use long "Thread.Sleep" in your code or some other "freezing" operations, they can cause the thread to be killed by GC.

Example:

new Thread(new delegate()
{
    try
    {
        Thread.Sleep(600000); //freeze and do nothing for 10 minutes
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        //you WILL catch a "thread being aborted" after a while here
    }
}).Start();
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The thread won't be collected, because each running, waiting or suspended thread is itself used by the GC to decide what is alive (trace everything in every thread's stack, trace everything referenced by all of those objects, then everything referenced by those, and so on, and you've identified everything that can't be garbage collected).

The thread could end, if it was a background thread, because then it'll be actively shut down when all other threads in the process finish. Otherwise the only thing that'll cause it to die is the process being actively exited, an exception (including ThreadAbortException) or it breaking out of the while loop itself.

There's a case that's comparable in some ways, that may be what you are thinking of:

var timer = new System.Threading.Timer(someCallback, null, new TimeSpan(0, 0, 5), new TimeSpan(0, 0, 5));
int someResult = doingSomethingElse();
doSomethingElseThatTakesLongerThan5Seconds();

This is another piece of code that causes another thread of execution to do something. In this case, the timer can indeed be garbage collected before the run, during one of the runs, or pretty much any time after the constructor returns.

The important thing here is that there isn't an individual thread for the timer, and the thread doesn't even "know" about the timer object. Since the last access of the object has since happened, it's eligible for collection. This is different to the matter of an individual thread that is running (or waiting, etc.).

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    new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate() 
    { 
        while (true) 
        { 
            //something 
        } 
        // Will never reach here (unless break is used)
    })).Start(); 
    // Will always go here regardless if the above thread has ended or not
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-1, this answers nothing that was asked. –  JohnD Apr 2 at 19:12
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