Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a small client/server application in c++ with winsock and I can't explain a few things that are happening.. I wrote 2 basic functions that send/receive all the data through a TCP connection..

bool sending(SOCKET source, char* buff, int size, int flags = 0)
{
    int sent = 0;
    int totalst = 0;
    int total = size;
    while(totalst != total)
    {
        sent = send(source, buff+totalst, size-totalst, flags);
        if(sent > 0)
        {
            totalst += sent;
        }
        if(sent == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            return false;
        }       
    }   
    return true;
}

bool receive(SOCKET source, char* buff, int size, int flags = 0)
{
    int rec = 0;
    int totalrc = 0;
    int total = size;
    while(totalrc != total)
    {
        rec = recv(source, buff+totalrc, size-totalrc, flags);
        if(rec > 0)
        {
            totalrc += rec;
        }
        if(rec == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

The server sends out an integer that contains the size of the data block that will follow it.. This size of the data block in my case shouldn't change, it should always be 92600 bytes, but sometimes the client receives 92604 bytes instead. The odd thing is that if I make the server wait after sending the bock size and the block itself(with Sleep) it always sends what I would expect..

int i=0;                    
while(i < 100)
{
    i++;
    dat = getData();                                
    len = sizeof(dat);
    sending(source, (char*)&len, sizeof(len));
    sending(source, dat, len);
    Sleep(200);    
}

Can it bee that the client receives the incorrect value of bytes because of lag ? Is there any way of fixing this? Any help is appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
You've already accepted an answer. But I just pointed out two bugs in your code that are likely related to what you are seeing as result of what todda is talkinga about. See my answer below. –  selbie Jan 26 '12 at 2:09
    
Thank you!Yes, nos already pointed that out in a comment but he removed it shortly after.. I just forgot to update my question.. –  elephantintheroom Jan 26 '12 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider this example:

char *x = "!";
send(socket, x, 1); // destination, buffer, size
send(socket, x, 1);
send(socket, x, 1);
send(socket, x, 1);

What do you expect to happen here?

char buffer[4];
recv(socket, buffer, 4); // source, buffer, size

In practice, the data sent by four send's can be received into one recv. You don't have any guarantee that if you make n calls to send you will make n calls to recv to recieve all the data.

As nos has commented, TCP doesn't implement message boundaries. That's your job, on the application layer. Winsock doesn't send additional data, you do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!I'm starting to understand what's wrong.. –  elephantintheroom Jan 25 '12 at 23:55
    
It's one of the biggest mistakes developers make with sockets - that is to assume that recv() will deliver the data in the same chunking blocks from which the client called "send". A lot of time it just seems to work this way and often code gets deployed like this - and that creates subtle bugs when it starts running in different environments. –  selbie Jan 26 '12 at 1:58

You have a bug in both your sending and receiving function.

You properly keep track of the total bytes sent/received so that you propertly exit your loop, but you forget to adjust the value of "buff" and "size" in subsequent calls to send/recv. If the buffer to send has to get transmitted with multiple calls to send, you'll send the wrong data.

Likewise, if multiple calls to "recv" are needed, you'll overwrite the data copied at the start of the buffer.

It should read:

sent = send(source, buff+totalst, size-totalst, 0);

Likewise for the recv case:

rec = recv(source, buff + totalrc, size-totalrc, 0);

I'm not sure if this is causing your issue, but I have a feeling when the scenario pointed out by todda is true, then your data streams are getting corrupted by this bug.

Make sense? Also, you should be prepared to handle the case where recv() will return 0.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.