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A recent question here made use of the default keyword in non-generic code that interests me:

StreamReader r = default(StreamReader);

What is the purpose served here? How is this different from:

StreamReader r;

Both statements define r. In 'SLaks' answer below, he clarifies that the use of default additionally sets r to null, but that could be done explicitly by just using null. Is this a style issue, or is there some utility served?

I have used default in generic code (and, of course, in switch statement blocks) but do not understand it's purpose in this usage.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's different from StreamReader r; in that it assigns the variable. It's (completely) identical to StreamReader r = null;.

For reference types, default(T) compiles to null.
For value types, default(T) compiles to new T().

C#'s default(T) keyword is actually equivalent to VB.Net's Nothing keyword.

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Right. I got that far reading elsewhere. What is the purpose of writing null in this verbose manner? –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 25 '12 at 23:59
    
@KevinR: None. They compile identically. –  SLaks Jan 25 '12 at 23:59
    
So, you are saying this is just a style choice. Except that I did read elsewhere that auto-generated code templates might output code like this, but I would presume it was hand-written in the S.O. question I linked to (where I saw this code). Any guess why one would prefer such a style? It seems an overly explicit way to just say null. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 26 '12 at 0:03
    
Yes, and a dumb choice, IMHO. This can be useful for code generators if the generator doesn't know whether a type is a struct or not. –  SLaks Jan 26 '12 at 0:04
1  
It may have been copied from auto-generated code by someone who didn't understand it. –  SLaks Jan 26 '12 at 0:11

The expression default(T) produces the default value for a type generic or not. For reference types it will be null and for value types it will be a 0 initialization. While it's most useful in generic code it's still usable, if often a bit verbose, in regular code.

For example. The following groups of lines are all equivalent

StreamReader r = null;
StreamReader r = default(StreamReader);
var r = default(StreamReader);

int i = 0;
int i = default(int);
var i = default(int);
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Same comment as to SLaks below-- You are saying this is just a style choice? I did read elsewhere that auto-generated code templates might output code like this, but I would presume it was hand-written in the S.O. question I linked to (where I saw this code). Any reasoning why one would prefer such a style? It seems an overly explicit way to just say null. –  Kevin P. Rice Jan 26 '12 at 0:04
    
@KevinP.Rice There is certainly a case to be made for code generators choosing this as it's more universal. But at it's core it's a style choice (one you wouldn't ever catch me doing though). –  JaredPar Jan 26 '12 at 4:13

var r = default(StreamReader); might make some sense, especially if you were trying to develop a coding habit. Other than that the only advantage I could see, is if at some point in the future StreamReader's default might no longer be null, which seems unlikely.....

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That's not just unlikely; it will never happen. –  SLaks Jan 29 '12 at 6:58
    
This is IT. You'll never use up 640k. Change is given. BeSides I was alluding to the thinking behind the foolishness. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 29 '12 at 13:30

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