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I have a Backbone View for a general element that specific elements will be inheriting from. I have event handling logic that needs to be applied to all elements, and event handling logic that is specific to child-type elements. I'm having trouble because a child View has its own callback for an event that is also handled by the parent View, and so when I try to use the events hash in both, either the child or parent callback is never called. Let me illustrate with some code:

var ElementView = Backbone.View.extend({
  events: {
    "mouseup": "upHandler",
    "mousedown": "downHandler",
    "mousemove": "moveHandler"
  },

  initialize: function() {
    // add events from child
    if (this.events)
      this.events = _.defaults(this.events, ElementView.prototype.events);

    this.delegateEvents(this.events);
  }
});

var StrokeView = ElementView.extend({
  events: {
    "mousemove": "strokeMoveHandler"
  }
});

How would I solve this in an extensible way, especially if I will later have another level of inheritance?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way to handle this would be to use "namespaces" for events:

var ElementView = Backbone.View.extend({
  events: {
    "mouseup.element": "upHandler",
    "mousedown.element": "downHandler",
    "mousemove.element": "moveHandler"
  },

  initialize: function() {
    // add events from child
    if (this.events)
      this.events = _.defaults(this.events, ElementView.prototype.events);

    this.delegateEvents(this.events);
  }
});

var StrokeView = ElementView.extend({
  events: {
    "mousemove.strokeview": "strokeMoveHandler"
  }
});

In fact, this approach is suggested in Backbone.js documentation.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good suggestion, although I think your events and namespaces are reversed. Shouldn't it be "mouseup:element"? – Rob Hruska Jan 26 '12 at 1:34
    
@RobHruska That's not what documentation suggests and also examples "in the wild" point to my suggested usage. Ultimately, it is up to you how you want to structure your event names. – Arnold Zokas Jan 26 '12 at 1:38
1  
That's cool. I don't use them very often, and was mainly just going off of other examples I've seen, mainly how jQuery does it: docs.jquery.com/Namespaced_Events. – Rob Hruska Jan 26 '12 at 1:43
1  
Since I'm listening to events that the browser is firing, I'm not naming the events, so if I try namespacing them the handler is not being called. However, when I switched the names to be in the form @RobHruska suggested (except with a . instead of a :), i.e. mousemove.stroke, it worked. – troyastorino Jan 26 '12 at 20:29
    
@troyastorino I use backbone events mostly for custom events, so I wasn't aware of that. Useful to know. – Arnold Zokas Jan 26 '12 at 20:48

I've done something similiar by taking advantage of JavaScript's faux-super as mentioned in the Backbone.js documentation and the initialization function

var ElementView = Backbone.View.extend({
  events: {
    "mouseup": "upHandler",
    "mousedown": "downHandler",
    "mousemove": "moveHandler"
  },

  initialize: function() {
    this.delegateEvents();
  }
});

var StrokeView = ElementView.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    this.events = _.extend({}, this.events, {
      "mousemove": "strokeMoveHandler"
    });

    // Call the parent's initialization function
    ElementView.prototype.initialize.call(this);
  }
});

var SubStrokeView = StrokeView.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    this.events = _.extend({}, this.events, {
      "click": "subStrokeClickHandler",
      "mouseup": "subStrokeMouseupHandler"
    });

    // Call the parent's initialization function
    StrokeView.prototype.initialize.call(this);
  }
});

var c = new SubStrokeView();
console.log(c.events);

// Should be something like
// click: "subStrokeClickHandler"
// mousedown: "downHandler"
// mousemove: "strokeMoveHandler"
// mouseup: "subStrokeMouseupHandler"

The magic happens by setting the events within the initialize function. If you have multiple events attributes in your prototypes, JavaScript will only see the one set most recently due to how prototyping works.

Instead, by doing it this way, each view sets its own this.events, then calls its parent's initialize function which in turn extends this.events with its events, and so on.

You do need to set this.events in this specific way:

this.events = _.extend({}, this.events, ...new events...);

instead of

_.extend(this.events, ...new events...);

Doing it the second way will munge the events object within the parent's (ElementView) prototype. The first way ensures each model gets its own copy.

share|improve this answer
    
I do like this solution, but unfortunately it doesn't deal with the issue that I want both moveHandler and strokeMoveHandler to be called on mouse move events. – troyastorino Jan 26 '12 at 20:21
    
@troyastorino: The proper way to handle that use case is to call the parent method from within your child method. For example: strokeMoveHandler: function() { ElementView.prototype.moveHandler.call(this); // do strokeMoveHandler stuff } – T Nguyen Oct 20 '13 at 16:12

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