Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a custom class containing 2 public variables: 1 is a string and 1 is an integer. I then make a list of this class, in the list I need the string of the class to be unique, if the string already exists in the list I don't want to add it again but I do want to combine the corresponding integers. here is an example of the custom class and list.

public class myItems
{
    public string itemName;
    public int count;
}

List<myItems> items = new List<myItems>();

myItems e = new myItems();
e.symbol = "pencil";
e.count = 3;
items.Add(e);

myItems e1 = new myItems();
e1.symbol = "eraser";
e1.count = 4;
items.Add(e1);

myItems e2 = new myItems();
e1.symbol = "pencil";
e1.count = 3;
items.Add(e5);

So for the final list i want to it contain: pencil 7, eraser 4. I have been using the contains function on the list to check if it already exists but it only returns true if both the string and integer are the same.

Is there a way to only match on the string?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another way to do it would be to use LINQ:

public class myItems
{
    public string itemName;
    public int count;
}

List<myItems> items = new List<myItems>();

myItems e = new myItems();
e.symbol = "pencil";
e.count = 3;
Add(items, e);

myItems e1 = new myItems();
e1.symbol = "eraser";
e1.count = 4;
Add(items, e1);

myItems e2 = new myItems();
e1.symbol = "pencil";
e1.count = 3;
Add(items, e5);

public void Add(List<myItems> list, myItems newItem)
{
    var item = list.SingleOrDefault(x => x.symbol == newItem.symbol);

    if(item != null)
    {
        item.count += newItem.count;
    }
    else
    {
        list.Add(newItem);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A dictionary might be well suited for this problem:

readonly Dictionary<string, int> _dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();

void InsertOrUpdate(string name, int count)
{
    int previousCount = 0;

    // item already in dictionary?
    if (_dict.TryGetValue(name, out previousCount))
    {
        // add to count
        count += previousCount;
    }

    _dict[name] = count;
}

void Main()
{
    InsertOrUpdate("pencil", 3);
    InsertOrUpdate("eraser", 3);
    InsertOrUpdate("pencil", 4);

    // print them
    foreach (var item in _dict)
        Console.WriteLine(item.Key + " " + item.Value);
}
share|improve this answer

You could add an Equals method to your class, or use LINQ with something like

items.Where(i => i.itemName == "pencil")

However, if all you are doing is keeping track of how many 'items' you have, would a Dictionary that maps itemNames to counts solve your problem easier? Then you would be able to do things like

// Assuming you want to add a new 'pencil' with a count of 3
int oldCount = 0;
items.TryGetValue("pencil", out oldCount);

items["pencil"] = oldCount + 3;

Usually see something like this called a Bag

share|improve this answer

Sure, write a custom Equals method

public override bool Equals(object o)
{
    MyItems mi = o as MyItems;
    if (mi == null)
        return false;
    if (itemName == null)
        return mi.itemName == null;
    return itemName.Equals(mi.itemName);
}

public override int HashCode()
{
    return (itemName ?? string.Empty).HashCode();
}

That being said, you really should be using a dictionary/hash table instead, since a dictionary provides much faster lookup when you know what you want. A List implementation will cause the list to be searched in its entirety every time you want to add a MyItem to the list.

share|improve this answer

when you check if it contains and it returs true than you get the index and add the number to it. use that logic. it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't get to the core problem, which is that the default C# equality check just checks for reference equality, not value equality. –  Adam Mihalcin Jan 26 '12 at 1:42
    
@amitpatel yes that was what I was trying but it will only return true if the symbol and count are the same such as: pencil 4, pencil 4, would return true, but pencil 4, pencil 3, would return false because the numbers dont match as well –  Beef Jan 26 '12 at 1:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.