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Why is the Inherited Class not exposed when I use this WCF Service Class?

[ServiceContract]
public interface IMyService
{
    [OperationContract] void DoSomething();
}

[DataContract]
public abstract class InheritMe
{
    [DataMember] public int ExposeMe { get; set; }
}

public class MyService : InheritMe, IMyService
{
    public void DoSomething() { }
}

My code is in C#, in Framework 4, build in Visual Studio 2010 Pro.

Please help, Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
what exactly do you mean by not exposed? –  Petar Ivanov Jan 26 '12 at 2:07
    
In client application, the ExposeMe DataMember is not exposed. –  John Isaiah Carmona Jan 26 '12 at 2:11
    
Why would you want to make your service class a data contract? –  RQDQ Jan 26 '12 at 2:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ExposeMe is not part of the service contract. If you expect to be able to call it in client applicaitons, then you have to define it in the contract interface IMyService.

It's is a little wierd to have your service class (MyService) inherit from a DataContract. This serves no purpose. DataContact classes are classes that you can communicate to the client (by returning them from your service operations for example). The MyService class is just the implementation of your service contract - it is not visible to the client.

share|improve this answer
    
There were methods in the InheritMe class that uses the ExposeMe property in my actual code. Thanks, I'll try what you suggest. –  John Isaiah Carmona Jan 26 '12 at 2:20
    
It works, but unfortunately, I remember that MySqlCommand.MySqlTransaction is not serializable. Haha. Thanks again. –  John Isaiah Carmona Jan 26 '12 at 2:24

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