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The pointer passed into the "menuItem" methode is alloc and for the "Pointer Inside" a value is registered. But for the "Pointer Outside" the value is "null" ... why? I passed in the pointer and it should had been modified in the method?

In the header file:

UIButton *bMenu_time;
UILabel *lMenu_time;

Implementation:

- (void) menuItem: (UIView*)vMenu  menuButton:(UIButton*)bMenu menuLabel: (UILabel*)lMenu  menuPosX: (double)posX   menuLenX: (double)lenX  menuTagNum: (int)tagNum menuText: (NSString*)txtMenu{

    bMenu = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
    [bMenu setFrame:CGRectMake(posX,0,lenX,25)];
    [bMenu setTag: tagNum];
    [bMenu addTarget:pSelf action:@selector(NewNumber:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
    [vMenu addSubview:bMenu];


    lMenu = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(posX,0,lenX,25)];
    [lMenu setBackgroundColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor]];
    [lMenu setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:  txtMenu]];
    [lMenu setFont:[UIFont systemFontOfSize:14 ]];
    [lMenu setTextAlignment:UITextAlignmentCenter];
    [vMenu addSubview: lMenu];

    NSLog(@"\nPointer Inside: %@\n", lMenu); // <--------- INSIDE WORKS
}



- (void) menuBuild{     
    pSelf = self;
    theString = @"";


    vMenu = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0,320,25)];
    [pSelf.view addSubview:vMenu];
    [vMenu setBackgroundColor:[UIColor grayColor]]; 


    iTime = 2;
    [self menuItem:vMenu menuButton:bMenu_time menuLabel:lMenu_time menuPosX:240+20 menuLenX:60 menuTagNum:102  menuText:[NSString stringWithFormat:  @"Hold: %d", iTime]];

    NSLog(@"\nPointer Outside: %@\n", lMenu_time); // <----- OUTSIDE is NULL ??
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

paxdiablo is absolutely right, but in case you're uncertain of the syntax for pass-by-reference, here is what your code should be:

- (void) menuItem: (UIView*)vMenu  menuButton:(UIButton **)bMenu menuLabel: (UILabel **)lMenu  menuPosX: (double)posX   menuLenX: (double)lenX  menuTagNum: (int)tagNum menuText: (NSString*)txtMenu{

    *bMenu = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
    [*bMenu setFrame:CGRectMake(posX,0,lenX,25)];
    [*bMenu setTag: tagNum];
    [*bMenu addTarget:pSelf action:@selector(NewNumber:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
    [vMenu addSubview:*bMenu];


    *lMenu = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(posX,0,lenX,25)];
    [*lMenu setBackgroundColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor]];
    [*lMenu setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:  txtMenu]];
    [*lMenu setFont:[UIFont systemFontOfSize:14 ]];
    [*lMenu setTextAlignment:UITextAlignmentCenter];
    [vMenu addSubview: *lMenu];

    NSLog(@"\nPointer Inside: %@\n", *lMenu); // <--------- INSIDE WORKS
}



- (void) menuBuild{     
    pSelf = self;
    theString = @"";


    vMenu = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0,320,25)];
    [pSelf.view addSubview:vMenu];
    [vMenu setBackgroundColor:[UIColor grayColor]]; 


    iTime = 2;
    [self menuItem:vMenu menuButton:&bMenu_time menuLabel:&lMenu_time menuPosX:240+20 menuLenX:60 menuTagNum:102  menuText:[NSString stringWithFormat:  @"Hold: %d", iTime]];

    NSLog(@"\nPointer Outside: %@\n", lMenu_time); // <----- OUTSIDE is NULL ??
}

Things to note:

  1. objects passed by reference in the method parameters use **
  2. to pass the address of an object to one of these parameters, use &object when calling the method
  3. to refer to an object that is passed by reference, prefix the variable with *

Have a look at how iOS uses error parameters in methods like NSString initWithContentsOfFile:error: for more examples of how this approach is used.

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ok... this worked. But I passed in pointers. Why the double pointer? Also with this I get tons of warnings: Incompatible pointer types sending "UILabel **" to parameter of type "UILabel *" –  jdl Jan 26 '12 at 3:25
1  
To get rid of the warnings you'll need to update the method definition in your .h to match the .m with ** for menuButton and menuLabel –  Nick Lockwood Jan 26 '12 at 7:41
1  
The reason for the double pointer is because of the pass-by-value thing that paxdiablo was trying to explain. When you pass your pointer in it is nil, then you assign an object to it the pointer needs to change to not-nil. Since pointers are passed by value, you cannot change the pointer from nil to not-nil. You have to pass a pointer to the pointer if you want to change the value of the original pointer itself. Think of a pointer as an integer - if you pass an integer to a function would you expect the function to be able to change it's value? No - you'd have to pass a pointer to the integer! –  Nick Lockwood Jan 26 '12 at 7:48
    
I have passed pointers before without passing in with an extra star. But they worked before because I did memory allocation prior. Values got updated in the function. So why can't the allocation be done without the double pointer ?? –  jdl Jan 26 '12 at 18:12
1  
when you change the properties of an object, it doesn't change its pointer. When you create an object, it does change it's pointer. Think about it; You have a pointer to an object. The pointer is a number of a place in memory. You set a property on the object and it changes the internals of the object but it doesn't move it to a different place in memory, so the pointer doesn't need to change. But if you don't have an object yet, your pointer is nil. If you pass a nil pointer to a function you are just passing the literal value zero to the method. You can't change the value zero. –  Nick Lockwood Jan 26 '12 at 19:17

Objective C, like C, is pass by value. That means, if you want to change a pointer by passing it to a function, you need to pass a pointer to the pointer and use that.

In C, that would be something like:

void alloc128 (void **ptr) {
    *ptr = malloc (128);
}

Mapping that to your specific case, you can:

  • modify menuBuild to pass the address of the things you want to change.
  • modify the function to receive the pointer-to-pointer values.
  • modify the function to dereference the pointer-to-point values to set them correctly.
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