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I tried to make inheritance, but I didn't expect that this.array will act like static member. How can I make it 'protected/public':

function A() {
    this.array = [];
}

function B() {
    this.array.push(1);
}
B.prototype.constructor=B;
B.prototype = new A();

Firebug:

>>> b = new B();
A { array=[1]}
>>> b = new B();
A { array=[2]}
>>> b = new B()
A { array=[3]}
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Your last two lines are backwards, by the way. Set prototype.constructor after you set prototype. –  minitech Jan 26 '12 at 2:33
    
I realize this is just an example, but why don't you do this.array = [1] instead? –  minitech Jan 26 '12 at 2:35
    
Original code looks like: function Controller(uri) { this._controllerURI = uri; this._controllers = []; this._views = []; this._events = []; }. It's just a sample. –  DraganS Jan 26 '12 at 2:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not "private/protected", but this will make a new Array for each B.

function A() {
    this.array = [];
}

function B() {
    A.apply(this); // apply the A constructor to the new object
    this.array.push(1);
}
// B.prototype.constructor=B; // pointless
B.prototype = new A();
share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean A.call(this);. –  minitech Jan 26 '12 at 2:37
    
@user(\d)* Perfect. Thanks. @minitech: could be apply - it works. Where I can find docs/sample code for your $Query replacement? –  DraganS Jan 26 '12 at 2:40

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