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I apologize if this has been asked here - I've hunted around here and in the Tentative NumPy Tutorial for an answer.

I have 2 numpy arrays. The first array is similar to:

1 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 0

4 0 0 0 0

5 0 0 0 0

6 0 0 0 0

7 0 0 0 0

8 0 0 0 0

(etc... It's ~700x10 in actuality)

I then have a 2nd array similar to

3 1

4 18

5 2

(again, longer - maybe 400 or so rows)

The first column of the 2nd array is always completely contained within the first column of the first array

What I'd like to do is to insert the 2nd column of the 2nd array into that first array as part of an existing column, i.e:

array a:

1 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0

3 1 0 0 0

4 18 0 0 0

5 2 0 0 0

6 0 0 0 0

7 0 0 0 0

8 0 0 0 0

(I'd be filling in each of those columns in turn, but each covers a different range within the original)

My first try was along the lines of a[b[:,0],1]=b[:,1] which puts them into the indices of b, not the values (ie, in my example above instead of filling in rows 3, 4, and 5, I filled in 2, 3, and 4). I should have realized that!

Since then, I've tried to make it work pretty inelegantly with where(), and I think I could make it work by finding the difference in the starting values of the first columns.

I'm new to python, so perhaps I'm overly optimistic - but it seems like there should be a more elegant way and I'm just missing it.

Thanks for any insights!

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If the numbers in the first column of a are in sorted order, then you could use

a[a[:,0].searchsorted(b[:,0]),1] = b[:,1]

For example:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([(1,0,0,0,0),
              (2,0,0,0,0),
              (3,0,0,0,0),
              (4,0,0,0,0),
              (5,0,0,0,0),
              (6,0,0,0,0),
              (7,0,0,0,0),
              (8,0,0,0,0),
              ])

b = np.array([(3, 1),
              (5, 18),
              (7, 2)])

a[a[:,0].searchsorted(b[:,0]),1] = b[:,1]
print(a)

yields

[[ 1  0  0  0  0]
 [ 2  0  0  0  0]
 [ 3  1  0  0  0]
 [ 4  0  0  0  0]
 [ 5 18  0  0  0]
 [ 6  0  0  0  0]
 [ 7  2  0  0  0]
 [ 8  0  0  0  0]]

(I changed your example a bit to show that the values in b's first column do not have to be contiguous.)


If a[:,0] is not in sorted order, then you could use np.argsort to workaround this:

a = np.array( [(1,0,0,0,0),
               (2,0,0,0,0),
               (5,0,0,0,0),
               (3,0,0,0,0),
               (4,0,0,0,0),
               (6,0,0,0,0),
               (7,0,0,0,0),
               (8,0,0,0,0),
               ])

b = np.array([(3, 1),
              (5, 18),
              (7, 2)])

perm = np.argsort(a[:,0])
a[:,1][perm[a[:,0][perm].searchsorted(b[:,0])]] = b[:,1]
print(a)

yields

[[ 1  0  0  0  0]
 [ 2  0  0  0  0]
 [ 5 18  0  0  0]
 [ 3  1  0  0  0]
 [ 4  0  0  0  0]
 [ 6  0  0  0  0]
 [ 7  2  0  0  0]
 [ 8  0  0  0  0]]
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searchsorted? These guys are creative. Looks like 'exactely' what the OP wanted. +1 –  heltonbiker Jan 26 '12 at 2:55
    
a[a[:,0].searchsorted(b[:,0]),1] = b[:,1] is just what I needed - I knew there had to be a more elegant way. Thanks! –  Topher Hughes Jan 26 '12 at 17:02
    
@TopherHughes Please accept unutbu's answer if it works for you. –  nye17 Aug 19 '12 at 18:09
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The setup:

a = np.arange(20).reshape(2,10).T
b = np.array([[1, 100], [3, 300], [8, 800]])

This will work if you don't know anything about a[:, 0] except that it is sorted.

index = a[:, 0].searchsorted(b[:, 0])
a[index, 1] = b[:, 1]
print a
array([[  0,  10],
       [  1, 100],
       [  2,  12],
       [  3, 300],
       [  4,  14],
       [  5,  15],
       [  6,  16],
       [  7,  17],
       [  8, 800],
       [  9,  19]])

But if you know that a[:, 0] is a sequence of contiguous integers like your example you can do:

index = b[:,0] + a[0, 0]
a[index, 1] = b[:, 1]
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searchsorted is just what I needed - thank you very much –  Topher Hughes Jan 26 '12 at 17:03
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