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Given these values for the boolean variables x, y, and z:

x = true
y = false
z = true

Why does the following logical expression evaluate to true?

(x || !y) && (!x || z)
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(true||true) && (false || true) is true So where do you have the problem ? –  abhiasawa Jan 26 '12 at 3:19
    
Should this be tagged as homework? –  David Hoerster Jan 26 '12 at 3:20
1  
@DavidHoerster I don't think this is a homework problem. Even professors wouldn't give such simple problems :P –  abhiasawa Jan 26 '12 at 3:21
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Substitute in the values of x, y, and z:

(true || !false) && (!true || true)

Flip the negated values:

(true || true) && (false || true)

Replace the ORed statements (if one side is true, the whole statement is true):

true && true

Replace the ANDed statement (if both sides are true, the whole statement is true):

true
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True or False is always True. true || false True and True is always True. true && true

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(x || !y) && (!x || z)
= (T || !F) && (!T || T) <-- plug in x = T, y = F, z = T
= (T || T) && (F || T) <-- !F = T, !T = F
= T && T <- T || T = T, F || T = T
= T <- T && T = T

Actually, please tell us what's so confusing; I am slightly confused that you find it confusing at all.

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X is true in the first grouping causing the first grouping to be true. Z is true in the second grouping causing the second grouping to be true. Therefore group 1 and group 2 are true.

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