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I have a method whose purpose is to retrieve collection items.

A collection can contain a mix of items, let's say: pens, pencils, and papers.

The 1st parameter allows me to tell the method to retrieve only the itemTypes I pass (e.g, just pens and pencils).

The 2nd parameter flags the function to use the collection's default item types, instead.

getCollectionItems($itemTypes,$useCollectionDefaultItemTypes) {
    foreach() {
        foreach() {
            foreach() {
               // lots of code...

               if($useCollectionDefaultItemTypes) {
                 // get collection's items using collection->itemTypes
               }
               else {
                 // get collection's items using $itemTypes
               }

               // lots of code...
            }
        }    
    }
}

What feels odd is that if I set the $useCollectionDefaultItemTypes to true, there is no need for the function to use the first parameter. I was considering refactoring this method into two such as:

getCollectionItems($itemTypes); // get the items using $itemTypes
getCollectionItems(); // get the items using default settings

The problem is that the methods will have lots of duplicate code except for the if-statement area.

Is there a better way to optimize this?

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1  
In what language? –  SLaks Jan 26 '12 at 4:04
    
This was originally PHP, but I was pseudo-coding it for the purposes of illustration. –  jexx2345 Jan 26 '12 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

Pass in $itemTypes as null when you're not using it. Have your if statement check if $itemTypes === null; if it is, use default settings.

If this is php, which I assume it is, you can make your method signature function getCollectionItems($itemTypes = null) and then you can call getCollectionItems() and it will call it as if you had typed getCollectionItems(null).

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It's generally a bad idea to write methods that use flags like that. I've seen that written in several places (here at #16, Uncle Bob here and elsewhere). It makes the method hard to understand, read, and refactor.

An alternative design would be to use closures. Your code could look something like this:

$specificWayOfProcessing = function($a) {
  //do something with each $a
};

getCollectionItems($processer) {
  foreach() {
    foreach() {
      foreach() {
        // lots of code...
        $processor(...)
        // lots of code...
      }
    }    
  }
}

getCollectionItems($specificWayOfProcessing);

This design is better because

  1. It's more flexible. What happens when you need to decide between three different things?
  2. You can now test the code inside the loop much easier
  3. It is now easier to read, because the last line tells you that you are "getting collection items using a specific way of processing" - it reads like an English sentence.
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Thanks for your response. I really like the emphasis on organization here. –  jexx2345 Jan 26 '12 at 17:01

Yes, there is a better way of doing this -- though this question is not an optimization question, but a style question. (Duplicated code has little effect on performance!)

The simplest way to implement this along the lines of your original idea is to make the no-argument form of getCollectionItems() define the default arguments, and then call the version of it that requires an argument:

getCollectionItems($itemTypes) {
    foreach() {
        foreach() {
            foreach() {
                // lots of code...
                // get collection's items using $itemTypes
            }
            // lots of code...
        }
    }    
}

getCollectionItems() {
    getCollectionItems(collection->itemTypes)
}

Depending on what language you are using, you may even be able to collapse these into a single function definition with a default argument:

getCollectionItems($itemTypes = collection->itemTypes) {
    foreach() {
        foreach() {
            foreach() {
                // lots of code...
                // get collection's items using $itemTypes
            }
            // lots of code...
        }
    }    
}

That has the advantage of clearly expressing your original idea, which is that you use $itemTypes if provided, and collection->itemTypes if not.

(This does, of course, assume that you're talking about a single "collection", rather than having one of those foreach iterations be iterating over collections. If you are, the idea to use a null value is a good one.)

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