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I wanna to write code like this

require 'sinatra'

class MyModel
    def edit(request)
        # ...
        updateOK = true
        redirect '/article_view' if updateOK

        :article_edit
    end
end

get '/article_view' do erb :article_view end
get '/article_edit' do erb :article_edit end

post '/article_edit' do
    model = MyModel.new
    erb model.edit(request)
end

but it dosn't work, it tips that: undefined method `redirect' for #<MyModel:0x24e3910>

Is there any way to invoke redirect method in the my custom model?


Haha, I know how to make the code works, despite it write in wrong way.

require 'sinatra'

class MyModel
    def edit(context)
        # ...
        updateOK = true
        context.redirect '/article_view' if updateOK

        :article_edit
    end
end

get '/' do erb :index end
get '/article_view' do erb :article_view end
get '/article_edit' do erb :article_edit end

post '/article_edit' do
    model = MyModel.new
    erb model.edit(self)
end
share|improve this question
3  
You should not do this. The Model should not know anything about URLs. That's the job of the controller (routes, in Sinatra parlance). – Phrogz Jan 26 '12 at 7:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't. The model is not responsible for routing or redirecting.

Also, your post route looks borked. You are sending POST data to it which it then passes to the model. The model is created and saved. You can split up these two and if the model.save method returns true you redirect.

post '/model/new' do
  model = Model.new params
  redirect to("/model/#{model.id}") if model.save
end

Not everybody likes to forfard params to the model, so be careful about that too.

For edits you'd normally use the PUT method because you know the models address. So be careful to not mix them up (unless you know what you're doing) It will save you a lot of thinking.

share|improve this answer
    
The answer don't solve the problem directly, but it's a good answer. – Tony Jan 27 '12 at 3:06
    
of course it doesn't but your original question was leading nowhere. – three Jan 27 '12 at 10:52

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