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Using Solve function in Mathematica, we may get several solutions, e.g.

    In[1]:= Solve[x == 1 &&  2 >= y >= 1, {x, y}, Integers]
    Out[1]= {{x -> 1, y -> 1}, {x -> 1, y -> 2}}

In case there are tens of solutions, the lists above will be messy. Now I want to list only all possible values of x and y with a list like this

    {x->1, y->1,2}

Is there any easy way to reformat the output of the solution?

Another question, how to use the value from a solution?

    In[1]:= Solve[x == 1,{x}]
    Out[1]= {x -> 1}
    In[2]:= x
    Out[2]= x
    In[3]:= Definition[x]
    Out[3]= Null
    In[4]:= ?x
            Global`x
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what language is it? –  Eric Yin Jan 26 '12 at 7:25
    
@EricYin, Mathematica. –  rcollyer Jan 26 '12 at 11:19
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For your first question you might use:

vars = {x, y};

sols = Solve[x == 1 && 2 >= y >= 1, vars, Integers];

Thread[ vars -> Union /@ (vars /. sols) ]
{x -> {1}, y -> {1, 2}}

For your second question please see this answer.

Most handily:

sols = Solve[x^2 + a x + 1 == 0, x]

MapIndexed[(gg[#2[[1]]][a_] := #) &, x /. sols];

This makes assignments to the symbol gg.
The function is then used with the syntax gg[1][17] to mean the first solution, and a == 17:

Plot[gg[1][a], {a, 1, 4}]

Mathematica graphics

gg[2] /@ {1, 2, 3}
{1/2 (-1 + I Sqrt[3]), -1, 1/2 (-3 + Sqrt[5])}
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Thank you Mr.Wizard, voted. –  Osiris Xu Jan 26 '12 at 19:55
    
@Osiris you're welcome and thanks for the accept. –  Mr.Wizard Jan 26 '12 at 19:58
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The lists follow the pattern of Mathematica rules, and therefore list replacement is the easiest way to get values from such lists.

Let's call the solution list sol:

In[3]:= sol = Solve[x == 1 && 2 >= y >= 1, {x, y}, Integers]
Out[3]= {{x -> 1, y -> 1}, {x -> 1, y -> 2}}

Now take symbol x, and make the list of all replacements of x according to sol treated as a rule list:

In[4]:= x /. sol
Out[4]= {1, 1}

This immediately gives you an idea how to get all distinct values of x from all solutions:

In[5]:= Union[x /. sol]
Out[5]= {1}

Ditto for y, although all solutions are already distinct:

In[6]:= Union[y /. sol]
Out[6]= {1, 2}

Here's complete code from the above step-through for copying and pasting:

sol = Solve[x == 1 && 2 >= y >= 1, {x, y}, Integers]
x /. sol
Union[x /. sol]
Union[y /. sol]
Clear[sol]
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Nice. Thank you, kkm. –  Osiris Xu Jan 26 '12 at 19:54
    
There is a new Mathematica only site, that you may be interested in. –  rcollyer Jan 28 '12 at 3:20
    
@rcollyer: I know already, thanks! –  kkm Jan 28 '12 at 9:11
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You can transform the rules returned by Solve into lists by using ReplaceAll or its short form /. as follows

Solve[x == 1 && 2 >= y >= 1, {x, y}, Integers] /.  Rule[a_, b_] -> b  

This produces a list of lists: {{1, 1}, {1, 2}}. To get the results in the format you desire you can pass this list through a function that takes a pair {a,b} and returns {x->a,y->b}. A function like

  {x -> #[[1]], y -> #[[2]]} &

does does exactly this tranformation. Combining the two steps

 solutionlist = (Solve[x == 1 && 2 >= y >= 1, {x, y}, Integers] /. 
       Rule[a_, b_] -> b ) // {x -> #[[1]], y -> #[[2]]} &

produces

 {x -> {1, 1}, y -> {1, 2}}

for your example case.

To use the values from the solution, you can use

{xlist, ylist} = {x, y} /. solutionlist

Checking

 ?xlist

gives

output for ?xlist

EDIT: To delete duplicates change the function {x -> #[[1]], y -> #[[2]]} & to

 {x -> Union@#[[1]], y -> Union@#[[2]]} &
share|improve this answer
    
Got your idea. voted :o) –  Osiris Xu Jan 26 '12 at 19:57
    
Thank you @Oziris. –  kguler Jan 26 '12 at 20:02
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