Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using this (simplified) chunk of code to extract a set of tables from SQL Server with bcp.

$OutputDirectory = "c:\junk\" 
$ServerOption =   "-SServerName"    
$TargetDatabase = "Content.dbo."

$ExtractTables = @(
    "Page"
    , "ChecklistItemCategory"
    , "ChecklistItem"
    )

for ($i=0; $i -le $ExtractTables.Length – 1; $i++)  {
    $InputFullTableName = "$TargetDatabase$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    $OutputFullFileName = "$OutputDirectory$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
}

It works great, but now some of the tables need to be extracted via views, and some don't. So I need a data structure something like this:

"Page"                      "vExtractPage"
, "ChecklistItemCategory"   "ChecklistItemCategory"
, "ChecklistItem"           "vExtractChecklistItem"

I was looking at hashes, but I'm not finding anything on how to loop through a hash. What would be the right thing to do here? Perhaps just use an array, but with both values, separated by space?

Or am I missing something obvious?

thanks for your help!

Sylvia

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Christian's answer works well and shows how you can loop through each hash table item using the GetEnumerator method. You can also loop through using the keys property. Here is an example how:

$hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}
$hash.Keys | % { "key = $_ , value = " + $hash.Item($_) }

Output:

key = c , value = 3
key = a , value = 1
key = b , value = 2
share|improve this answer

Shorthand is not preferred for Scripts -- less readable. The %{} operator is considered shorthand. Here's how it should be done in a Script for readability and reusability:

$hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}

Results:

PS> $hash

Name                           Value
----                           -----
c                              3
b                              2
a                              1

The GetEnumerator() method would be done as shown (personal preference -- simpler syntax):

foreach ($h in $hash.GetEnumerator()) {
    Write-Host "$($h.Name): $($h.Value)"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

The Keys method would be done as shown:

foreach ($h in $hash.Keys) {
    Write-Host "${h}: $($hash.Item($h))"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

Additional bit: Be careful sorting your hashtable ... Sort-Object may change it to an array:

PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Hashtable                                System.Object


PS> $hash = $hash.GetEnumerator() | Sort-Object Name
PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Object[]                                 System.Array
share|improve this answer
    
like this one more for readability, especially for not dedicate powershell developers like me. –  anIBMer Aug 20 at 13:32

About loop through an hash:

$Q = @{"ONE"="1";"TWO"="2";"THREE"="3"}
$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.VALUE }
1
3
2

$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.key }
ONE
THREE
TWO
share|improve this answer

If you're using PowerShell v3, you can use JSON instead of a hashtable, and convert it to an object with Convert-FromJson:

@'
[
    {
        FileName = "Page";
        ObjectName = "vExtractPage";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItemCategory";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItem";
    },
]
'@ | 
    Convert-FromJson |
    ForEach-Object {
        $InputFullTableName = '{0}{1}' -f $TargetDatabase,$_.ObjectName

        # In strict mode, you can't reference a property that doesn't exist, 
        #so check if it has an explicit filename firest.
        $outputFileName = $_.ObjectName
        if( $_ | Get-Member FileName )
        {
            $outputFileName = $_.FileName
        }
        $OutputFullFileName = Join-Path $OutputDirectory $outputFileName

        bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.