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I'm using this (simplified) chunk of code to extract a set of tables from SQL Server with bcp.

$OutputDirectory = "c:\junk\" 
$ServerOption =   "-SServerName"    
$TargetDatabase = "Content.dbo."

$ExtractTables = @(
    "Page"
    , "ChecklistItemCategory"
    , "ChecklistItem"
    )

for ($i=0; $i -le $ExtractTables.Length – 1; $i++)  {
    $InputFullTableName = "$TargetDatabase$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    $OutputFullFileName = "$OutputDirectory$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
}

It works great, but now some of the tables need to be extracted via views, and some don't. So I need a data structure something like this:

"Page"                      "vExtractPage"
, "ChecklistItemCategory"   "ChecklistItemCategory"
, "ChecklistItem"           "vExtractChecklistItem"

I was looking at hashes, but I'm not finding anything on how to loop through a hash. What would be the right thing to do here? Perhaps just use an array, but with both values, separated by space?

Or am I missing something obvious?

thanks for your help!

Sylvia

share|improve this question
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Christian's answer works well and shows how you can loop through each hash table item using the GetEnumerator method. You can also loop through using the keys property. Here is an example how:

$hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}
$hash.Keys | % { "key = $_ , value = " + $hash.Item($_) }

Output:

key = c , value = 3
key = a , value = 1
key = b , value = 2
share|improve this answer

Shorthand is not preferred for Scripts -- less readable. The %{} operator is considered shorthand. Here's how it should be done in a Script for readability and reusability:

$hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}

Results:

PS> $hash

Name                           Value
----                           -----
c                              3
b                              2
a                              1

The GetEnumerator() method would be done as shown (personal preference -- simpler syntax):

foreach ($h in $hash.GetEnumerator()) {
    Write-Host "$($h.Name): $($h.Value)"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

The Keys method would be done as shown:

foreach ($h in $hash.Keys) {
    Write-Host "${h}: $($hash.Item($h))"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

Additional bit: Be careful sorting your hashtable ... Sort-Object may change it to an array:

PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Hashtable                                System.Object


PS> $hash = $hash.GetEnumerator() | Sort-Object Name
PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Object[]                                 System.Array
share|improve this answer
3  
like this one more for readability, especially for not dedicate powershell developers like me. – anIBMer Aug 20 '14 at 13:32
1  
I agree this method is easier to read and therfore probably better for scripting. – leinad13 Sep 9 '14 at 10:12
1  
Readability aside, there is one difference between VertigoRay's solution and Andy's solution. %{} is an alias for ForEach-Object, which is different than the foreach statement here. ForEach-Object makes use of the pipeline, which can be much faster if you're already working with a pipeline. The foreach statement does not; it's a simple loop. – JamesQMurphy Jan 3 '15 at 3:12
    
@JamesQMurphy I don't see anything that supports your claim of the pipeline being faster, based on my tests: gist.github.com/VertigoRay/3bb0166d6a877839b420 – VertigoRay Aug 18 '15 at 5:47
    
@VertigoRay In your test, you are piping $hash.Keys, which is essentially just an IEnumerable, so your results are going to be nearly similar to the pure enumeration case. The pipeline can be much faster, but you will only see that behavior where the pipeline contains results from items running in parallel (like from jobs, or from other servers via Invoke-Command). – JamesQMurphy Aug 18 '15 at 17:13

About loop through an hash:

$Q = @{"ONE"="1";"TWO"="2";"THREE"="3"}
$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.VALUE }
1
3
2

$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.key }
ONE
THREE
TWO
share|improve this answer

You can also do this without a variable

@{
  'foo' = 222
  'bar' = 333
  'baz' = 444
  'qux' = 555
} | % getEnumerator | % {
  $_.key
  $_.value
}
share|improve this answer
    
This gets me a " ForEach-Object : Cannot bind parameter 'Process'. Cannot convert the "getEnumerator" value of type "System.String" to type "System.Management.Automation.ScriptBlock" – luis.espinal Jan 27 at 16:46

If you're using PowerShell v3, you can use JSON instead of a hashtable, and convert it to an object with Convert-FromJson:

@'
[
    {
        FileName = "Page";
        ObjectName = "vExtractPage";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItemCategory";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItem";
    },
]
'@ | 
    Convert-FromJson |
    ForEach-Object {
        $InputFullTableName = '{0}{1}' -f $TargetDatabase,$_.ObjectName

        # In strict mode, you can't reference a property that doesn't exist, 
        #so check if it has an explicit filename firest.
        $outputFileName = $_.ObjectName
        if( $_ | Get-Member FileName )
        {
            $outputFileName = $_.FileName
        }
        $OutputFullFileName = Join-Path $OutputDirectory $outputFileName

        bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
    }
share|improve this answer
    
n.b. the command is ConvertFrom-Json (and the converse, ConvertTo-Json) -- just swap the dash placement. – andrew Oct 20 '15 at 20:14

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