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I've got this - possibly trivial - loop/combinations problem similar to binary combinations. I don't know how to approach it efficiently. Consider this scenario, I need unique loop to pass through all these combinations in a sequence:

Round  ABC

01.    000 <- values of A=0, B=0, C=0
02.    001
03.    010
04.    011
05.    100
06.    101
07.    110
08.    111

09.    002
10.    012
11.    102
12.    112
13.    020
14.    021
15.    120
16.    121 <- values of A=1, B=2, C=1
17.    022
18.    122
19.    220
20.    221
21.    222

Except there are 12 letters (A-L), and also the "bit" size is not just 0,1 or 2 but any integer number (from 0 possibly up-to 1000 or 1024, not to make it crazy). I know it's a huge load of combinations, but I'll just scrap just top few that also fulfill my other conditions. So no need to worry about computational madness.

Disclaimer: The order has to be exactly as shown above. NOT a multiple FOR loops going first 0-1024 for C, then B.

Thanks in advance, I just can't seem to find the way to "algorithm it".

Update: Added whole sequence for combinations of ABC/012

regards, Kate

Explanation:

I've encountered this problem when trying to tackle problem of analyzing sum of money for its combination of coins/notes:

For example $5001 to find out x optimal combinations.

10x $500 + 1x $1
50x $100 + 1x $1
..

Now letters (A,B,C..) correspond to a number of possible values of banknotes or coins ($1, $5,.. $100). While base correspond to a number of pieces of that banknotes/coins (for example $5001/$5000 = 1piece max.)

share|improve this question
    
Interesting sequence - why does the second set (values 9 through 16) never have a "2" in the first position? –  Bevan Jan 26 '12 at 9:00
    
It does, it continues: 022, 122, 220, 221, 222,.. –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 9:01
3  
You'll probably want to explain the sequence, I find it unlikely that anyone would be able to determine the exact sequence with what you've given so far. –  Nabb Jan 26 '12 at 9:02
3  
I guess as soon as you are able to express what kind of sequence you need in plain English, you will also have the algorithm you are looking for.+ –  Kit Fisto Jan 26 '12 at 9:07
2  
It's a challenge of its own to even understand exact rules for sequence progression. Almost like an IQ test. –  Groo Jan 26 '12 at 9:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

if I guess your sequence right, you will have it easier to generate it recursively

here an approach in Java, which should generate a sequence that matches your scenario. I hope it helps you (maybe I add more explanation later):

public static void init() {
    // define constants
    final int length = 3;
    final char maxValue = '3';

    // define buffer
    final char[] array = new char[length]; java.util.Arrays.fill(array, '0');
    final boolean[] alreadySet = new boolean[length]; java.util.Arrays.fill(alreadySet, false);

    // fill first digit, then let the recursion take place
    for(char c = '1'; c <= (char)(maxValue); c++) {
        // iterate from lowest to highest digit
        for(int i = array.length-1; i >= 0; i--) {
            // set value
            array[i] = c;
            alreadySet[i] = true;
            // print value
            System.out.println(new String(array));
            // call recursion
            recursive(array, c, i, alreadySet, length);
            // unset value
            alreadySet[i] = false;
            array[i] = '0';
        }
    }
}

public static void recursive(char[] array, char lastValue, int lastIndex, boolean[] alreadySet, int leftToSet) {
    // if we didn't set all digits
    if(leftToSet > 0) {
        // iterate from lowest to highest digit
        for(int i = array.length-1; i >= 0; i--) {
            // missing all digits already set
            if(!alreadySet[i]) {
                // count from 1 to lastValue-1
                for(char c = '1'; c < lastValue; c++) {
                    // set value
                    array[i] = c;
                    alreadySet[i] = true;
                    // print value
                    System.out.println(new String(array));
                    // call recursion
                    recursive(array, c, i, alreadySet, leftToSet-1);
                    // unset value
                    alreadySet[i] = false;
                    array[i] = '0';
                }
            }
        }

        char c = lastValue;
        // iterate from lowest to highest digit
        for(int i = array.length-1; i > lastIndex; i--) {
            // missing all digits already set
            if(!alreadySet[i]) {
                // set value
                array[i] = c;
                alreadySet[i] = true;
                // print value
                System.out.println(new String(array));
                // call recursion
                recursive(array, c, i, alreadySet, leftToSet-1);
                // unset value
                alreadySet[i] = false;
                array[i] = '0';
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to implement it, but I have troubles with "missing all digits already set"? What it means exactly? –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 11:37
    
if you set the 3 in 0030, then you iterate from 003* to 0*30 to 030 ; then if you are on 003 and set it 2 => 0032 you iterate from 0*32 to *032 ; hope this makes it more clear –  Hachi Jan 26 '12 at 11:45
    
Frankly, I'm not able to grasp it. And I read it like thousand times. Can you please try to expand on the pseudo-code a bit? –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 12:37
    
oh i see, there's gone sth wrong with the format; I'll expand it later for you –  Hachi Jan 26 '12 at 13:04
    
Indeed that does it. I ran it for 12 letters and up to about '4' values, and it seems consistent. Thanks a lot. Wow! –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 14:53

A rough sketch in pseudo C#/Java:

Mapping A-L to indexes 0-11

const int[] maxvalues = { define max values for each var }
int[] counters = { initialize with 0s }

while (true)
{
  for(i in 11..0)
  {
    counters[i]++;
    if (counters[i] < maxvalues[i])
      break;   // for
    counters[i] = 0;
  }

  if (counters[0] == maxvalues[0])
    break;     // while

  print(counters.ToDisplayString());
}

(Just noted that the second sequence does not match the first sequence in OP. If OP is correct, I guess I didn't "get" the sequence)

share|improve this answer
    
if(counters[0] = maxvalues[0]) should be if(counters[0] == maxvalues[0]) –  Amichai Jan 26 '12 at 9:32
    
Hi, thanks, I cannot determine by eye whether it does what it should. Give me a moment to try it. :) –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 9:43
    
@SmartK8: it cannot match, because there exists no formal way to describe that sequence. –  Groo Jan 26 '12 at 9:53
    
This gives me equivalent of having for cycle per letter. So if maximal value for C is 1000 it goes 0-1000 first, the increments B by 1, and C goes 0-1000 again. Not good. –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 10:07

The sequence of numbers you've described can be enumerated by counting upward from 0 in a base representation of numbers one higher than the amount of "letters" used to create your individual sequences.

One simple way to do this is to use a radix converter from base 10 which will act on a variable being incremented in a single loop from 0 to the maximum number of combinations you are looking to achieve.

Here is an implementation:

void Main()
{
    for(int i=0; i< 50; i++){
     Console.Write(convert(5,i));
     Console.Write("\n");
    }
}

string convert(int N, int M){
    Stack<int> stack = new Stack<int>();

    while (M >= N){
     stack.Push(M %N);
     M = M / N;
    }
    string str = M.ToString();
    while(stack.Count() > 0)
      str = str + stack.Pop().ToString();
    return str;
}

Starting output:

0 1 2 3 4 10 11 12 13 14 20 21 22 23 24 30 31 32 33 34 40 41 42 43 44 100 101 102 103 104

share|improve this answer
    
How can I then decode how many pieces (number) of what letter? –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 10:51
    
This doesn't produce OP's sequence. Note that her sequence changes direction between 12th and 15th element (if observed as a base-n number). –  Groo Jan 26 '12 at 11:17
    
@Groo, The OP's sequence (which isn't fully explained) seems to be a trivial variation on the sequence I provide. –  Amichai Jan 26 '12 at 11:48
    
I just don't know how to decode for example 13 back to A=1 (1 piece), B=2 (2 pieces), C=1 (1 piece)? Can you elaborate on that? –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 11:55
    
(A=1, B=2, C=1 was an example) –  SmartK8 Jan 26 '12 at 12:23

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