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Here is my scenario on SQL Server 2008 R2:

This is my first table:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Foos](
    [FooId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Foos] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
  (
    [FooId] ASC
  )
) ON [PRIMARY]

This is the second table which has a relationship to Foos table:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Bars](
    [BarId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [FooId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Bars] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
  (
    [BarId] ASC
  )
) ON [PRIMARY]

Go

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Bars]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_Bars_Foos] FOREIGN KEY([FooId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Foos] ([FooId])
ON DELETE CASCADE
GO

But it is not one to one. What should I do to force this to be one to one relationship? Should I use check constraints?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add a unique constraint to FooId in Bars.

However, you don't need BarID then because they have the same key. So it looks like this

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Bars] (
    [FooId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK_Bars] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (FooId),

    CONSTRAINT [FK_Bars_Foos] FOREIGN KEY([FooId]) 
           REFERENCES [dbo].[Foos] ([FooId])
           ON DELETE CASCADE
)
GO

However again, you don't need Bars at all: it is one table...

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That makes a lot of sense. One thing in my mind is if there is really a one to one relationship term or not. Let's say I am using an ORM tool and read the schema of the DB. would that ORM tool sees this a one to one rel? I know it depends on the tool but is there a common sense? –  tugberk Jan 26 '12 at 9:14
    
@tugberk: I have seen Hibernate create extra tables that are unnecessary. Common sense is to define the model/design in the database independently of what the ORM says. But that's my opinion as a database guy :) –  gbn Jan 26 '12 at 9:32

You can keep Identity column(BarID) also. Then Unique key will help you out from this problem.

   IF NOT EXISTS(SELECT OBJECT_ID from sys.objects WHERE name ='foo_bars')
alter table bars add constraint foo_bars unique(fooid)
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