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This one doesn't want to compile:

class MainClass
{
public:
    ...

private:
    class NestedClass
    { //Line 39
        ...
    };

    class NestedClass * getNestedClassFor(int i);
};

The compiler says:

error: 'class MainClass::NestedClass' is private

However, if I made NestedClass public, it would work.

Why doesn't it work? It's not as though I'm exporting a nested class through a public method? It's just a private method returning a pointer to a private class. Any ideas?

Thanks!

Update

Fixed the semi-columns. They're not the problem. Neither is writing class in front of NestedClass.

Here's the error message:

MainClass.h: In function 'MainClass::NestedClass* getNestedClassFor(int i)':

MainClass.h:39: error: 'class MainClass::NestedClass' is private

MainClass.cpp:49: error: within this context

Here's the part of the .cpp file that's also complaining:

class MainClass::NestedClass * getNestedClassFor(int i) //Line 49
{
    return NULL;
}
share|improve this question
1  
On what line do you get the error? Are there more errors that might be related? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 26 '12 at 9:18
2  
You're missing semicolons after the class definitions. –  FredOverflow Jan 26 '12 at 9:20
    
Is this the actual code? There are two missing semi-colons. –  hmjd Jan 26 '12 at 9:21
    
Why do you put class infront of getNestedClassFor? –  ezdazuzena Jan 26 '12 at 9:22
    
It should work if you put the definition of getNestedClassFor in the header. Is your problem with the declaration or the definition? –  irobot Jan 26 '12 at 9:37

5 Answers 5

This compiles and works fine:

class A {
private:
    class B {
    public:
        B() {};
    };

    B *b;   
    B *getB();

public:
    A();
};

A::A()
{
    b = getB();
}

A::B* A::getB()
{
    A::B *tmp = new A::B();
    return tmp;
}

int main()
{
    A a;
    return 0;
}
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Had forgotten to add the class scope in the .cpp, i.e.

class MainClass::NestedClass * getNestedClassFor(int i)
{
   //...
}

Should be

class MainClass::NestedClass * MainClass::getNestedClassFor(int i)
{
   //...
}

Stupid me!

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one error is: (In fact it is not a error, just a stylish, see comments bellow)

class NestedClass * getNestedClassFor(int i);

should be only:

 NestedClass * getNestedClassFor(int i);

Another is: when you declare a nested class, you should finish the declaration with a ";"

private:
  class NestedClass
  {
      ...
  };

May be there has another errors there...

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1  
codepad.org/o9kDmFEe this compiles so it must be about what you say –  Hayri Uğur Koltuk Jan 26 '12 at 9:24
    
The first (redundant class) is not an error, but merely C style. –  MSalters Jan 26 '12 at 9:48
    
The first "error" isn't one---it's not very C++ish, but using class or struct here is legal C++. (For reasons of C compatibility: C requires struct here, and since class and struct are basically the same thing...) The missing semicolon is an error, although the error message is really weird for it. –  James Kanze Jan 26 '12 at 9:52
    
Thanks @JamesKanze and MSalters :-) –  Pih Jan 26 '12 at 9:58

Why would you want to do it? You shouldn't expose private stuff to outside clients. That's the whole point of encapsulation. Make it public if it's needed to be accessible from outside.

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Or make it opaque (like a HANDLE). –  ereOn Jan 26 '12 at 10:11
    
It's about hiding an implementation stuff. Sometimes you need some data structures to calculate something and you don't want to expose this API so that you can change the implementation later without changing the API. –  Szymon Wygnański Jan 14 at 8:34

Why doesn't it work? It's not as though I'm exporting a nested class through a public method? It's just a private method returning a pointer to a private class. Any ideas?

The compiler message is very clear. You're returning a pointer to a private nested class. The called of this function would then need to know the structure of this class, however since the class is private, then getting the structure is prohibited. You should private some of the class' attributes and methods, not the class itself. Even so, if you make all attributes and methods private then this class would have no use case.

What are you trying to achieve anyway?

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1  
But the function is private. Why not pass a private inner object to another private function? –  Kit Fisto Jan 26 '12 at 9:24

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