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I don't really know if the title is correct, but the question is quite simple:

I have a value and a key.

The key is as follows:

"one.two.three"

Now, how can I set this hash:

params['one']['two']['three'] = value

share|improve this question
    
This is definitely a duplicate; look hard on the site and you'll find more answers. – Phrogz Jan 26 '12 at 11:59
3  
Your comment would be useful if it included a link. – Misha Moroshko Jan 27 '12 at 2:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try to do it with this code:

keys = "one.two.three".split '.' # => ["one", "two", "three"]
params = {}; value = 1; i = 0;  # i is an index of processed keys array element
keys.reduce(params) { |hash, key|
    hash[key] = if (i += 1) == keys.length
      value # assign value to the last key in keys array
    else
      hash[key] || {} # initialize hash if it is not initialized yet (won't loose already initialized hashes)
    end
}
puts params # {"one"=>{"two"=>{"three"=>1}}}
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Looks good, was hoping for a one liner, but this will work.. Thanks! – Tim Baas Jan 26 '12 at 9:57
1  
@Tim. No need for one-liners, just create an abstraction Hash#set_from_path(path, value) written with good, clear, maintenable code. – tokland Jan 26 '12 at 14:45

You can use the inject method:

key = "one.two.three"
value = 5

arr = key.split(".").reverse
arr[1..-1].inject({arr[0] => value}){ |memo, i| {i => memo} }
# => {"one"=>{"two"=>{"three"=>5}}}
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So can I make this a one liner like so: hash = key.split(".").reverse[1..-1].inject({arr[0] => value}){ |memo, i| {i => memo}} ? – Tim Baas Jan 26 '12 at 12:06
    
+Tim, arr is not defined in your one liner – DNNX Jan 26 '12 at 15:56
1  
"one.two.three".split('.').reverse.inject(5) { |x, y| { y => x } } outputs => {"one"=>{"two"=>{"three"=>5}}} – DNNX Jan 26 '12 at 15:58
    
That looks very nice, but how can I do it on an existing hash ? – Tim Baas Jan 26 '12 at 16:33

Use recursion:

def make_hash(keys)
  keys.empty? ? 1 : { keys.shift => make_hash(keys) }
end

puts make_hash("one.two.three".split '.')
# => {"one"=>{"two"=>{"three"=>1}}}
share|improve this answer
    
this is ok to create a new hash, but I thought the OP wanted to update an existing hash... – tokland Jan 26 '12 at 14:47

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