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What would be an F# idiomatic way of writing the following ? Or would you leave this as is ?

let input = 5
let result = 
     if input > 0 && input  < 5 then
         let a = CalculateA(input)
         let b = CalculateB(input)
         (a+b)/2
     else
         CalculateC(input)
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7  
I see nothing wrong with it (although I have programmed just in OCaml, not F#) –  fortran Jan 26 '12 at 9:36
2  
Absolutely nothing "unidiomatic" here. –  kkm Jan 26 '12 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

For one if ... then ... else ... I'd probably leave it like that, if you had more cases I'd either use pattern match with a when guard:

let result =
    match input with
    | _ when input > 0 && input < 5  -> ...
    | _ -> ...

or you might also want to look at active patterns: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd233248.aspx

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What would be an F# idiomatic way of writing the following ? Or would you leave this as is ?

There's nothing wrong with the way you've written it but here is another alternative (inspired by Huusom):

let input = 5
let result =
  if input>0 && input<5 then [A; B] else [C]
  |> Seq.averageBy (fun f -> f input)
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Creating a sequence to average two values may seem a bit of an overkill, doesn't it? Would this actually create a .NET IEnumerable under the hood or would the compiler optimise this away? –  Alexander Rautenberg Feb 22 '12 at 18:44
    
@AlexanderRautenberg: This may well be overkill and it will certainly be a lot slower. I just wanted to provide a more elegant solution following Huusom's point that the original code did look like it might be dealing with longer sequences. –  Jon Harrop Feb 23 '12 at 9:20
    
getting it now, didn't have the proper context. Within context, your solution looks clearly much more reasonable. :-) –  Alexander Rautenberg Feb 23 '12 at 22:01

This is minor stylistic change but I find this more readable:

let input = 5
let result = 
     if input > 0 && input < 5 then
         (calculateA input + calculateB input) / 2
     else
         calculateC input
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This is not really an answer because Robert is correct. But it looks like you are working with series of functions, so you could write it like this:

let Calculate input =
    let calc = function | [f] -> f input | fl -> fl |> List.map ((|>) input) |> List.sum |> (fun s -> s / fl.Length)
    if input > 0 && input < 5
        then calc [CalculateA; CalculateB]
        else calc [CalculateC]

You could decompose to something with this signature: ((int -> int) list) -> ((int -> int) list) -> (int -> bool) -> int -> int and then build your function by applying the first 3 parameters.

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3  
-1: WTF?! That's hideous. –  Jon Harrop Jan 27 '12 at 12:36
    
Well, yes it is :) But the original question looks like "if input satifies this, then calculate the average of these functions, otherwise just calculate this function". And, I just found List.averageBy - damn. –  Huusom Jan 27 '12 at 13:12
    
I appreciate the sentiment but why not (if input>0 && input<5 then [A; B] else [C]) |> Seq.averageBy (fun f -> f input) rather than an unnecessary special case and a transsiberian pipeline of superfluous combinators. :-) –  Jon Harrop Jan 27 '12 at 15:03
    
Because I, stupidly, did not check the List or Seq modules first, I am so sorry... :) –  Huusom Jan 27 '12 at 17:01

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