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Currently I'm reading a collection of items from a stream. I do this as following:

public class Parser{

 private TextReader _reader; //Get set in Constructor
 private IEnumerable<Item> _items;    

 public IEnumerable<Item> Items{
  get{
   //I >>thought<< this would prevent LoadItems() from being called twice.
   return _items ?? (_items = LoadItems());
  }
 }

 public IEnumerable<Item> LoadItems(){
  while(_reader.Peek() >= 0){
   yield return new Item(_reader.ReadLine()); //Actually it's a little different
  }
 }
}

Let say I have a stream which contains two items, and I do the following:

var textReader = //Load textreader here
var parser = new Parser(textReader);
var result1 = parser.Items.Count();
var result2 = parser.Items.Count();

Now result1 is 2, while result2 is one.

Now I noticed, that my null check is useless? It seems that everytime I call that function it gets yielded anyway.

Can someone explain to me why this is? And what would be the best solution for this situation (please tell me if what I'm doing is complete crap :P).

share|improve this question
    
yup, it should yield every time since you are not assigning '_items' variable anywhere so its always null and load items is called every time. –  Furqan Jan 26 '12 at 10:56
    
Please correct me if I'm wrong but ain't I assigning it here _items = LoadItems() –  Timo Willemsen Jan 26 '12 at 10:57
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because LoadItems is a lazy enumerable (uses yield) and you are assigning it to a field, it means that every time you enumerate _items you are actually causing the loop within LoadItems() to be run again, i.e. (Enumerable.Count creates a new Enumerator each time which cause the LoadItems body to be run again). As you are not creating the reader afresh each time within LoadItems its cursor will be positioned at the end of the stream so will likely not be able to read any more lines — I suspect that it is returning null and your your single Item object returned on the second call contains a null string.

Solutions to this would be to 'realise' the result of LoadItems by calling Enumerable.ToList which will give you a concrete list:

return _items ?? (_items = LoadItems().ToList());

Or seeking the reader back to the beginning of the stream (if possible) such that LoadItems can run again each time identically.

But I would recommend you simply get rid of the yielding in this case and return a concrete list as there is little benefit so you are paying the complexity price for no gain.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I figured. But when you're exhaustively reading a resource and yield-returning the items. How can you make sure you don't lose the resources. –  Timo Willemsen Jan 26 '12 at 10:58
    
You can preserve the result of the reader by realising the read lines into a concrete list, either by calling Enumerable.ToList on the resultant IEnumerable or by constructing a List<> (or other data structure) manually, e.g. LoadItems().ToList() or new List<Item>(LoadItems()). –  Paul Ruane Jan 26 '12 at 11:03
    
Aah thanks! I totally got the idea of the yield wrong! Thanks for explaining it :) –  Timo Willemsen Jan 26 '12 at 11:03
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Your variable name has led you astray. At the moment:

 private IEnumerable<Item> _items; 

you are lazy-loading and saving the iterator, whereas you probably want to be lazy-loading and saving the items (as the variable name suggests):

public class Parser{

 private TextReader _reader; //Get set in Constructor
 private List<Item> _items;    

 public IEnumerable<Item> Items{
  get{
   return _items ?? (_items = LoadItems().ToList());
  }
 }

 private IEnumerable<Item> LoadItems(){
  while(_reader.Peek() >= 0){
   yield return new Item(_reader.ReadLine()); //Actually it's a little different
  }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Consider that yield is used as short hand. Your code gets turned into something like:

private class <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide : IEnumerator<Item>
{
   private TextReader _rdr;
   /* other state-holding fields */
   public <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide(TextReader rdr)
   {
     _rdr = rdr;
   }
   /* Implement MoveNext, Current here */
}
private class <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide2 : IEnumerable<Item>
{
   private TextReader _rdr;
   /* other state-holding fields */
   public <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide2(TextReader rdr)
   {
     _rdr = rdr;
   }
   public <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide GetEnumerator()
   {
     return new <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide(_rdr);
   }
   /* etc */
}
public IEnumerable<Item> LoadItems()
{
    return new <>ImpossibleNameSoItWontCollide2(_rdr);
}

Hence LoadItems() is indeed only called once, but the object it returns has GetEnumerator() called on it twice.

And since the TextReader has moved on, this gives the wrong results for you. Though do note that it leads to a lower use of memory than holding onto all the items, so it's got benefits when you don't want to use the same set of items twice.

Since you do want to, you need to create an object that stores them:

return _items = _items ?? _items = LoadItems().ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Ah awesome, I really like this answer because you explained what the syntactic sugar of yield actually does! –  Timo Willemsen Jan 26 '12 at 11:28
    
You're welcome. It's worth adding, that if you'd put a using block into LoadItems to dispose the TextReader when you were finished, then the Dispose() method of the enumerator would dispose it (but not the enumeration, so if the enumeration wasn't actually enumerated through, then it wouldn't be called). –  Jon Hanna Jan 26 '12 at 12:08
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