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I need to check the checked property of a checkbox and perform an action based on the checked property using jQuery.

For example, if the age checkbox is checked, then I need to show a textbox to enter age, else hide the textbox.

But the following code returns false by default:

if($('#isAgeSelected').attr('checked')) {
    $("#txtAge").show();
} else {
    $("#txtAge").hide();
}

How do I successfully query the checked property?

share|improve this question
    
Check some other ways to do this using jQuery here stackoverflow.com/a/22019103/1868660 – Subodh Ghulaxe Feb 25 '14 at 15:45
    
$('#isAgeSelected').change(function(){ alert($('#chkSelect').attr('checked')); }); – Khaled.K May 14 '14 at 5:43
    
related stackoverflow.com/questions/4086957/… – Adrien Be May 21 '14 at 15:18
1  
$('#isAgeSelected') returns collection, replace it with: $('#isAgeSelected')[0].checked – zamoldar May 19 '15 at 16:53
3  
why not $('#isAgeSelected').checked – mmcrae Oct 27 '15 at 14:52

54 Answers 54

How do I successfully query the checked property?

The checked property of a checkbox DOM element will give you the checked state of the element.

Given your existing code, you could therefore do this:

if(document.getElementById('isAgeSelected').checked) {
    $("#txtAge").show();
} else {
    $("#txtAge").hide();
}

However, there's a much prettier way to do this, using toggle:

$('#isAgeSelected').click(function() {
    $("#txtAge").toggle(this.checked);
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<input type="checkbox" id="isAgeSelected"/>
<div id="txtAge" style="display:none">Age is something</div>

share|improve this answer
14  
i have tried the above condition too, but it returns false only – Prasad May 23 '09 at 15:24
13  
$("#txtAge").toggle(this.checked); Does exactly the same as $("#txtAge").toggle(). So, if for some reason the state is checked and the next div is hidden (you clicked back button in your browser) - it won't work as expected. – Maksim Vi. Oct 4 '10 at 20:55
32  
The top answer here is much cleaner and intuitive than all this is(':checked') business. :) – Chiramisu Mar 5 '12 at 19:11
13  
@Chiramisu - If you had read the answer all the way down, you would have noticed that my edit does not use the is(':checked') business. – karim79 Mar 6 '12 at 10:14
2  
to set: $("#chkmyElement")[0].checked = true; to get: if($("#chkmyElement")[0].checked) – JJ_Coder4Hire Apr 22 '14 at 2:28

Use jQuery's is() function:

if($("#isAgeSelected").is(':checked'))
    $("#txtAge").show();  // checked
else
    $("#txtAge").hide();  // unchecked
share|improve this answer
4  
If you don't need duration, easing etc., you can use $("#txtAge").toggle($("#isAgeSelected").is(':checked')) – naor Sep 11 '13 at 7:21
4  
+1 there are different ways to get checked property. Some are listed here – user3199690 Oct 30 '14 at 7:07
    
@NickG Actually jQuery does have a :visible selector – hvdd Jul 17 '15 at 21:37
1  
@hvdd I know - I said "property", not selector. – NickG Jul 20 '15 at 8:16
    
@NickG ...I don't understand what you mean. jQuery has no .visible "property" (property? you mean method?) because the no HTML element has a visible property. They have a display style property and it's a bit more complex than on/off. – xDaizu Jan 28 at 11:43

Using jQuery > 1.6

<input type="checkbox" value="1" name="checkMeOut" id="checkMeOut" checked="checked" />

// traditional attr
$('#checkMeOut').attr('checked'); // "checked"
// new property method
$('#checkMeOut').prop('checked'); // true

Using the new property method:

if($('#checkMeOut').prop('checked')) {
    // something when checked
} else {
    // something else when not
}
share|improve this answer
15  
I would like to know why this is Not the answer ... if you are using jquery at all, then the .prop method is the designed way to check props. .. ... If you are going to do the .is(":checked") approach, that's fine, but it is not the designed way to do it using jquery. right? – dsdsdsdsd Dec 1 '13 at 12:28
    
@dsdsdsdsd presumably because it needs yet another backwards compatibility step (I'm facing the same issue right now). – user98085 Jan 28 '14 at 11:38
6  
.is(":checked") and .prop("checked") are both valid ways to get the same result in jQuery, .is will work in all versions, .prop requires 1.6+ – gnarf Jun 26 '14 at 20:50
    
If you use .attr('checked') in jQuery 1.11.3, you get undefined, where if you use .prop('checked'), you'll get true/false. I do not see why they changed it to work this way when older browsers cannot support the later jQuery versions that introduced .prop() and therefore need .attr(). The only saving grace is that the older browsers (i.e. IE 8) cannot support anything > jQuery 1.9. Hopefully they did not do this (make .attr('checked') = undefined) in that version! Fortunately, there is always this.checked. – vapcguy Jun 19 '15 at 16:53

I am using this and this is working absolutely fine:

$("#checkkBoxId").attr("checked") ? alert("Checked") : alert("Unchecked");

Note: If the checkbox is checked it will return true otherwise undefined, so better check for the "TRUE" value.

share|improve this answer
63  
The ==true operation is unnecessary, if does this anyway. – peterjwest Jan 14 '11 at 10:23
4  
This works because $("#checkkBoxId").attr("checked") returns "checked" or "" (empty string). And an empty string is falsy, non-empty string is truthy, see about truthy/falsy values docs.nodejitsu.com/articles/javascript-conventions/… – Adrien Be Jul 12 '13 at 7:09
4  
By jquery 2.1.x it returns always checked if it is checked by default... I don't know whether this behavior is intentional, but it surely does not work ( I guess it is a bug )... The val() does not work either, it stays "on". The prop() is working properly and the dom.checked works either. – inf3rno Jul 23 '14 at 16:19
4  
Ah, I see in later JQuery versions, "attr" now has to be "prop" instead. Goodbye, that half-hour of my life. – Dronz Feb 9 '15 at 18:35
1  
And the problem comes when you have to support older browsers with .attr()! If only they just left well enough alone.... Found another answer on here said you can just use this.checked for a cross-jQuery solution, since it is just basically Javascript. – vapcguy Jun 19 '15 at 16:48

Since jQuery 1.6, The behavior of jQuery.attr() has changed and users are encouraged not to use it to retrieve an element's checked state. Instead, you should use jQuery.prop():

$("#txtAge").toggle(
    $("#isAgeSelected").prop("checked") // for checked attribute it returns true/false;
                                        // return value changes with checkbox state
);                           

Two other possibilities are:

$("#txtAge").get(0).checked
$("#txtAge").is(":checked")
share|improve this answer
2  
for some reason, prop("checked") worked for me, but not is(':checked') – BraveNewMath Jun 11 '12 at 20:19

jQuery 1.6+

$('#isAgeSelected').prop('checked')

jQuery 1.5 and below

$('#isAgeSelected').attr('checked')

Any version of jQuery

// Assuming an event handler on a checkbox
if (this.checked)

all credit to: Xian

share|improve this answer
    
Technically, this.checked is using straight Javascript. But I love that cross-jQuery-version answer! – vapcguy Jun 19 '15 at 16:50

If you are using an updated version of jquery, you must go for .prop method to resolve your issue:

$('#isAgeSelected').prop('checked') will return true if checked and false if unchecked. I confirmed it and I came across this issue earlier. $('#isAgeSelected').attr('checked') and $('#isAgeSelected').is('checked') is returning undefined which is not a worthy answer for the situation. So do as given below.

if($('#isAgeSelected').prop('checked')) {
    $("#txtAge").show();
} else {
    $("#txtAge").hide();
}

Hope it helps :)- Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
why not $('#isAgeSelected').checked ? – mmcrae Oct 27 '15 at 14:53
    
to use .is you need a colon $('#isAgeSelected').is(':checked') – Patrick Feb 18 at 12:44
up vote 43 down vote accepted

This worked for me:

$get("isAgeSelected ").checked == true

Where isAgeSelected is the id of the control.

Also, @karim79's answer works fine. I am not sure what I missed at the time I tested it.

Note, this is answer uses Microsoft Ajax, not jQuery

share|improve this answer

I decided to post an answer on how to do that exact same thing without jQuery. Just because I'm a rebel.

var ageCheckbox = document.getElementById('isAgeSelected');
var ageInput = document.getElementById('txtAge');

// Just because of IE <333
ageCheckbox.onchange = function() {
    // Check if the checkbox is checked, and show/hide the text field.
    ageInput.hidden = this.checked ? false : true;
};

First you get both elements by their ID. Then you assign the checkboxe's onchange event a function that checks whether the checkbox got checked and sets the hidden property of the age text field appropriately. In that example using the ternary operator.

Here is a fiddle for you to test it.

Addendum

If cross-browser compatibility is an issue then I propose to set the CSS display property to none and inline.

elem.style.display = this.checked ? 'inline' : 'none';

Slower but cross-browser compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, .hidden is not very cross-browser, although I like this solution :) – Florian Margaine Mar 20 '12 at 19:59
    
It is indeed the best way to use style. That is unfortunate though, as .hidden performance is way better. – Florian Margaine Mar 21 '12 at 9:37
    
Assignment inside a conditional operator? Legal, yes. Not what I'd call good style, however. – Jules Apr 5 '12 at 12:12
    
can simplify to: ageInput.hidden = ! this.checked; (I hate when people use boolean literals unnecessarily... if you are using both "true" and "false" in the same simple statement, it's probably unnecessary to use either) – JoelFan Mar 6 '15 at 20:38

Using the Click event handler for the checkbox property is unreliable, as the checked property can change during the execution of the event handler itself! Ideally, you'd want to put your code into a change event handler such as it is fired every time the value of the check box is changed(independent of how it's done so).

$('#isAgeSelected').bind('change', function () {

   if ($(this).is(':checked'))
     $("#txtAge").show();
   else
     $("#txtAge").hide();

});
share|improve this answer
3  
As of jQuery 1.7, the .on() method is the preferred method for attaching event handlers to a document. – naor Sep 11 '13 at 7:02

I believe you could do this:

if ($('#isAgeSelected :checked').size() > 0)
{
    $("#txtAge").show(); 
} else { 
    $("#txtAge").hide();
}
share|improve this answer
    
alert($('input[name=isAgeSelected]').attr('checked')); The above code shows true/false based on the check. Any problem with the previous tries – Prasad May 23 '09 at 15:41
    
Prasad, are you referencing your checkbox by name or ID? I'm getting confused now... – karim79 May 23 '09 at 15:52
    
i have referenced it by name – Prasad May 23 '09 at 16:08
    
Can you not give it an ID? Things would be a lot easier, In your example you have address it by it's ID – xenon May 23 '09 at 16:10
$(selector).attr('checked') !== undefined

This returns true if the input is checked and false if it is not.

share|improve this answer
4  
I understand why this might work in certain scenarios, although it has the same issue as .attr('checked') in that it doesn't always return the correct state. As per Salman A's answer (and perhaps others'), it's a safer option to make use of .prop('checked') instead. Besides, it's also possible to declare undefined as var undefined = 'checked';. – WynandB Apr 5 '13 at 0:56
    
.prop('checked') does seem a better answer now. It wasn't as reliable at the time it was written. I do not understand, nor do think it is a good idead to redeclare undefined. – fe_lix_ Apr 25 '13 at 10:02
    
As a side note, checking for undefined is better with typeof (x) !== "undefined" – naor Sep 11 '13 at 7:05
    
In that case, I believe it is more accurate and easier to read with !==. I would use the typeof(x) only when testing a variable that may or may not have been defined in the past. – fe_lix_ Sep 18 '13 at 8:04

I ran in to the exact same issue. I have an ASP.NET checkbox

<asp:CheckBox ID="chkBox1" CssClass='cssChkBox1' runat="server" />

In the jQuery code I used the following selector to check if the checkbox was checked or not, and it seems to work like a charm.

if ($("'.cssChkBox1 input[type=checkbox]'").is(':checked'))
{ ... } else { ... }

I'm sure you can also use the ID instead of the CssClass,

if ($("'#cssChkBox1 input[type=checkbox]'").is(':checked'))
{ ... } else { ... }

I hope this helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
Bingo. Question asker's comments identify that this is the correct solution to his problem (even if not the correct solution according to the question he originally asked): he is using an HTML form generator that is not correctly associating control IDs with the controls themselves (but, presumably, with an element that contains both the control and associated elements, e.g. labels). – Jules Apr 5 '12 at 12:18

My way of doing this is:

if ( $("#checkbox:checked").length ) {       
    alert("checkbox is checked");
} else {
    alert("checkbox is not checked");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why this was downvoted. A valid, albeit unusual way to check for a checkbox being checked. – Jules Apr 5 '12 at 12:15
    
Simple and good approach of checking checkbox in JavaScript, I have tested it in my application, it works, thank you very much – Joe_Tz Feb 26 at 1:09
$(document).ready(function() {    
    $('#agecheckbox').click(function() {
        if($(this).is(":checked"))
        {
            $('#agetextbox').show();
        } else {
            $('#agetextbox').hide();
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Toggle: 0/1 or else

<input type="checkbox" id="nolunch" />
<input id="checklunch />"

    $('#nolunch').change(function () {
    if ($(this).is(':checked')) {
        $('#checklunch').val('1');
    };
    if ($(this).is(':checked') == false) {
        $('#checklunch').val('0');
    };
});
share|improve this answer

Top answer didn't do it for me, this did though:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){

    $("#li_13").click(function(){
        if($("#agree").attr('checked')){
            $("#saveForm").fadeIn();
        }

        else
        {
            $("#saveForm").fadeOut();
        }
    });
    });

</script>

UPDATE 20121213: Basically when the element #li_13 is clicked, it checks if the element #agree (which is the checkbox) is checked by using the .attr('checked') function, if it is then fadeIn the #saveForm element, and if not fadeOut the saveForm element.

share|improve this answer
if($("#checkkBoxId").is(':checked')){
  alert("Checked=true");
}

or

if($("#checkkBoxId").attr('checked') == true){
  alert("checked=true");
}
share|improve this answer

this works for me,

/* isAgeSelected being id for checkbox */

$("#isAgeSelected").click(function(){
  $(this).is(':checked') ? $("#txtAge").show() : $("#txtAge").hide();
});
share|improve this answer

I verified in Firefox 9.0.1 that the following works for catching the state of a checkbox post change:

$("#mycheckbox").change(function() {
    var value = $(this).prop("checked") ? 'true' : 'false';                     
    alert(value);
});
share|improve this answer

1) If your HTML markup is:

<input type="checkbox"  />

attr used:

$(element).attr("checked");//will give you undefined as initial value of checkbox is not set

If prop is used :

$(element).prop("checked");//will give you false whether or not initial value is set 

2) If your HTML markup is:

 <input type="checkbox"  checked="checked" />// may be like this also  checked="true"

attr used:

$(element).attr("checked")//will return checked whether it is checked="true"

prop used:

$(element).prop("checked")//will return true whether checked="checked" 
share|improve this answer
    
This is a REAL problem. My workaround - add a change event to the input: <input type="checkbox" onchange="ChangeChkBox()" /> then use that event to change a boolean JavaScript variable, and use the JavaScript variable instead of querying the checkbox directly. – Graham Laight May 10 at 11:33

I think it will be the simple one

$('#isAgeSelected').change(function() {
    if($(this).is(":checked")) {
        $('#txtAge').show();
    }
else{
        $('#txtAge').hide();
    }                                          
});
share|improve this answer

I was having the same problem and none of the posted solutions seemed to work and then I found out that it's because ASP.NET renders the CheckBox control as a SPAN with INPUT inside, so the CheckBox ID is actually an ID of a SPAN, not an INPUT, so you should use:

$('#isAgeSelected input')

rather than

$('#isAgeSelected')

and then all methods listed above should work.

share|improve this answer

Here's an example that includes initialising the show/hide to match the state of the checkbox when the page loads; taking account of the fact that firefox remembers the state of checkboxes when you refresh the page, but won't remember the state of the shown/hidden elements.

$(function() {
    // initialise visibility when page is loaded
    $('tr.invoiceItemRow').toggle($('#showInvoiceItems').attr('checked'));
    // attach click handler to checkbox
    $('#showInvoiceItems').click(function(){ $('tr.invoiceItemRow').toggle(this.checked);})
});

(with help from other answers on this question)

share|improve this answer

Though you have proposed a javascript solution for your problem (Displaying a textbox when a checkbox is checked), this problem could be solved just by css. With this approach, your form works for users who have disabled javascript.

Assuming that you have the following html:

<label for="show_textbox">Show Textbox</label>
<input id="show_textbox" type="checkbox" />
<input type="text" />

You can use the following css to achieve the desired functionality:

 #show_textbox:not(:checked) + input[type=text] {display:none;}

For other scenarios, you may think of appropriate css selectors.

Here is a Fiddle to demonstrate this approach.

share|improve this answer

I am using this :

 <input type="checkbox" id="isAgeSelected" value="1" /> <br />
 <input type="textbox" id="txtAge" />

 $("#isAgeSelected").is(':checked') ? $("#txtAge").show() : $("#txtAge").hide(); 
share|improve this answer

Im sure its not some revalation but didnt see it all in one example: Selector for all checked checkboxes(on the page):

$('input[type=checkbox]:checked')
share|improve this answer

Setter:

$("#chkmyElement")[0].checked = true;

Getter:

if($("#chkmyElement")[0].checked) {
   alert("enabled");
} else {
   alert("disabled");
}
share|improve this answer

There Are many way to check checkbox is checked or not :

Way to check using jQuery

if ( elem.checked )
if ( $( elem ).prop( "checked" ) )
if ( $( elem ).is( ":checked" ) )
if ( $( elem ).attr( 'checked' ) )

check example Or also document

http://api.jquery.com/attr/

http://api.jquery.com/prop/

share|improve this answer

You can use:

  if(document.getElementById('isAgeSelected').checked)
    $("#txtAge").show();  
  else
    $("#txtAge").hide();

if($("#isAgeSelected").is(':checked'))
  $("#txtAge").show();  
else
  $("#txtAge").hide();

Both of them will work.

share|improve this answer

protected by Mr. Alien May 21 '13 at 16:47

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