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hi there i was wondering if someone could help with this:

i have a series of equations that result in 5 numbers (a, b, c, d, e). I would like to normalize these numbers to a scale from 0 to 1

Problem is I dont know the numbers beforehand so i dont know the max and min value. In other words the max and min numbers are different each time the user enters different values to the equations.

I know that i could use

y = 1 + (x-A)*(10-1)/(B-A)

where y is the normalized value for x. A is the min value and B is the max value.

one of the numbers (a, b, c, d, e) can be the max value and another can be min value.

So basically i need to compare these numbers, find which one is the max and which one is the min and add them to the aforementioned formula for normalization.

Any ideas???

ps this is iphone sdk

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You've already described what you need to do. So what is the problem? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 26 '12 at 11:01
    
i dont know how to do it in xcode... (compare the a, b, c, d, e numbers to see which is max and min every time) –  George Asda Jan 26 '12 at 11:02
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

make an array and compare it.

NSArray *array = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:[NSNumber numberWithInt:a], [NSNumber numberWithInt:b],[NSNumber numberWithInt:c],[NSNumber numberWithInt:d], nil];
int max = [[array valueForKeyPath:@"@max.intValue"] intValue];
int min = [[array valueForKeyPath:@"@min.intValue"] intValue];

hope this help you.

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i will try this! thanks!!! didnt know that i could call "max.intValue" –  George Asda Jan 26 '12 at 11:18
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float min = a;
float max = a;

if (b < min)
  min = b;
if (b > max)
  max = b;

And repeat the last 4 lines for c, d, and e

Note: Of course, the proper way to do it would be to reiterate using a C array rather than just repeating the lines, but this will get you started.

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