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I had to extend my existing code with a Class B. The existing code uses a singleton in Library. Now Class B (which itself will be available as a singleton as is Class A) needs its own library instance...

I'm wondering what's the best way to extend the existing code (Class A, Library) such that I have to change the library as less as possible.

public class A 
{
    var lib = Library.Instance;

    public DoSomething()
    {
        lib.DoStuff();
    }    
}

public class B
{
    var lib = Library.Instance;  //wrong! needs its own instance

    public DoSomething()
    {
        lib.DoOtherStuff();
    }    
}

public class Library
{
    public static Library Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return _librarySingleton;
        }
    }

    //library internally uses singleton too!!
}

public static class MyProgram
{
    var a = new A();    //will be an singleton
    var b = new B();    //will be an singleton

    a.DoSomething();
    b.DoSomething();
}

There will never be another class. So two instances will be just fine.

share|improve this question
3  
This is why the singleton pattern is much abhorred: it makes the application the context. "There will never be another class" — surely the original author had this thought too... –  Paul Ruane Jan 26 '12 at 11:46
    
Then you don't need a singleton as by definition there is only one instance. Can you not create two instances of the Library class? –  Dr. ABT Jan 26 '12 at 11:46
    
You say library internally uses singleton too. When you have two instances, its not any more a singleton. Which of the two instances will library use internally then? –  Jan Jan 26 '12 at 11:48
2  
If you need two different singleton instance, I'm sure that somewhere something went terribly wrong. Before you create any workaround for this, think twice why you need separate instances –  Novakov Jan 26 '12 at 11:48
    
if you need two instances dont use singleton. –  blindmeis Jan 26 '12 at 11:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unfortunately the Singleton pattern really can't help you here as this pattern is specifically designed to return one and only one instance for the lifetime of the application.

Singletons are useful for certain cases like Logging, however they are generally avoided as they are notoriously difficult to mock out, test and extend.

If possible, I would recommend refactoring the above code to use the Inversion of Control Pattern and constructor injection of the dependency. This is achieved by creating an interface, say ILibrary and having two implementations.

These implementations can be created once and stored to emulate Singleton-like behaviour in a third helper class. A really good way of doing this is in an enterprise application is to utilise a Dependency Injection Container, which maintains the lifetime of instances (Singleton or Transient) and allows easy injection into constructors.

A code example using IoC/DI as a pattern would look like this:

public class A 
{
    private readonly ILibrary _library;

    public A(ILibrary library)
    {
        _library = library;
    }

    public DoSomething()
    {
        _library.DoStuff();
    }    
}

public class B
{
    private readonly ILibrary _library;

    public B(ILibrary library)
    {
        _library = library;
    }

    public DoSomething()
    {
        _library.DoStuff();
    }      
}

public interface ILibrary
{
    void DoStuff();
}

public class LibraryTypeOne : ILibrary
{
    void DoStuff()
    {
         Console.WriteLine("I am library type one");
    }
}

public class LibraryTypeTwo : ILibrary
{
    void DoStuff()
    {
         Console.WriteLine("I am library type two");
    }
}

public static class MyProgram
{
    var a = new A(new LibraryTypeOne());    // Note, you need to store
    var b = new B(new LibraryTypeTwo());    // these instances somewhere to 
                                            // share throughout the app

    a.DoSomething();
    b.DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be a very interesting approach. I have just one library though (so LibraryTypeOne would be sufficient). Anyway, because my real code is more complicated I used to work with the singleton even in the library itself (in classes which are used in the library). Now I would have to pass myself (Library) to those classes, right? –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 12:23
    
@user520094 yes but you have two implementations of DoStuff right? So creating two classes/instances actually helps separate the implementations. Another benefit of this approach is if you write unit tests you can create a public class StubLibrary : ILibrary and pass in to instances A and B. StubLibrary can be made to return canned values for your tests. I'd be wary of overusing Singleton as you can often end up with spaghetti code - impossible to test, debug, extend and also not thread safe! –  Dr. ABT Jan 26 '12 at 12:32
    
OK, I agree. It's just that it was handy to use a singleton in my library-intern-classes. I could just use Library.Instance.SomeMethod() in my classes... Now I have to pass ILibrary along all classes... –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 12:39
    
@user520094 yes you will I'm afraid. Perhaps its somethign to bear in mind in the future then - either for new projects or for a refactor of this one. When you do Dependency Injection containers can do the wire up for you. –  Dr. ABT Jan 26 '12 at 12:41

If your design will always be limited to 2 instances, you could provide a property Library.SecondInstance.

Anyway, you might want to take a look at the Multiton pattern as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple ang genial! –  Oybek Jan 26 '12 at 11:48
1  
But how about the library? Because it uses the singleton itself I doesn't know whether it operates on FirstInstance or SecondInstance... –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 11:48
    
@user520094: Yes, thats exactly the problem and the reason that when you have two instances, you don't work with the singleton pattern anymore... –  Jan Jan 26 '12 at 11:49
    
@Jan: I thought so. That's the reason of this post... I'm looking for another pattern I could easily switch to. –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 11:52
    
Of course the SecondInstance property would need to return another (separate) instance that must be maintained inside the Library class. –  Andrea Jan 26 '12 at 11:52

DI container comes in very handy in these cases. Both A and B have a dependency on Libraray instance. Instead of creating that instance in those two classes, inject the dependency in to them. DI containers like Autofac maintain the single instance life time for you thus allowing you to inject these dependencies freely.

share|improve this answer
 public class Library
    {
        public Library()
        { }
        private static Library _secondInstance = new Library();
        private static Library _librarySingleton = new Library();
        public Library Second()
        {
            return _secondInstance;
        }
        public static Library Instance
        {
            get
            {
                return _librarySingleton;
            }
        }
        //library internally uses singleton too!!
    }

usage

 Library obj1 = Library.Instance;
 Library obj2= Library.Instance.Second();

Looks a bit readable to me

share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work because the library itself doesn't know on which instance it's supposed to operate. –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 12:08
    
I cannot think of the problem you are mentioning. Can you give a scenario where the library need to know the instance it is supposed to operate? –  Jimmy Jan 26 '12 at 12:13
    
So far for example I have code in the library like Library.Instance.DoACalculation(). –  Dunken Jan 26 '12 at 12:18
    
I presume Library.Instance.DoACalculation() is inside a static function as you are not using "this". If so, this change to two intances per class can potentially break everything. –  Jimmy Jan 26 '12 at 12:37

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