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I am currently working on a web application, where I want the content to fill the height of the entire screen.

The page has a header, which contains a logo, and account information. This could be an arbitrary height. I want the content div to fill the rest of the page to the bottom.

I have a header div and a content div. At the moment I am using a table for the layout like so:

CSS and HTML

#page {
    height: 100%; width: 100%
}

#tdcontent {
    height: 100%;
}

#content {
    overflow: auto; /* or overflow: hidden; */
}
<table id="page">
    <tr>
        <td id="tdheader">
            <div id="header">...</div>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td id="tdcontent">
            <div id="content">...</div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

The entire height of the page is filled, and no scrolling is required.

For anything inside the content div, setting top: 0; will put it right underneath the header. Sometimes the content will be a real table, with it's height set to 100%. Putting header inside content will not allow this to work.

Is there a way to achieve the same effect without using the table?

Update:

Elements inside the content div will have heights set to percentages as well. So something at 100% inside the div will fill it to the bottom. As will two elements at 50%.

Update 2:

For instance, if the header takes up 20% of the screen's height, a table specified at 50% inside #content would take up 40% of the screen space. So far, wrapping the entire thing in a table is the only thing that works.

share|improve this question
125  
This is EXACTLY why we shouldn't hassle people who use table based layouts. – JohnFx Jan 25 '12 at 3:16
10  
For anyone stumbling here in the future, you can get the desired table layout in most browsers, without the table mark-up, by using display:table and related properties, see this answer to a very similar question. – AmeliaBR Jan 20 '14 at 2:23
1  
I've tried to recereate your setup - jsfiddle.net/ceELs - but its not working, what am I missed? – Gill Bates Apr 14 '14 at 12:12
2  
@Mr. Alien's answer is simple and useful, check it out http://stackoverflow.com/a/23323175/188784 – Gohan Jun 20 '14 at 3:30
1  
Actually, what you describe does not work, even with tables: if the content takes more vertical space than the screen height, the table cell and the whole table will expand beyond the screen bottom. Your content's overflow:auto will not make a scrollbar appear. – Damien Jul 1 '14 at 20:00

27 Answers 27

up vote 223 down vote accepted

2015 update: the flexbox approach

There are two other answers briefly mentioning flexbox; however, that was more than two years ago, and they don't provide any examples. The specification for flexbox has definitely settled now.

Note: Though CSS Flexible Boxes Layout specification is at the Candidate Recommendation stage, not all browsers have implemented it. WebKit implementation must be prefixed with -webkit-; Internet Explorer implements an old version of the spec, prefixed with -ms-; Opera 12.10 implements the latest version of the spec, unprefixed. See the compatibility table on each property for an up-to-date compatibility status.

(taken from https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/CSS/Flexible_boxes)

All major browsers and IE11+ support Flexbox. For IE 10 or older, you can use the FlexieJS shim.

To check current support you can also see here: http://caniuse.com/#feat=flexbox

Working example

With flexbox you can easily switch between any of your rows or columns either having fixed dimensions, content-sized dimensions or remaining-space dimensions. In my example I have set the header to snap to its content (as per the OPs question), I've added a footer to show how to add a fixed-height region and then set the content area to fill up the remaining space.

html,
body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0
}

.box {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column;
  height: 100%;
}

.box .row {
  border: 1px dotted grey;
}

.box .row.header {
  flex: 0 1 auto;
}

.box .row.content {
  flex: 1 1 auto;
}

.box .row.footer {
  flex: 0 1 40px;
}
<!-- Obviously, you could use HTML5 tags like `header`, `footer` and `section` -->

<div class="box">
  <div class="row header">
    <p><b>header</b>
      <br />
      <br />(sized to content)</p>
  </div>
  <div class="row content">
    <p>
      <b>content</b>
      (fills remaining space)
    </p>
  </div>
  <div class="row footer">
    <p><b>footer</b> (fixed height)</p>
  </div>
</div>

In the CSS above, the flex property shorthands the flex-grow, flex-shrink, and flex-basis properties to establish the flexibility of the flex items. Mozilla has a good introduction to the flexible boxes model.

share|improve this answer
5  
Why the flex: 0 1 30px; attribute in box .row as it's override in every div? – Erdal G. Nov 15 '15 at 9:36
2  
Here's the browser support for flexbox - nice to see all that green - caniuse.com/#feat=flexbox – bburns.km May 10 at 18:40
1  
Link to Flexie.js is dead. Here the github project github.com/doctyper/flexie – ses3ion Jun 10 at 10:49
    
@bburns.km I've updated the post with caniuse, nice link! – Pebbl Jun 24 at 8:43
    
@ses3ion I've updated the flexie link, thanks for the pointer! – Pebbl Jun 24 at 8:45

There really isn't a sound, cross-browser way to do this in CSS. Assuming your layout has complexities, you need to use JavaScript to set the element's height. The essence of what you need to do is:

Element Height = Viewport height - element.offset.top - desired bottom margin

Once you can get this value and set the element's height, you need to attach event handlers to both the window onload and onresize so that you can fire your resize function.

Also, assuming your content could be larger than the viewport, you will need to set overflow-y to scroll.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's what I suspected. However, the app will also work with Javascript turned off, so I guess I'll just keep using the table. – Vincent McNabb Sep 18 '08 at 9:22
43  
Because non of the solutions work as per the description. – Vincent McNabb Sep 29 '08 at 22:08
6  
Vincent, way to stand your ground. I was looking to do the exact same thing and it appears not possible with css? I'm not sure but regardless none of the other tons of solutions do what you've described. The javascript one is the only one that works correctly at this point. – Travis May 4 '10 at 20:00
13  
+1 for forcing me do deal with reality. It has taken years for me to finally accept that there is no CSS for this exact problem. X-( – Dan Ross Mar 7 '13 at 21:50
4  
what if window height changes – Techsin Nov 17 '13 at 8:55

The original post is more than 3 years ago. And I guess many people who come to this post like me are looking for an app-like layout solution, say a somehow fixed header, footer, and full height content taking up the rest screen. If so, this post may help, it works on IE7+, etc.

http://blog.stevensanderson.com/2011/10/05/full-height-app-layouts-a-css-trick-to-make-it-easier/

And here are some snippets from that post,

@media screen { 
  
  /* start of screen rules. */ 
  
  /* Generic pane rules */
  body { margin: 0 }
  .row, .col { overflow: hidden; position: absolute; }
  .row { left: 0; right: 0; }
  .col { top: 0; bottom: 0; }
  .scroll-x { overflow-x: auto; }
  .scroll-y { overflow-y: auto; }

  .header.row { height: 75px; top: 0; }
  .body.row { top: 75px; bottom: 50px; }
  .footer.row { height: 50px; bottom: 0; }
  
  /* end of screen rules. */ 
}
<div class="header row">
    <h2>My header</h2>
</div> 
<div class="body row scroll-y">
    <p>The body</p>
</div> 
<div class="footer row">
    My footer
</div>

share|improve this answer
54  
There’s just one problem with this: the header and footer aren’t auto-sized. That is the real difficulty, and that is why a "this is not possible" answer is currently at the top... – romkyns Mar 4 '12 at 17:16
5  
Even if it's not a solution to the original problem, this helped me—so thank you anyway:) – Luke Sampson Sep 6 '12 at 10:46
    
I needed a 55px header and a div that fills the rest of the document's height. this is the solution! – Matías Sep 11 '12 at 0:46
    
You are the bomb, I've been trying this for so long and this is the only solution I found. I needed my nav element to be 60px height at the top and the remainder to span 100%, this solved it. – Adam Waite Jan 7 '13 at 10:07
1  
.col is not used, is it? – slartidan Nov 2 '15 at 12:34

Instead of using tables in the markup, you could use CSS tables.

Markup

<body>    
    <div>hello </div>
    <div>there</div>
</body>

(Relevant) CSS

body
{
    display:table;
    width:100%;
}
div
{
    display:table-row;
}
div+ div
{
    height:100%;  
}

FIDDLE1 and FIDDLE2

Some advantages of this method are:

1) Less markup

2) Markup is more semantic than tables, because this is not tabular data.

3) Browser support is very good: IE8+, All modern browsers and mobile devices (caniuse)


Just for completeness, here are the equivalent Html elements to css properties for the The CSS table model

table    { display: table }
tr       { display: table-row }
thead    { display: table-header-group }
tbody    { display: table-row-group }
tfoot    { display: table-footer-group }
col      { display: table-column }
colgroup { display: table-column-group }
td, th   { display: table-cell }
caption  { display: table-caption } 
share|improve this answer
3  
i was just pointed to the technique of css tables. Turns out the answer already was already in this answered question. This is the best solution; clean, elegant, and using the exact tool in the exact way it was intended. CSS Tables – Ian Boyd Aug 10 '13 at 22:27
    
The fiddle code doesn't quite match the answer here. Adding html, body { height: 100%, width: 100% } seemed critical in my tests. – mlibby Nov 23 '13 at 16:14
7  
An annoying features of CSS tables is exactly the same as with normal tables: If the content is too large they expand the cell to fit. This means you may still need to limit the size (max-height), or set the height from code if the page is dynamic. I really miss Silverlight grids! :( – Gone Coding Feb 24 '14 at 17:32
1  
You can always add an absolutely positioned container inside the tabel row element then set its width and height to 100%. Remember to set the position to relative on the table-row element as well. – Mike Mellor May 13 at 16:40

CSS only Approach (If height is known/fixed)

When you want the middle element to span across entire page vertically, you can use calc() which is introduced in CSS3.

Assuming we have a fixed height header and footer elements and we want the section tag to take entire available vertical height...

Demo

Assumed markup

<header>100px</header>
<section>Expand me for remaining space</section>
<footer>150px</footer>

So your CSS should be

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}

header {
    height: 100px;
    background: grey;
}

section {
    height: calc(100% - (100px + 150px)); 
    /* Adding 100px of header and 150px of footer */

    background: tomato;
}

footer {
    height: 150px;
    background-color: blue;
}

So here, what am doing is, adding up the height of elements and than deducting from 100% using calc() function.

Just make sure that you use height: 100%; for the parent elements.

share|improve this answer
7  
The OP said that the header could be an arbitrary height. So if you don't know the height in advance you won't be able to use calc :( – Danield Apr 28 '14 at 8:20
    
@Danield That's why I've mentioned fixed height :) – Mr. Alien Apr 28 '14 at 10:52
    
This is the solution that worked for me and did not require me to redesign my existing pages around flexboxes. If you are using LESS, i.e. Bootstrap, be sure and read the coderwall post on how to escape the calc() function so LESS doesn't handle it. – jlyonsmith Aug 1 '15 at 0:48
    
This is work for me! – New-Learner May 12 at 12:16

I've been searching for an answer for this as well. If you are fortunate enough to be able to target IE8 and up, you can use display:table and related values to get the rendering rules of tables with block-level elements including div.

If you are even luckier and your users are using top-tier browsers (for example, if this is an intranet app on computers you control, like my latest project is), you can use the new Flexible Box Layout in CSS3!

share|improve this answer
5  
@ArtemOboturov According to the W3C, HTML5 is a far way off from being finished, but I see big sites like Youtube using a fair share of what's already here. – Camilo Martin Aug 26 '12 at 23:36

What worked for me (with a div within another div and I assume in all other circumstances) is to set the bottom padding to 100%. That is, add this to your css / stylesheet:

padding-bottom: 100%;
share|improve this answer
2  
Perfect answer, thanks – Adam Casey Jan 6 '13 at 4:02
8  
100% of what? If I try this I get a huge blank space and scrolling starts to happen. – mlibby Nov 23 '13 at 15:44
    
100% of the viewport size maybe @mlibby. If you set your html and body to 100% height also, then the div can go 100%. With only a single div, the 100% will be relative to the div content. I didn't try it with a nested div. – Jess Sep 18 '14 at 1:44
1  
It means 100% of the element's height (added as the element's padding), which makes it double the height. No assurance it will fill the page, and definitely not the answer to the question. It may as already notet actually fill more than the viewport. – Martin Jul 1 '15 at 10:43
    
padding-bottom: 100% sets height +100% of parent container width – Romeno Jun 1 at 17:24

It could be done purely by CSS using vh:

#page 
{
  display:block; width:100%; height:95vh !important; overflow:hidden;
}
#tdcontent 
{
  float:left; width:100%; display:block;
}
#content 
{      
float:left; width:100%; height:100%; display:block; overflow:scroll;
}

and the HTML

<div id="page">
   <div id="tdcontent">
   </div>
   <div id="content">
   </div>
</div>

I checked it, It works in all major browsers: Chrome, IE, and FireFox

share|improve this answer
2  
Wow, never heard of vh and vw units before. More info: snook.ca/archives/html_and_css/vm-vh-units – Steve Bennett Apr 1 '15 at 11:30
1  
Ahh, every day is learning, Thanks for VH and Vw @ormoz – ShekharPankaj Oct 19 '15 at 12:08
    
Unfortunately, this does not support IE8 :( – Scott Jan 6 at 21:01
    
I tried this approach, but the height: 100% on #content caused its height to match that of #page, ignoring #tdcontent's height altogether. With a lot of content, the scroll bar extends beyond the bottom of the page. – Brandon Mintern Jul 8 at 13:44

None of the solutions posted work when you need the bottom div to scroll when the content is too tall. Here's a solution that works in that case:

HTML:

<div class="table container">
  <div class="table-row header">
    <div>This is the header whose height is unknown</div>
    <div>This is the header whose height is unknown</div>
    <div>This is the header whose height is unknown</div>
  </div>
  <div class="table-row body">
    <div class="table-cell body-content-outer-wrapper">
      <div class="body-content-inner-wrapper">
        <div class="body-content">
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
          <div>This is the scrollable content whose height is unknown</div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.table {
  display: table;
}
.table-row {
  display: table-row;
}
.table-cell {
  display: table-cell;
}
.container {
  width: 400px;
  height: 300px;
}
.header {
  background: cyan;
}
.body {
  background: yellow;
  height: 100%;
}
.body-content-outer-wrapper {
  height: 100%;
}
.body-content-inner-wrapper {
  height: 100%;
  position: relative;
  overflow: auto;
}
.body-content {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}

Original source: Filling the Remaining Height of a Container While Handling Overflow in CSS

JSFiddle live preview

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!!! I tried all of the non-table, non-flexbox answers, and this is the only one that worked 100% correctly. One question: the original source only has a body-content-wrapper, and things seem to work just fine without the double wrapper (without any table-cells). Is there a problem with doing it that way? – Brandon Mintern Jul 8 at 14:26
1  
@BrandonMintern If you don't have the table-cells, it doesn't work in IE8 and IE9. (See comment in original article.) – John Kurlak Jul 9 at 21:50
    
Yep, the cells are also required in IE10. Unfortunately, in IE10 and under, the .body height ends up being the same height as that set on .container. The vertical scrollbar is still in the right place, but the .container ends up getting stretched bigger than we want. When it is full screen, the bottom of .body is off the bottom of the screen. – Brandon Mintern Jul 11 at 22:16
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
body
,html
{
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    color: #FFF;
}

#header
{
    float: left;
    width: 100%;
    background: red;
}

#content
{
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
    background: blue;
}

</style>
</head>
<body>

    <div id="content">
	    <div id="header">
			    Header
    			<p>Header stuff</p>
	    </div>
		    Content
    		<p>Content stuff</p>
    </div>

</body>
</html>

In all sane browsers, you can put the "header" div before the content, as a sibling, and the same CSS will work. However, IE7- does not interpret the height correctly if the float is 100% in that case, so the header needs to be IN the content, as above. The overflow: auto will cause double scroll bars on IE (which always has the viewport scrollbar visible, but disabled), but without it, the content will clip if it overflows.

share|improve this answer
    
Close! Almost what I want, except I'm going to have other things positioned in the div... i.e. top: 0; will put something right below the header. I'll modify my question again, because you answered it perfectly, and still not what I want! I'll just hide the overflow as the content must fit. – Vincent McNabb Sep 18 '08 at 7:50
    
-1: This answer creates a div called content that covers the whole screen, not the rest of the screen – Casebash May 19 '11 at 5:44

I wresteled with this for a while and ended up with the following:

Since it is easy to make the content DIV the same height as the parent but apparently difficult to make it the parent height minus the header height I decided to make content div full height but position it absolutely in the top left corner and then define a padding for the top which has the height of the header. This way the content displays neatly under the header and fills the whole remaining space:

body {
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    height: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
}

#header {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    height: 50px;
}

#content {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    padding-top: 50px;
    height: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
11  
What if you don't know the height of the header ? – Yugal Jindle Mar 17 '13 at 7:46

CSS3 Way

height: calc(100% - 10px); // 10px is height of your first div...
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the best answer for IE9+. – Jason Tu Oct 2 '15 at 18:25

If you can deal with not supporting old browsers (that is, MSIE 9 or older), you can do this with Flexible Box Layout Module which is already W3C CR. That module allows other nice tricks, too, such as re-ordering content.

Unfortunately, MSIE 9 or lesser do not support this and you have to use vendor prefix for the CSS property for every browser other than Firefox. Hopefully other vendors drop the prefix soon, too.

An another choice would be CSS Grid Layout but that has even less support from stable versions of browsers. In practice, only MSIE 10 supports this.

share|improve this answer

Why not just like this?

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}

#containerInput {
    background-image: url('../img/edit_bg.jpg');
    height: 40%;
}

#containerControl {
    background-image: url('../img/control_bg.jpg');
    height: 60%;
}

Giving you html and body (in that order) a height and then just give your elements a height?

Works for me

share|improve this answer
    
I like this one. thanks! – JeyKeu Nov 2 '12 at 10:10
    
The thing is if a user uses a large screen to review this page and your header's height is fixed exactly 100px which is smaller than 40% of current height, there will be a big blank gap between your header and body context. – Neeson.Z May 14 '15 at 8:13

A simple solution, using flexbox:

<div>header</div>
<div class="content"></div>

html, body {
  height: 100%;
}

body {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

.content {
  flex-grow: 1;
}

Codepen sample

An alternate solution, with a div centered within the content div

share|improve this answer

I found a quite simple solution, because for me it was just a design issue. I wanted the rest of the Page not to be white below the red footer. So i set the pages background color to red. And the contents backgroundcolor to white. With the contents height set to eg. 20em or 50% an almost empty page won't leave the whole page red.

share|improve this answer

You can actually use display: table to split the area into two elements (header and content), where the header can vary in height and the content fills the remaining space. This works with the whole page, as well as when the area is simply the content of another element positioned with position set to relative, absolute or fixed. It will work as long as the parent element has a non-zero height.

See this fiddle and also the code below:

CSS:

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

p {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

.additional-padding {
    height: 50px;
    background-color: #DE9;
}

.as-table {
    display: table;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}

.as-table-row {
    display: table-row;
    height: 100%;
}

#content {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: #33DD44;
}

HTML:

<div class="as-table">
    <div id="header">
        <p>This header can vary in height, it also doesn't have to be displayed as table-row. It will simply take the necessary space and the rest below will be taken by the second div which is displayed as table-row. Now adding some copy to artificially expand the header.</p>
        <div class="additional-padding"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="as-table-row">
        <div id="content">
            <p>This is the actual content that takes the rest of the available space.</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
2  
A good answer, which I upvoted, but unfortunately, does not work with IE8, which will still be around for a long time to come. – Vincent McNabb Jul 9 '13 at 6:24
    
Yes, I figured that out myself so I also couldn't use it in my application, but at least I could share the solution in hope that maybe someone may know something I don't know and improve it. And, well, maybe it's that time again to think about serving different content to IE rather than degrading the experience on all browsers for all users just to accommodate for IE? Thanks for upvoting :) – Amiramix Jul 9 '13 at 13:06
    
Applications like Gmail use Javascript for the sizing, which is a better solution that CSS in most cases anyway. – Vincent McNabb Jul 9 '13 at 21:31
    
I think they are using Javascript because there is no other good cross-browser CSS solution, not because it's better. – Amiramix Jul 9 '13 at 21:37

Try this

var sizeFooter = function(){
    $(".webfooter")
        .css("padding-bottom", "0px")
        .css("padding-bottom", $(window).height() - $("body").height())
}
$(window).resize(sizeFooter);
share|improve this answer

Vincent, I'll answer again using your new requirements. Since you don't care about the content being hidden if it's too long, you don't need to float the header. Just put overflow hidden on the html and body tags, and set #content height to 100%. The content will always be longer than the viewport by the height of the header, but it'll be hidden and won't cause scrollbars.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"     "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
  <head>
    <title>Test</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    body, html {
      height: 100%;
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
      overflow: hidden;
      color: #FFF;
    }
    p {
      margin: 0;
    }

    #header {
      background: red;
    }

    #content {
      position: relative;
      height: 100%;
      background: blue;
    }

    #content #positioned {
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
      right: 0;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <div id="header">
    Header
    <p>Header stuff</p>
  </div>

  <div id="content">
    Content
    <p>Content stuff</p>
    <div id="positioned">Positioned Content</div>
  </div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Already thought of this. But it doesn't work either. I'm just going to stick with a table because it works. Thanks for the update though. – Vincent McNabb Sep 18 '08 at 18:02

There's a ton of answers now, but I found using height: 100vh; to work on the div element that needs to fill up the entire vertical space available.

In this way, I do not need to play around with display or positioning. This came in handy when using Bootstrap to make a dashboard wherein I had a sidebar and a main. I wanted the main to stretch and fill the entire vertical space so that I could apply a background colour.

div {
    height: 100vh;
}

Supports IE9 and up: click to see the link

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I came up with an idea for this. For approximately 92% of the people viewing my website (lakipolitis.com), their browser is 1680x1050 or smaller. I've set my height for #main to a minimum height, then defined the height of the footer.

body {
    height: 100%;
}

#main {
    min-height: 89%;
}

#footer {
    height: 63px;
    overflow: hidden;
}

So effectively, #main will always take up as much as 89% (never less than my content, and usually never less than ~940px) of the viewable space, which will ALWAYS be smaller than my content.

It may not work for you, but it worked for me.

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Used: height: calc(100vh - 110px);

code:

  
.header { height: 60px; top: 0; background-color: green}
.body {
    height: calc(100vh - 110px); /*50+60*/
    background-color: gray;
}
.footer { height: 50px; bottom: 0; }
  
<div class="header">
    <h2>My header</h2>
</div> 
<div class="body">
    <p>The body</p>
</div> 
<div class="footer">
    My footer
</div>

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Disclaimer: The accepted answer gives the idea of the solution, but I'm finding it a bit bloated with an unnecessary wrapper and css rules. Below is a solution with very few css rules.

HTML 5

<body>
    <header>Header with an arbitrary height</header>
    <main>
        This container will grow so as to take the remaining height
    </main>
</body>

CSS

body {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  min-height: 100vh;       /* body takes whole viewport's height */
}

main {
  flex: 1;                 /* this will make the container take the free space */
}

Solution above uses viewport units and flexbox, and is therefore IE10+, providing you use the old syntax for IE10.

Codepen to play with: link to codepen

Or this one, for those needing the main container to be scrollable in case of overflowing content: link to codepen

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Spining off the idea of Mr. Alien....

This seems a leaner solution than the popular flex box one for CSS3 enabled browsers.

Simply use min-height(instead of height) with calc() to the content block.

The calc() starts with 100% and subtracts heights of headers and footers (need to include padding values)

Using "min-height" instead of "height" is particularly useful so it can work with javascript rendered content and JS frameworks like Angular2. Otherwise the calculation will not push the footer to the bottom of the page once the javascript rendered content is visible.

Here is a simple example with a header and footer using 50px height and 20px padding for both.

Html:

<body>
    <header></header>
    <div class="content"></div>
    <footer></footer>
</body>

Css:

.content {
    min-height: calc(100% - (50px + 20px + 20px + 50px + 20px + 20px));
}

Of course the math can be simplified but you get the idea...

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It can be done via Jquery very easliy:

function footerbottom() {
    var footer = $('#footer');
    var getfootheight = footer.height();
    var getbodyheight = $('body').height();
    var decutthetwo = getbodyheight - getfootheight;
    footer.css({
        position: 'absolute',
        top: decutthetwo
    });
}

footerbottom();

Fiddle

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1  
This looks like the answer to a totally different question. He asked how to set the height of the div, not how to absolutely position the div a certain distance from the bottom of the page. Interesting way to make a footer though, if that's what you want to do. – pilavdzice Aug 8 '14 at 18:58

it never worked for me in other way then with use of the JavaScript as NICCAI suggested in the very first answer. I am using that approach to rescale the <div> with the Google Maps.

Here is the full example how to do that (works in Safari/FireFox/IE/iPhone/Andorid (works with rotation)):

CSS

body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

.header {
  height: 100px;
  background-color: red;
}

.content {
  height: 100%;
  background-color: green;
}

JS

function resize() {
  // Get elements and necessary element heights
  var contentDiv = document.getElementById("contentId");
  var headerDiv = document.getElementById("headerId");
  var headerHeight = headerDiv.offsetHeight;

  // Get view height
  var viewportHeight = document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].clientHeight;

  // Compute the content height - we want to fill the whole remaining area
  // in browser window
  contentDiv.style.height = viewportHeight - headerHeight;
}

window.onload = resize;
window.onresize = resize;

HTML

<body>
  <div class="header" id="headerId">Hello</div>
  <div class="content" id="contentId"></div>
</body>
share|improve this answer

If the only issue is height, just using divs seems to work:

<div id="header">header content</div>
<div id="content" style="height:100%">content content</div>

In a simple test, the width of header/content is different in your example and mine, but I'm not sure from your post if you're concerned about the width?

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1  
That's not quite what I want to do. I want the content div to fill the remainder of the screeen, not to actually be the same height as the screen. – Vincent McNabb Sep 18 '08 at 5:33
    
That appears to be what my example does, at least when I try it. Do you not see that behavior? – Bruce Sep 20 '08 at 2:46
3  
Try putting a table inside the content, that is at size 100%. It will not work. – Vincent McNabb Sep 29 '08 at 22:08
    

protected by Mr. Alien Apr 27 '14 at 11:55

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