Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to fix an issue, in my application I have this code

try {
  object1.method1();
} catch(Exception ex) {
   JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(nulll, "Error: "+ex.getMessage());
}

and the object1 would do something like that:

public void method1() {
   //some code...
   throw new RuntimeException("Cannot move file");
}

I get a messsage in my option pane like this: Error: java.lang.RuntimeException: Cannot move file

but I used getMessage and not toString method, so the name of the class shouldn´t appear, right?

What I am doing wrong? I already tryied with a lot of exceptions, even Exception itself. I'm looking to solve this no without the need to implement my own Exception subclass

PROBLEM SOLVED - thank you all!

The try and catch were actually being called in get() method from SwingWorker which constructs an ExecutionException with my exception thrown from doInBackground() I fixed doing this:

@Override
protected void done() {
    try {
        Object u = (Object) get();
        //do whatever u want
    } catch(ExecutionException ex) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Error: "+ex.getCause().getMessage());
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Error: "+ex.getMessage());
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Sounds odd - can you reproduce this in a short but complete program? –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '12 at 12:01
    
Can you add e.printStackTrace() as well in catch? It looks like @dacwe is right. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 26 '12 at 12:04
    
Looking at the stack trace I can see that the problem might be the Swing Worker.......the try { } is actually calling get() from swing worker method done() and the exception is thrown in doInBackGround –  fredcrs Jan 26 '12 at 12:45
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think you are wrapping your exception in another exception (which isn't in your code above). If you try out this code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        throw new RuntimeException("Cannot move file");
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Error: " + ex.getMessage());
    }
}

...you will see a popup that says exactly what you want.


However, to solve your problem (the wrapped exception) you need get to the "root" exception with the "correct" message. To do this you need to create a own recursive method getRootCause:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        throw new Exception(new RuntimeException("Cannot move file"));
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,
                                      "Error: " + getRootCause(ex).getMessage());
    }
}

public static Throwable getRootCause(Throwable throwable) {
    if (throwable.getCause() != null)
        return getRootCause(throwable.getCause());

    return throwable;
}

Note: Unwrapping exceptions like this however, sort of breaks the abstractions. I encourage you to find out why the exception is wrapped and ask yourself if it makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Your getRootCause method is not protected against infinite recursion. –  Perception Jan 26 '12 at 12:30
    
@Perception, Unless the throwable has itself as its cause or you have some other super weird cyclic chain of causes you shouldn't need to worry about it. –  aioobe Jan 26 '12 at 12:40
    
@aioobe - True, those are the primary reasons to check. But it's not as rare an occurrence as you might think. –  Perception Jan 26 '12 at 12:47
2  
I disagree. I've never run across such situation. Actually, not even the designers of the Throwable-class takes that scenario into account considering the printStackTrace method. –  aioobe Jan 26 '12 at 12:51
    
Use org.apache.commons.lang3.exception.ExceptionUtils.getRootCause() instead of rolling your own –  Alex Dean Jun 1 at 9:56
add comment

My guess is that you've got something in method1 which wraps one exception in another, and uses the toString() of the nested exception as the message of the wrapper. I suggest you take a copy of your project, and remove as much as you can while keeping the problem, until you've got a short but complete program which demonstrates it - at which point either it'll be clear what's going on, or we'll be in a better position to help fix it.

Here's a short but complete program which demonstrates RuntimeException.getMessage() behaving correctly:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            failingMethod();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
        }
    }       

    private static void failingMethod() {
        throw new RuntimeException("Just the message");
    }
}

Output:

Error: Just the message
share|improve this answer
add comment

The name of the exception is part of the message string. You're going to have to do something like

catch(Exception ex)
{
    String message = ex.getMessage();
    message = message.substring(message.indexOf(":"), message.length);
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(nulll, "Error: "+ message);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It's really not (normally, e.g. in the sample given) - see my short but complete example... –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '12 at 12:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.