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I quickly wrote a C program extracting the i-th line of a set of gzipped files (containing about 500,000 lines). Here is my C program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <zlib.h>

/* compilation:
gcc  -o linesbyindex -Wall -O3 linesbyindex.c -lz
*/
#define MY_BUFFER_SIZE 10000000
static void extract(long int index,const char* filename)
   {
   char buffer[MY_BUFFER_SIZE];
   long int curr=1;
   gzFile in=gzopen (filename, "rb");
   if(in==NULL)
       {
       fprintf(stderr,"Cannot open \"%s\" %s.\n",filename,strerror(errno));
       exit(EXIT_FAILURE);              }
   while(gzread(in,buffer,MY_BUFFER_SIZE)!=-1 && curr<=index)
       {
       char* p=buffer;
       while(*p!=0)
           {
           if(curr==index)
               {
               fputc(*p,stdout);
               }
           if(*p=='\n')
               {
               ++curr;
               if(curr>index) break;
               }
           p++;
           }
       }
   gzclose(in);
   if(curr<index)
       {
       fprintf(stderr,"Not enough lines in %s (%ld)\n",filename,curr);
       }
   }

int main(int argc,char** argv)
   {
   int optind=2;
   char* p2;
   long int count=0;
   if(argc<3)
       {
       fprintf(stderr,"Usage: %s (count) files...\n",argv[0]);
       return EXIT_FAILURE;
       }
   count=strtol(argv[1],&p2,10);
   if(count<1 || *p2!=0)
       {
       fprintf(stderr,"bad number %s\n",argv[1]);
       return EXIT_SUCCESS;
       }
   while(optind< argc)
       {
       extract(count,argv[optind]);
       ++optind;
       }
   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
   } 

As a test, I wrote the following equivalent code in java:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.zip.GZIPInputStream;

public class GetLineByIndex{
   private int index;

   public GetLineByIndex(int count){
       this.index=count;
   }

   private String extract(File file) throws IOException
       {
       long curr=1;
       byte buffer[]=new byte[2048];
       StringBuilder line=null;
       InputStream in=null;
       if(file.getName().toLowerCase().endsWith(".gz")){
           in= (new GZIPInputStream(new FileInputStream(file)));
       }else{
           in= (new FileInputStream(file));
       }
             int nRead=0;
       while((nRead=in.read(buffer))!=-1)
           {
           int i=0;
           while(i<nRead)
               {
               if(buffer[i]=='\n')
                   {
                   ++curr;
                   if(curr>this.index) break;
                                     }
               else if(curr==this.index)
                   {
                   if(line==null) line=new StringBuilder(500);
                   line.append((char)buffer[i]);
                   }
               i++;
               }
           if(curr>this.index) break;
           }
       in.close();
       return (line==null?null:line.toString());
       }

   public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception{
       int optind=1;
       if(args.length<2){
           System.err.println("Usage: program (count) files...\n");
           return;
       }
       GetLineByIndex app=new GetLineByIndex(Integer.parseInt(args[0]));

       while(optind < args.length)
           {
           String line=app.extract(new File(args[optind]));
           if(line==null)
               {
               System.err.println("Not enough lines in "+args[optind]);
               }
           else
               {
               System.out.println(line);
               }
           ++optind;
           }
       return;
   }
} 

It happens that the java program was much faster (~1'45'') to fetch a large index than the C program (~2'15'') on the same machine (I ran that test several times).

How can I explain that difference ?

share|improve this question
1  
Note: The buffersizes are not equal hence the programs do not do the "exact" same thing. –  Sani Huttunen Jan 26 '12 at 12:27
    
@SaniHuttunen - the code is not equivalent for more reasons than that :) –  Perception Jan 26 '12 at 12:32
    
@Perception: True, but that was my first observation and seemed enough to point out that the programs are indeed not equal. –  Sani Huttunen Jan 26 '12 at 12:35
    
The C implementation has a 10Mb array instantiated on the process stack. Does that really run? Most processes have smaller stacks than that. –  Clifford Jan 26 '12 at 12:48
4  
Perhaps the compiler generates poor code on purpose because of the highly unorthodox coding style. That's what I would have done, had I been a compiler. –  Lundin Jan 26 '12 at 15:50
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5 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The most likely explanation for the Java version to be faster than the C version is that the C version is incorrect.

After fixing the C version, I obtained the following results (contradicting your claim that Java is faster than C):

Java 1.7 -client: 65 milliseconds (after JVM warmed up)
Java 1.7 -server: 82 milliseconds (after JVM warmed up)
gcc -O3:          37 milliseconds

The task was to print the 200000-th line from file words.gz. File words.gz was generated by gzipping /usr/share/dict/words.


...
static char buffer[MY_BUFFER_SIZE];
...
ssize_t len;
while((len=gzread(in,buffer,MY_BUFFER_SIZE)) > 0  &&  curr<=index)
    {
    char* p=buffer;
    char* endp=buffer+len;
    while(p < endp)
       {
...
share|improve this answer
    
what did you change in the C version please ? –  Pierre Jan 26 '12 at 14:22
    
+1 for investigation –  Savino Sguera Jan 26 '12 at 14:45
    
Thanks ! the first time I wrote my C code, I used gzgets instead of gzread but I didn't change the test in the loop over the buffer. –  Pierre Jan 26 '12 at 14:56
    
@Pierre: I see. If you rerun the benchmark on your computer with your files, is C faster than Java now? –  Atom Jan 26 '12 at 15:50
2  
for the record the standard java's gzip is inefficient. –  bestsss Jan 27 '12 at 23:35
show 6 more comments

Because fputc() isn't very fast and you're adding stuf char-by-char in your output file.

calling fputc_unlocked or rather delimiting the stuff you want to add and call fwrite() should be faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is incorrect. The author of the question did not specify the average length of a line in his GZIP files. –  Atom Jan 26 '12 at 14:17
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Well your programs are doing different things. I didn't profile your program, but from looking at your code I suspect this difference:

For building the line, you use this in Java:

if(curr==this.index)
{
    if(line==null) line=new StringBuilder(500);
    line.append((char)buffer[i]);
}

And this in C:

if(curr==index)
{
    fputc(*p,stdout);
}

I.e. you're printing one character at a time to stdout. Which is buffere, by default, but I suspect it's still slower than the 500 character buffer you use in Java.

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I do not have deeper knowledge about what optimizations the compiler performs, but I guess this what makes the difference between your programs. Microbenchmarks like this very, very, very hard to get right and meaningful. Here's an article by Brian Goetz that elaborates on this: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp02225/index.html

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Very large buffers can be slower. I would suggest you make the buffer size the same. i.e. both 2 or 8 KB

share|improve this answer
    
I started using stdio: BUFSIZ : ~ same result –  Pierre Jan 26 '12 at 12:54
    
In C (zlib) the large buffer does not matter at all, in java it does since it's copied multiple times. You can use a memory mapped file, just as well. Java's FileInputStream is (was?) optimized for smaller buffers 2K in Win, 8K - linux, in that case uses the stack to allocate, otherwise it's malloc/free (and some malloc are much slower than stack), that's why the smaller buffer performs better. I had horrid crashes in native memory when calling in deeper recursion, double SIGSEG and the process is dead (the 2nd happens when attempting to write the crash log, hence no crash log event) –  bestsss Jan 28 '12 at 8:52
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