Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Compare:

if (myVariable) {
    doSomething()
}

function doSomething ()
{
    // Work goes here
}

vs

doSomething();

function doSomething()
{
    if (myVariable) {
        // Work goes here
    }
}

ie My question is whether it's faster to do the check outside of the function and avoid a context switch (I think that's the right term) ) or just do it inside the function because it makes such a minor difference?

Cheers.

share|improve this question
    
Great Question! If myVariable is not always available the second example will only work if you give the variable as an argument to the function, I don't know if this is wisely. On the other hand you prevent certain mistakes. In my opinion: If myVariable must always be true to execute the function, use example two. If it's optional use example one. –  Tim Jan 26 '12 at 14:07
    
If you're asking about the cost of calling a function, then yes there is some cost, but how much will depend on the JavaScript implementation. There is less cost in newer implementations, but the cost is still there. –  squint Jan 26 '12 at 14:26
1  
Look after the pounds and the pennies will look after themselves :-) –  spraff Jan 26 '12 at 15:17
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It Just Doesn't Matter (although the first method avoids some work so it should faster, but by an amount which is probably less than statistical noise).

What really matters is which method best represents the logic. Rule of thumb is that every statement in a function should be on about the same level of abstraction. Is the conditional expression more or less abstract than the function call?

share|improve this answer
add comment

I find that the second method makes for more maintainable and readable code. This incurs very little overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps, perhaps not. Depends on the circumstances, no? –  spraff Jan 26 '12 at 15:03
add comment

It would be faster to do it outside because making a function call every time will be slightly slower than checking first and then calling the function.

But why bother? No one is going to notice a function call vs what the function call is actually doing. Inefficient DOM selectors that make your code have to hunt and peck through a huge tree structure for a few needles in the haystack are a far greater threat to performance.

share|improve this answer
    
A little context: Normally I'd agree that it's a really minuscule difference that normally isn't worth being concerned about, but the code is a library that other people will use, so it really needs not to be a bottleneck. –  Richard Jan 26 '12 at 15:07
    
Actually, forget that. I've just read the article and in summary: I'm worrying about nada. –  Richard Jan 26 '12 at 16:07
add comment

It's negligible; the differences in performance are miniscule, and browsers seem to handle this differently:

Edit: There is indeed a difference in performance: most browsers execute Method 1 slightly quicker.

//Method 1:

var t1 = Date.now();

myVariable = true;

for(var i = 0; i < 20000000; i++) {



    function doSomething ()
    {
        Math.sin(Math.cos(0));
    }

    if (myVariable) {
        doSomething()
    }

    myVariable = !myVariable;
}

console.log(Date.now() - t1);







//Method 2:

var t1 = Date.now();

myVariable = true;

for(var i = 0; i < 20000000; i++) {

    function doSomething()
    {
        if (myVariable) {
            Math.sin(Math.cos(0));
        }
    }


    doSomething();

    myVariable = !myVariable;

}

console.log(Date.now() - t1);





//Results:
//Safari:   About the same, former was slightly quicker
//Firefox:  Former was quicker
//Chrome:   About the same, latter was somewhat quicker
//Opera:    Executed the former quicker
share|improve this answer
1  
Your myVariable is always true, so you're not really measuring the cost of calling a function (because it's always being called). –  squint Jan 26 '12 at 14:25
    
Edit: You're right, there is a difference, I'll update it. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Jan 26 '12 at 14:50
    
Your test is poor because you're forcing the poor interpreter to recreate the same function over and over millions of times. Hence you're measuring the overhead of function creation, not function invocation. –  Alnitak Jan 26 '12 at 15:03
    
I modified the above code into a jsperf.com/test-of-function-call-overhead which i think says that the first method is faster than the second by like 15% on Chrome 12 –  Dan D. Jan 26 '12 at 15:20
    
@Dan D. Wow, it's quite a positive difference on my computer; the former is 50% faster! (Chrome 16.0.912.75 on Mac OS X 10.6.8) –  Jeffrey Sweeney Jan 26 '12 at 15:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.