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I have downloaded source code of glibc (GNU c library), version - 2.15.90. I was tracing the code of printf() function. I am using tools cscope and ctags to browse through code. Following is the path I traverse to understand printf() function. (Here, am just mentioning function calls) :-

1. Opening file "glibc/stdio-common/printf.c"
2. int __printf (const char *format, ...)
3. __extern_always_inline int vfprintf (FILE *__restrict __stream, const char *__restrict __fmt, _G_va_list __ap)
4. int attribute_hidden __vfprintf_chk (FILE *s, int flag, const char *fmt, va_list ap)
5. int attribute_compat_text_section __nldbl___vfprintf_chk (FILE *s, int flag, const char *fmt, va_list ap)

Once I reached upto function \__nldbl___vfprintf_chk(), there is a call to __vfprintf_chk() and thus last 2 functions (mentioned in point 4 and 5) calls each other. Where did I go wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see no such at calls, printf quickly jumps into vfprintf which does the real work I'd say your source code browser is acting up, glibc is pretty macro intensive.

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No, OP has GCC stack-check or stack-protector or something like that enabled (probably by default by OP's distribution...) which is full of interactions with glibc and causes calls to get redirected like this... –  R.. Jan 26 '12 at 15:32
    
So do you mean that vfprintf() directly calls write() system call to print the output on the screen. –  shanky Jan 27 '12 at 16:43
    
Well no, vfprintf makes writes (copies) into the stdio buffer which may or may not be buffered or flushed, and may or may not be attached to stderr or stdout, which may or may not be attached to the current terminal. –  Matt Joiner Jan 28 '12 at 3:25
    
ok. I got it. Thanks a lot for your comments. –  shanky Jan 28 '12 at 17:03

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