Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder how could I create something like std::map<T1, T2>(T1allocator, T2allocator, T1deallocator, T2deallocator) so that when any one tries to insert a key<->value pair into my map from any heap or modify some data data will be created in original map creators heap and not in other heaps that try to pass into it thire own data?


Say we have a DLL library (on Windows) and we dinamically (at runtime) attach it to our main app. That library ( as the main app) was compiled with static runtime. So will potentially get 2 difrent STL's and deffenetly 2 difrent heaps - one with DLL one with App.

Say now we want for our plugin/dll to work only with memory from our main app heap.

Lets get to some simple demo code.

We created a simple plugin interface that is known to our main app:

class plugin:
{
public:
    virtual void pass_and_modify_data( boost::shared_ptr<std::map<std::string, std::string> >  a) =0;
};

We created pugin DLL with:

#include "plug_in_interface.h"
class my_plugin: public plugin
{
    public:
        virtual void pass_and_modify_data( boost::shared_ptr<std::map<std::string, std::string> >  a)
        {
            a->insert(std::pair<std::string, std::string>("hello", "World"));
            (*a)["world"] = "hello";
        }
};

Now we want to pass map from our app to plugin but make all walues passed to our map be allocated on Main apps heap.

How to do such thing - how to make std::map reallocate given keys and values into main app hash with out plugin code developer noticing? (here by noticing I mean stuff like putting into maps strings with custome deallocators or writting any special non trivial code)


Looking at sehe's answer and demo I want to create:

If I got it write my main would look like:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/flyweight.hpp>
#include "plug_in_interface.h"

using namespace boost;
using namespace boost::flyweights;
typedef flyweight<
    std::string,
    hashed_factory<
     boost::hash<std::string>,
    std::equal_to<key_value>,
    std::allocator<boost::mpl::_1> // here we get errors like C2065: 'key_value' : undeclared identifier    
    >
> customString;

int main()
{
 // boring part -  load plugin... into something like boost::shared_ptr<plugin> my_plugin 
 //intresting part - create map in main heap and make all its values and keys be forced to be allocated or reallocated in main heap

    std::cout << std::endl << "Map allocator mased memory management:" << std::endl;
    std::cin.get();
    {
        boost::shared_ptr<std::map<std::string, std::string> > a  (new std::map<customString, customString>());
        my_plugin->pass_and_modify_data(a);
        std::cout << "modified data: " << (*a)["hello"] << (*a)["world"] << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "removed data" << std::endl;
    std::cin.get();

  }

Currently I can not compile this thing because of the way customString type is defined.. compiler shows tons of compiler errors. How to make type def more correct?

Jenerally I am absolutly fine with stl::allocators only thing I really need is for allocator to be some how binded to heap (alike we can do with shared_ptrs), is such thing possible?

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered just not doing that? (Don't link a shared library statically to it's runtime...). Also, if you construct the map in the main program and just pass it, the allocator gets copied along. –  sehe Jan 26 '12 at 21:58
    
@sehe: Why I need such anugly thing as link a shared library statically to it's runtime - to make end user have no need in installation of any runtimes=) Also my main app is compiled statically, what would be the point for plugins to be compiled dinamically? –  myWallJSON Jan 27 '12 at 0:40
    
that's a reversal. What is the point of dynamically loading if you want things to link dynamically? Also, why are you asking the question? There you have your reasons. Thinking about this, you could probably best solve this without dynamically linking but with a pure C plugin interface (use HANDLE idioms) or use COM to interface, which is exactly for this kind of purpose on Windows –  sehe Jan 27 '12 at 8:16

2 Answers 2

If you just want to provide functions to map that do the allocation, you’re out of luck. The standard way to control memory management within an STL container is through allocators.

You cannot use separate allocators for the keys and values, because std::map only accepts one allocator template parameter (std::map<Key, Value, Predicate, Allocator>). But there is no reason to do so—a single allocator for both will suffice.

If you just want a custom allocator, it’s straightforward to do. You can use one of the standard ones (alloc, pthread_alloc, single_client_alloc, or malloc_alloc), or read this tutorial to learn how to write your own. If you can provide more information about what problem you’re trying to solve, I may be able to provide a more helpful answer.

share|improve this answer
    
updated Question with demo details. –  myWallJSON Jan 26 '12 at 16:42

You could use a Boost Flywheight or a Boost Optional.

Though not exactly like the standard containers, they allow factory/allocation strategies and you could use that. Of course, you'll end up with another level of indirection which may, or may not, be what you want.

See, e.g. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_48_0/libs/flyweight/doc/tutorial/configuration.html#factories

hashed_factory<[Hash[,Pred[,Allocator]]]> ....

Suppose we would like to configure hashed_factory for a std::string flyweight with a special hash predicate special_hash and a custom allocator custom_allocator; this would be specified as follows:

typedef flyweight<
  std::string,
  hashed_factory<
    special_hash<std::string>,
    std::equal_to<key_value>,
    custom_allocator<boost::mpl::_1>
  >
> customString;

Since Flyweights are inherently immutable, they would work better for the keys:

 std::map<customString, int> my_funky_map;

Now, use the default map allocator to specify where the map's elements (pairs) should be allocated.


share|improve this answer
    
Added some details on what I actually try to test. Tried your proposal, got tons of compiler errors. Could you please show how to use flyweight on my example? –  myWallJSON Jan 26 '12 at 16:53
    
@myWallJSON: Erm... did you really try that? Here you go: ideone.com/0ncl1 - note that if both key and value use the same allocator, you are most likely way better off using std::map's allocator template param (allocating a std::pair of strings), which is much simpler. Then again, the question was explicitely not about that... –  sehe Jan 26 '12 at 17:44
    
Well) Provided code compiles, also my app is modifiable with it... but sadly it does not make values to be allocated in main heap when distributed into lib/app pair. –  myWallJSON Jan 26 '12 at 18:10
    
Oh well, turns out I didn't read the question too well (or it got edited after my initial reading). I've posted my latest thoughts in a comment at the Q. I thought that you were looking for a way to use a different allocator for the key vs. de value parts of the map element. (Apparently, John_Purdy had the same interpretation: 'You cannot use separate allocators for the keys and values, because...') –  sehe Jan 26 '12 at 22:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.