Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a singleton class

public sealed class Singleton
{
    static Singleton instance=null;
    static readonly object padlock = new object();

    Singleton()
    {
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            lock (padlock)
            {
                if (instance==null)
                {
                    instance = new Singleton();
                }
                return instance;
            }
        }
    }
}

my question is static Singleton instance=null; why this is static?

share|improve this question
    
This doesn't particularly look like a (current) threadsafe, performant singleton pattern in .Net. (I realize it's the MSDN P&P code for the pattern). See @JonSkeet 's csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx –  Tetsujin no Oni Jan 26 '12 at 16:49
    
Because if it wasn't, it wouldn't be a singleton. –  Etienne de Martel Jan 26 '12 at 16:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The 'instance' field holds the reference of the one and only instance.

It is stored in a static variable because its scope has to be the class itself and not a particular instance.

share|improve this answer

Because you are referencing the variable inside a static Property (Instance) and you can't reference instance variables inside static methods or properties.

The idea of having a Singleton is to only have one and only one instance at all times running.

share|improve this answer

The purpose of Singleton is to have only one instance of that object[1]. By making a sealed class with a private static instance which is automatically instantiated on first access, you provide its necessary trait of only creating one copy of the actual object that is then accessed by the Singleton.Instance property elsewhere in the system.

[1] within any AppDomain, anyway.

share|improve this answer

Because you only want one (static) instance ever in the program

share|improve this answer

It is static so every instance of the Singleton type will use the same variable, hence the "singleton" pattern.

share|improve this answer

Succinctly, Singleton is a design pattern used to ensure that only one instance of something is ever created within a given scope.

This pattern is accomplished by a few main concepts:

  1. creating a static instance of some object
  2. creating a private constructor
  3. disallowing the class to be extended by another (sealed)
  4. providing a static method that returns an instance of the static object

The example code you provided is a textbook example of the Singleton pattern.

share|improve this answer

Because it if would not be static, it would be a singleton only in name. And i could create thousands of instance of it.

share|improve this answer
1  
With a private constructor you can't create thousands of instances. –  Hasan Khan Jan 26 '12 at 16:46
    
With ap rivate constructor you can not create a SINGLE instance, which makes the singleton a noinstanceton. –  TomTom Jan 26 '12 at 16:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.