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How do I calculate the sum to below in C++? I tried the following code but failed.

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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int n, p, r = -1;
    cin >> n;
    for (p = 0; p < 10; p++)
        r *= (-1);
    cout << r << endl;
    return 0;
}
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2  
Wouldn't that just be 11? –  Mark B Jan 26 '12 at 16:45
    
That's basic maths, it's 1*(10+1). –  Flavius Jan 26 '12 at 16:45
1  
I suspect the sum should read sum( n=0, 10, (-1)^(n+1) ), so the result is either -1 or 0 –  John Jan 26 '12 at 16:48
3  
where the -1 comes from ? –  Felice Pollano Jan 26 '12 at 16:48
2  
that's still basic maths, no need for a loop, you just -1 * upperLimit%2 –  Flavius Jan 26 '12 at 16:51

3 Answers 3

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int p, r = 1;
    int iSum=0;
    // cin >> n;

    for (p = 0; p <= 10; p++)
    {
        r *= (-1);
        iSum+=r;
    }
    cout << iSum << endl;
    return 0;
}
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That's basic mathematics, there is no need for a loop, you can just calculate -1 * (upperLimit + 1)%2.

Look at the series and think: -1 +1 -1 +1 -1 +1 ....

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+1 yes, in general it would be x * upperLimit % 2. Great answer! –  Jonathan Henson Jan 26 '12 at 17:00
    
@MRM, that would produce a positive 1 or a 0, depending on the upderLimit. The only possible sums are -1 or 0. 10 % 2 = 0, 0 * -1 = 0. 11 % 2 = 1, 1 * -1 = -1. I think this is in an old Calculus book of mine as a telescoping series. I'll verify. –  Jonathan Henson Jan 26 '12 at 17:08
    
While accurate, this doesn't apply to more complex examples. –  Mooing Duck Jan 26 '12 at 17:31

Although @Flavius is right, the sum starts from 0 so it'll be -1 * (upperLimit+1)%2 as the sum iterates not 10 but 11 times. The upperLimit%2 thing works for sums starting at 1

P.S: Sorry for answering, I cannot yet comment, just registered.

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Thanks, I was aware of that but I was too lazy to fix it. +1 and welcome on SO. –  Flavius Jan 27 '12 at 0:43

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