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Hi guys I have a question about unix command line. I have many files like these:

/f/f1/file.txt

/f/f2/file.txt

/f/f3/file.txt

and so on...

I'd like copy all file.txt with their father folder in another folder g like:

/g/f1/file.txt

/g/f2/file.txt

/g/f3/file.txt

I can't copy all content of folder f because in each sub-folder f1, f2, ... I have many other files that I don't want copy.

How could I do this with the command line? Eventually using a bash script?

Thank you!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Manual for cp shows this option -

--parents
              use full source file name under DIRECTORY

So if you are on bash v4 you can do something like this -

[jaypal:~/Temp/f] tree
.
├── f1
│   ├── file.txt  # copy this file only with parent directory f1
│   ├── file1.txt
│   └── file2.txt
└── f2
    ├── file.txt  # copy this file only with parent directory f2
    ├── file1.txt
    └── file2.txt

2 directories, 6 files
[jaypal:~/Temp/f] mkdir ../g
[jaypal:~/Temp/f] shopt -s globstar
[jaypal:~/Temp/f] for file in ./**/file.txt; do cp --parents "$file" ../g ; done
[jaypal:~/Temp/f] tree ../g
../g
├── f1
│   └── file.txt
└── f2
    └── file.txt

2 directories, 2 files
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Thank you very much! This works like I wish! Thanks even for other answers! –  fibon82 Jan 26 '12 at 17:53
    
@fibon82: This is probably the simplest for your specific case, but have rsync in mind, as it's very powerful, particularly for more complex cases. –  Karolos Jan 26 '12 at 18:01
    
OK Karolos. Thank you too for your suggestion! –  fibon82 Jan 26 '12 at 18:06
    
@Jaypal: +1 because I didn't know of --parents. –  Karolos Jan 26 '12 at 18:09
    
@Jaypal +1. Is it possible to replace the for loop by simply cp --parents ./**/file.txt ../g? –  olibre Jan 27 '12 at 16:19

tar is sometimes helpful for coping files: see the small test:

kent$  tree t g
t
|-- t1
|   |-- file
|   `-- foo ---->####this file we won't copy
|-- t2
|   `-- file
`-- t3
    `-- file
g

3 directories, 4 files

kent$  cd t

kent$  find -name "file"|xargs tar -cf - | tar -xf - -C ../g

kent$  tree ../t ../g
../t
|-- t1
|   |-- file
|   `-- foo
|-- t2
|   `-- file
`-- t3
    `-- file
../g
|-- t1
|   `-- file
|-- t2
|   `-- file
`-- t3
    `-- file
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+1 I never thought using tar for a move. Excellent! The explanation is also very clear ;-) –  olibre Jan 27 '12 at 16:22

Take a look at rsync. Assuming you are in '/',

rsync -r f/ g/ --include "*/" --include "*/file.txt" --exclude "*"

The first include is necessary to tell rsync to look inside the subdirectories (and counteract the last exclude). The second include selects the files you want to copy. The exclude makes sure that other files are not processed in /f that are not of the required pattern.

Note: in case you have symbolic links, rsync will copy the link and not the file the link points to, unless you specify --copy-links.

Example:

$ find f g -type f
f/f1/file.txt
f/f1/fileNew.txt
f/f2/file.txt
f/f3/file.txt
find: g: No such file or directory
$ rsync -r f/ g/ --include "*/" --include "*/file.txt" --exclude "*"
$ find f g -type f
f/f1/file.txt
f/f1/fileNew.txt
f/f2/file.txt
f/f3/file.txt
g/f1/file.txt
g/f2/file.txt
g/f3/file.txt
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This seems like it's going to help you :

find /f/ -name file.txt -execdir cp -R . /g/ \;

It locates all the files named file.txt in directory /f/, and then, using execdir (which is executed in the directory containing the matched file), copies the directory containing the file to directory /g/.

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As far as I understand the command, it will copy the files to /g/ without preserving the relative paths, e.g. /g/f1/file.txt, and will overwrite the existing file.txt, i.e. you end up win one file in /g/, the last being copied. Did I miss something? –  Karolos Jan 26 '12 at 17:56
    
Yes, that's correct. I edited the post from cp to cp -R, which obviously makes more sense when copying directories. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jan 26 '12 at 17:58
    
I don't think the issue is related to -R. I ran your code on Mac OS X (which is BSD unix), and end up with /g/ having the union of files, with any given name corresponding to the last file with that name copied. –  Karolos Jan 26 '12 at 18:08

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