Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I'm hoping to find out what the correct syntax is to better organize Case statements in Flash AS3. So below for example instead of having 3 case statements, couldn't I organize it somehow into just 1?

switch (refID) 
{
    case "TS_38":
        pgBool = true;
        break;
    case "TS_37":
        pgBool = true;
        break;
    case "TS_36":
        pgBool = true;
        break;
    default:
        pgBool = false;
        //break;
}

I tried this, but it did not work in my test:

switch (refID) 
{
    case "TS_38", "TS_37", "TS_36":
        pgBool = true;
        break;
    default:
        pgBool = false;
        //break;
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

 switch (refID) 
{
case "TS_38":
case "TS_21":
case "TS_21":
    pgBool = true;
    break;

default:
    pgBool = false;
    //break;

}

share|improve this answer
    
Sweet thanks it works! That was quick :D –  Leon Gaban Jan 26 '12 at 17:18
    
You're welcome :) why do you have two identical cases? –  Sr.Richie Jan 26 '12 at 17:20
    
Oh that was by accident hehe, I had like 30 in there and was removing them fast... –  Leon Gaban Jan 26 '12 at 17:23

you can do this:

switch (refID) 
{
    case "TS_38":
    case "TS_21":
    case "TS_21":
        pgBool = true;
        break;
    default:
        pgBool = false;
        //break;
}
share|improve this answer

You could also use an if statement instead of switch, then you can use && and || operators:

if (refID == "TS_38" || refID == "TS_21" || refID == "TS_21") {
    pgBool = true;
} else {
    pgBool = false;
}

I can't help but notice...two of your cases are identical.

share|improve this answer

Don't know what other cases you might come across but with the example you gave you could remove the switch statement entirely with:

if(refId.split("_")[0] == "TS"){
    pgBool = true;
}
else{
    pgBool = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I could totally use this for something else, however for this project all our id's start with TS :( –  Leon Gaban Jan 30 '12 at 15:35

Consider not using switch case in this example. Switch case isn't the shortest way to write code and it often times prompts you to write redundant code (your example is a "good example of bad code").

What your code does could've been written like so:

pgBool = ["TS_38", "TS_21"].indexOf(refID) > -1;

or

pgBool = refID in {"TS_38" : "", "TS_21" : ""};

(most certainly you would like to reuse the array / object, if this function is to be called more then once).


As I've seen this answer been downvoted few times, I feel like it requires more in-depth explanation.

First of all, why using a hash-table is preferable to switch-case.

  1. It is scalable. If you store the hash-table outside the function that has to make the decision, you don't need to change the function that makes the decision, you add or remove a key from the table - which is more flexible and allows for more readable code. It also allows runtime modifications, impossible with switch-case.

  2. Hash-table is called so because it hashes the keys, ensuring that the access time of the value stored in the table is constant (and usually very small). At the same time switch-case in encoded in AS3 as a simple chain of if-else clauses, which means that the longer the switch case is, the more time it will take for the function to verify each condition. While switch-case gives you certain control over the order in which conditions are tested, you can rarely tell beforehand which will trigger more often. Hash-table would treat all conditions equally.

This means that, in practice, there is never a reason to prefer switch-case to hash-table. Some languages, like, notably, Python, don't even have this construct for the very same reasons.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh that's cool! Ok so basically Bool check if it matches, then it will = 0 or 1 huh? –  Leon Gaban Jan 26 '12 at 17:24
    
Sounds interesting, I've never used this technique. I will have a try in the future, but as far as I know indexOf method of Array is quite slow –  Sr.Richie Jan 26 '12 at 17:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.