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Having a large set of files I need to grep through, I'm doing it within a bash script like this:

#! /usr/bin/env bash

REX="word"
grep -IP $REX A* >> result &
grep -IP $REX B* >> result &
grep -IP $REX C* >> result &
grep -IP $REX D* >> result &
[..]

How to know when all the processes are finished?

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1  
Why not use find and xargs to find all the files you need and process them in parallel? –  Dan Fego Jan 26 '12 at 17:11
1  
or GNU or BSD parallel –  mkb Jan 26 '12 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would go about solving your problem a different way. find can find specific files on your filesystem, and xargs allows you to run commands on given input files. So I would use a command like this:

find ./ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I{} -n1 -P4 grep -IP $REX '{}' >> result

This would search, starting in the current directory (./) for all regular files (-type f), and pass them along to xargs safely in case there are any spaces in the filename (-print0). xargs then, for each command, runs your grep command. -I{} tells xargs that where it sees {} it will insert the filename into the command. Not strictly necessary here, but good practice. -0 goes hand in hand with -print0 from find, and tells it to expect input that way. -P4 tells xargs to run up to 4 processes at the same time, and -n1, as described by the man page, hints to xargs to only use one argument at a time per command.

There are various tweaks you can make here, whether it's not wanting to search for all files, or to only go to a certian depth, but this general command should get you started with this kind of task.

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The parallel execution of grep might lead to mingled output in the result file, and is thus a suboptimal idea. Once -P4 is out of the way, you can simply use find . -type f -exec grep -IPh $REX "{}" "+" >>result without the need for xargsing. (I gather that using xargs with -n1 will lead to no filename being print in front by grep, henceforth compensated by the -h grep option.) –  jørgensen Jan 26 '12 at 18:17

Use the bash built-in 'wait'

wait [n ...]

Wait for each specified process and return its termination status. Each n may be a process ID or a job specification; if a job spec is given, all processes in that job's pipeline are waited for. If n is not given, all currently active child processes are waited for, and the return status is zero. If n specifies a non-existent process or job, the return status is 127. Otherwise, the return status is the exit status of the last process or job waited for.

In your case it should be enough to just:

REX="word"
grep -IP $REX A* >> result &
grep -IP $REX B* >> result &
grep -IP $REX C* >> result &
grep -IP $REX D* >> result &

echo "Waiting..."
wait
echo "All child terminated"
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Try checking that the output of jobs -p | wc -l is zero lines long.

FYI: there are better ways to do parallel processing than using the shell as a job manager. find -print0 to xargs -0 -P is my personal favorite.

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can you elaborate on using find + xargs for grepping? thanks –  pistacchio Jan 26 '12 at 17:18
    
@pistacchio find . -maxdepth 1 -name "[ABCD]*" -print0 | xargs -0 grep -IP $REX >> result –  Borealid Jan 26 '12 at 17:21

use wait. I don't even think you need to save and specify pids in this case e.g.

    #! /usr/bin/env bash

REX="word"
grep -IP $REX A* >> result &
grep -IP $REX B* >> result &
grep -IP $REX C* >> result &
grep -IP $REX D* >> result &
[..]
wait
echo "done"

Note that there are way better ways to do this than listing everything out. You can pipe ls into xargs, or use exec with find, for instance.

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