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We need to use a "web service" which communicates extremely ugly XML. It is not developed by us and there is zero chance to make its developers understand proper XML.

FYI, this web service also accepts the same kind of XML in a HTTP GET URL parameter (not the request body) - and the guys who developed it don't understand why that is a bad practice.

So, what is the fastest way to map an XML such as this:

<foo id="document">
    <foo id="customer">
        <bar name="firstname" value="Joe"/>
        <bar name="lastname" value="Smith"/>
        <foo id="address">
            <bar name="city" value="New York"/>
            <bar name="country" value="USA"/>
        </foo>
    </foo>
    <bar name="somemoredata1" value="123"/>
    <bar name="somemoredata2" value="abc"/>
</foo>

into classes like this:

public class Document
{
    public Customer Customer { get; set; }

    public int SomeMoreData1 { get; set; }

    public string SomeMoreData2 { get; set; }
}

public class Customer
{
    public Address Address { get; set; }

    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    public string LastName { get; set; }
}


public class Address
{
    public string City { get; set; }

    public string Country { get; set; }
}

using eg. XML Serializer attributes or any other way that needs as little boilerplate code as possible.

I made up the foo and bar element names, but the structure of the XML I need to parse is based on the exact same convention.

I could of course implement IXmlSerializable manually in these classes or just make Foo and Bar classes and use those with the XmlSerializer, but none of these options seem to be a good solution.

Thanks in advance for your answers!

share|improve this question
1  
Do you need to do it with XmlSerialiser? I often find it easier just to parse-and-build with XmlReader even with good XML, never mind crazy XML. –  Jon Hanna Jan 26 '12 at 17:35
    
It would be simplest to parse it with XmlSerializer, yes. If you have a better or easier solution, write an answer! :) I'm curious about it. –  Venemo Jan 26 '12 at 17:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't do it with XML serializer attributes: there is just no way to make it take a field name out of a specified attribute. You will have to deserialize manually (possibly generating the boilerplate) or pre-process the XML — a simple XSLT along the following lines will do the trick:

<xsl:template match="foo">
  <xsl:element name="{@id}">
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </xsl:element>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="bar">
  <xsl:element name="{@name}">
    <xsl:value-of select="@value"/>
  </xsl:element>
</xsl:template>

Update: for the reverse transformation:

<xsl:template match="*[count(child::text())=1]">
  <bar value="{text()}" name="{local-name()}"/>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="*">
  <foo id="{local-name()}">
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </foo>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
Hah, your XSLT idea is so far the most elegant! One more thing about it: how can I transform the XML outputted by the serializer back to the ugly format? I'm asking because I'm kinda unfamiliar with XSLT. –  Venemo Jan 26 '12 at 22:18
    
Added xslt for the reverse transformation and fixed the other one. –  Anton Tykhyy Jan 27 '12 at 4:48
    
Thank you Anton! XSLT saves the day. :) –  Venemo Jan 27 '12 at 10:39

I haven't used the xml serializer or deserializer myself, but I do use LINQ to parse out my XML doc into objects. If your classes are fairly simply, you may look into that route.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for recommending LINQ to XML; however, if the XML pasted above is representative of the XML OP is receiving, it might prove challenging because it does not look well-formed (no root node for example). –  Tim Jan 26 '12 at 17:46
    
The reason I'm thinking about XmlSerializer is that it saves me from the need to write lots of boilerplate code. –  Venemo Jan 26 '12 at 18:01

Since you say in a comment that you are plumping for for XmlSerializer for simplicity rather than because that approach is enforced by other concerns, here's a different approach. Since it seems that the names of the elements is insignificant in the document, I ignore it in the parsing, though one can test that too. With more pleasant XML formats, that would be the main thing that the parsing would key off (generally with with a switch on the element names):

private static Document ParseDocument(XmlReader xr)
{
    Document doc = new Document();
    while(xr.Read())
      if(xr.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)
        if(xr.GetAttribute("id") == "customer")
          doc.Customer = ParseCustomer(xr.ReadSubtree());
        else
          switch(xr.GetAttribute("name"))
          {
            case "somemoredata1":
              doc.SomeMoreData1 = int.Parse(xr.GetAttribute("value"));
              break;
            case "somemoredata2":
              doc.SomeMoreData2 = xr.GetAttribute("value");
              break;
          }
      //Put some validation of doc here if necessary.
      return doc;
}
private static Customer ParseCustomer(XmlReader xr)
{
  Customer cu = new Customer();
  while(xr.Read())
    if(xr.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)
      if(xr.GetAttribute("id") == "address")
        cu.Address = ParseAddress(xr.ReadSubtree());
      else
        switch(xr.GetAttribute("name"))
        {
          case "firstname":
            cu.FirstName = xr.GetAttribute("value");
            break;
          case "lastname":
            cu.LastName = xr.GetAttribute("value");
            break;
        }
    //validate here if necessary.
    return cu;
}
private static Address ParseAddress(XmlReader xr)
{
  Address add = new Address();
  while(xr.Read())
    if(xr.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)
      switch(xr.GetAttribute("name"))
      {
        case "city":
          add.City = xr.GetAttribute("value");
          break;
        case "country":
          add.Country = xr.GetAttribute("value");
          break;
      }
  return add;
}

It's not exactly pretty (it's not terribly pretty with nice XML to work off, but it tends not to be quite as bad), but it works, and the use of subtrees can be nice with some complicated structures where the same type can turn up in different places within the document. One can replace the static methods that set values from the outside with contstructors that take the XmlReader which allows one to ensure class invariants, and/or have the objects immutable.

This approach comes into its own in the case of large documents that you want to deserialise as a large series of the same sort of items (or a large series of just a few types), because one can yield them out as they're created, which can make quite a difference to the delay to first response.

share|improve this answer
    
Jon. I almost downvoted your use of using in this case. The XmlReader was passed in to the method, and the caller may still need it. –  John Saunders Jan 26 '12 at 21:55
    
@JohnSaunders to do what? The doc in the OP would be read to the end when finished, so the only thing left to do with the XmlReader is dispose it. If they were going to want to "rewind" then they'd need to have it stored in some way (string, XmlDocument, etc) that they could still re-use either way, and the the XmlReader came from a ReadSubtree() then the call to Dispose() would not prevent further reading of the "parent" reader. Granted, I would likely have the using higher up the stack, but it should be in the complete use somewhere, so I put it in to represent good practice. –  Jon Hanna Jan 26 '12 at 22:00
    
Disposing a resource passed in to a method is not a best practice. –  John Saunders Jan 26 '12 at 22:08
    
Jon, this kind of code is a pain to write and maintain. This is exactly why I'd prefer the serializer. –  Venemo Jan 26 '12 at 22:15
    
@JohnSaunders Really, you wouldn't dispose an IDataReader created with CommandBehavior.CloseConnection and passed to an iterator method in the iterator method? –  Jon Hanna Jan 26 '12 at 22:20

You can try the "XML Schema Definition-Tool" ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/x6c1kb0s%28v=vs.80%29.aspx )

Ciao! Stefan

share|improve this answer
    
Why this downvote? –  habakuk Jan 27 '12 at 14:35

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