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I recently wrote a program that takes inputted char data, tests if it is acceptable (a-z, # marks the end of the input) and puts it in a stack which then tests to see if it's a palindrome. I was expecting to enter it one char by a time, but if I enter a string ended by pound it.. works. Here is some of the relevant code:

char buffer;
bool pound_test = false;
bool palindrome = false;
bool keep_going = true;
stack<char> stack1, stack2, stack3;
string str = "";

cout << "Please enter a string, then end it with the pound sign. " << endl;

while(pound_test == false) {
    cin >> buffer;

    if((buffer >= 97) && (buffer <= 122))
    {
        stack1.push(buffer);
        stack2.push(buffer);
        str += buffer;
    }

    if((buffer >= 65) && (buffer <= 90)) {
        buffer = buffer + 32;
        stack1.push(buffer);
        stack2.push(buffer);
        str += buffer;
    }

    if(buffer == '#')
        pound_test = true;
}

So, when the user enters one long string, like "racecar#" and presses enter, the program properly puts it into the stack. My question is simply: why? Wouldn't the data have to be inputted one char at a time for it to work properly, because the cin is in the loop itself, and the loop has to repeat to enter multiple chars into the stack, right? Thanks!

Edit: Thanks for the answers/comments everyone! I'm really impressed by the quick and kind replies. I'm certainty going to use this site again.

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1  
That's just not how cin is defined to work. It will read up the first blank. If you want to read one at a time, use cin.get or getchar –  frankc Jan 26 '12 at 17:37
1  
I don't get it, that won't even compile, there's a ; after stack<char>... –  Blindy Jan 26 '12 at 17:37
    
@Blindy: Sorry, that's a formatting mistake :P –  minitech Jan 26 '12 at 17:39
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@frankc: It will only read to the first blank if the operand is a std::string or char*. That is not the case here, it is merely a char, it reads only a single char. The reason for the behaviour is not what you are suggesting. –  Clifford Jan 26 '12 at 18:03
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@clifford you are right, i did not notice that –  frankc Jan 26 '12 at 18:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Console input (via the cin std::istream object) in most systems is line buffered. So when you call cin::operator>> for a single character, the function does not in fact return until you press newline (because the underlying I/O system does not make data available to cin until then). Any data entered up-to and including the <newline> will be buffered and subsequent calls to cin::operator>> will be serviced from the buffer until it is exhausted.

In this case cin >> buffer, where buffer is of type char will indeed get a single character, but before that the console buffered an entire line and will use it to satisfy subsequent console input operations.

If you step through your code in your debugger the operation may be clearer to you.

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Thanks! That pretty much answers my question. So if there is another call in the program to cin, and there are characters left in the buffer, it will read from that instead of the user input? –  Nathan Jan 26 '12 at 17:46
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@Nathan: Yes, I added more to the answer which may clarify that. –  Clifford Jan 26 '12 at 17:52
    
Thanks, I appreciate it. –  Nathan Jan 26 '12 at 17:55

The "system" (OS, library, whatever — depends on the implementation) ate the string of data coming from input, but your program read it char by char.

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1  
With the understanding that "your program read it char by char" is because of the use of operator >> (char) and not operator >> (char*) - cin "knows" you only want one char at a time. –  Matt Jan 26 '12 at 17:50
    
@Matt Do you think it would be better form to do what I did (cin >> char) or have the user input a char string and then use a loop to enter it, char by char (well, entering the chars I want it to), into the stacks? –  Nathan Jan 26 '12 at 18:13

While all the answers about os buffering are true, I think the confusion can be traced to cin's operator >> (char); because C++ can overload methods based on their argument types, the char version of operator >> is only assigning one character at a time, even though the whole string is buffered. I believe you're thinking that operator >> should try to put the whole string into your character; but since it "knows" you're reading one character at a time, it only assigns one character at a time. I'm not sure if this is specified behavior for cin or not, but that seems to be what's happening.

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The cin operator reads from the standard input stream (if not configured otherwise). The stdin works as follows: you type and when you press Enter, it is sent to stdin and therefore cin reads the whole string up to the moment when you pressed Enter.

If you wish to read char by char, you should use getchar.

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cin does not read the whole line when the right-hand operand of >> is a char. Data is only made available to cin after a newline for line-buffered console input. The underlying system-level console I/O performs the buffering not the cin object. –  Clifford Jan 26 '12 at 17:46
    
I looked it up and, indeed, it looks like istream's >> has a special case for char which will only extract one character from the stream. It would mean that the buffering, as you said, is performed at a different level. Thanks! –  Ivan Zarea Jan 26 '12 at 18:31
    
It is not really a "special case", the multiple overloads for different types is how C++ iostreams avoid the need for format specifiers like C's stdio scanf() for example. This is equivalent to scanf()'s %c format specifier, while you were thinking of the %s equavalent. Unlike scanf() it is extensible; you can add your own overloads to initialise other object classes as necessary. –  Clifford Jan 26 '12 at 22:01

The way your keyboard input is seen by cin >> buffer;is not a property of your program, but of the combination of OS, Shell, C runtime and maybe thousand things I forgot.

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