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One of the first things I learned in C++ was that

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    std::cout<<"Hello, World!\n";
    return 0;
}

would simply appear and disappear extremely quickly without pause. To prevent this, I had to go to notepad, and save

helloworld.exe
pause

ase

helloworld.bat

This go tedious when I needed to create a bunch of small test programs, and eventually I simply put while(true); at the end on most of my test programs, just so I could see the results. Is there a better wait function I can use?

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put a breakpoint on the return function –  Mooing Duck Feb 20 '13 at 20:01

11 Answers 11

up vote 36 down vote accepted

you can require the user to hit enter before closing the program... something like this works.

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  std::cout << "Hello, World\n";
  std::cin.ignore();
  return 0;
}

The cin reads in user input, and the .ignore() function of cin tells the program to just ignore the input. The program will continue once the user hits enter.

Link

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Please note that the code above was tested on Code::Blocks 12.11 and Visual Studio 2012
on Windows 7.

For forcing your programme stop or wait, you have several options :


  • sleep(unsigned int)

The value has to be a positive integer in millisecond. That means that if you want your programme wait for 2 second, enter 2000.

Here's an example :

#include <iostream>     //for using cout
#include <stdlib.h>     //for using the function sleep

using namespace std;    //for using cout

int main(void)         
{
   cout << "test" << endl;
   sleep(5000);         //make the programme waiting for 5 secondes
   cout << "test" << endl;
   sleep(2000);         // wait for 2 secondes before closing

   return 0;
}

If you wait too long, that probably means the parameter is in second. So change it like that :

sleep(5);

For those who get error message or problem using sleep try to replace it by _sleep or Sleep especially on Code::Bloks.
And if you still getting probleme, try to add of one this library on the biggining of the code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <dos.h>
#include <windows.h>

  • system("PAUSE")

A simple "Hello world" programme on windows console application would probably close before you can see anything. That the case where you can use system("Pause").

#include <iostream>    

using namespace std;   

int main(void)         
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

    system("PAUSE");

    return 0;
}

If you get the message "error: 'system' was not declared in this scope" just add the following line at the biggining of the code :

#include <cstdlib>

  • cin.ignore()

The same result can be reached by using cin.ignore() :

#include <iostream>     

using namespace std;    

int main(void)         
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

    cin.ignore();

    return 0;
}

  • cin.get()

example :

#include <iostream>     

using namespace std;    

int main(void)         
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

  • getch()

Just don't forget to add the library conio.h :

#include <iostream>     
#include <conio.h>    //for using the function getch()

using namespace std;    

int main(void)
{

    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

    getch();

    return 0;
}

You can have message telling you to use _getch() insted of getch

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the equivalent to the batch program would be

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    std::cout<<"Hello, World!\n";
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

The additional line does exactly what PAUSE does, waits for a single character input

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The appearance and disappearance of a window for displaying text is a feature of how you are running the program, not of C++.

Run in a persistent command line environment, or include windowing support in your program, or use sleep or wait on input as shown in other answers.

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What you have can be written easier. Instead of:

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    std::cout<<"Hello, World!\n";
    return 0;
}

write

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    std::cout<<"Hello, World!\n";
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

The system function executes anything you give it as if it was written in the command prompt. It suspends execution of your program while the command is executing so you can do anything with it, you can even compile programs from your cpp program.

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Syntax:

void sleep(unsigned seconds);

sleep() suspends execution for an interval (seconds). With a call to sleep, the current program is suspended from execution for the number of seconds specified by the argument seconds. The interval is accurate only to the nearest hundredth of a second or to the accuracy of the operating system clock, whichever is less accurate.

This example should make it clear:

#include <dos.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

int main()
{
   printf("Message 1\n");
   sleep(2); //Parameter in sleep is in seconds
   printf("Message 2 a two seconds after Message 1");
   return 0;
}

Remember you have to #include dos.h

EDIT:

You could also use winAPI.

VOID WINAPI Sleep(
DWORD dwMilliseconds
);

Sleep Function(Windows)

Just a note,the parameter in the function provided by winapi is in milliseconds ,so the sleep line at the code snippet above would look like this "Sleep(2000);"

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You can use sleep() or usleep().

// Wait 5 seconds
sleep( 5 );
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3  
Note that sleep() isn't part of the C standard. It's defined by Posix, and I believe you have to use Sleep() on Win32. –  Bastien Léonard May 23 '09 at 19:53

Before the return statement in you main, insert this code:

system("pause");

This will hold the console until you hit a key.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string s;
    cout << "Please enter your first name followed by a newline\n";
    cin >> s;
    cout << "Hello, " << s << '\n';
    system("pause");
    return 0; // this return statement isn't necessary
}
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getchar() provides a simplistic answer (waits for keyboard input). Call Sleep(milliseconds) to sleep before exit. Sleep function (MSDN)

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Well, this is an old post but I will just contribute to the question -- someone may find it useful later:

adding 'cin.get();' function just before the return of the main() seems to always stop the program from exiting before printing the results: see sample code below:

int main(){ string fname, lname;

  //ask user to enter name first and last name
  cout << "Please enter your first name: ";
  cin >> fname;

  cout << "Please enter your last name: ";
  cin >> lname;     
  cout << "\n\n\n\nyour first name is: " << fname << "\nyour last name is: " 
  << lname <<endl;

  //stop program from exiting before printing results on the screen
  cin.get();
  return 0;

}

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1  
A lot of people have already answered the exact same thing before you. No need to clutter this page up. –  wrongusername Aug 17 '11 at 23:01

The second thing to learn (one would argue that this should be the first) is the command line interface of your OS and compiler/linker flags and switches.

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