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I'm trying to make a xmlHttpRequest before the page body loads. When trying to assign the onreadystatechange function, this one gets called instantly, thus returning xmlHttp.readyState always to 0.

I supose I'm making the call in a wrong way. How am I supposed to assign the function correctly?

//create xmlHttp object
function CreateXmlHttp() {
    try {
        var xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
    } catch(e) {
        try {
            xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
        } catch(eo) {
            xmlHttp = null;
        }
    }
    if(!xmlHttp && typeof XMLHttpRequest != "undefined") {
        xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    return xmlHttp;
}

//request call
function post(url, func, XML) {
    var xmlHttp = CreateXmlHttp();
    //problem?
    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = (function (xmlHttp, func) {
        if(xmlHttp.readyState == 4 && xmlHttp.status == 200) {
            func(xmlHttp.responseText);
        }
    })(xmlHttp, func);
    xmlHttp.open("POST", url, true);
    xmlHttp.setRequestHeader('Content-Type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=utf-8');
    if(XML==null){
        XML = '';
    }
    xmlHttp.send(XML);
}

post('/json/checklogged', function (data) {
    var jsonData = eval("(" + data + ")"); //I know, this eval is dangerous
    if(jsonData.logged){
        var url = '${nextUrl}';
        post(url, function(data){
            document.open();
            document.write(data);
            document.close();
        });
        history.pushState({}, '', url);
    }
});
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = function () {
    if(xmlHttp.readyState == 4 && xmlHttp.status == 200) {
        func(xmlHttp.responseText);
    }
};

Don't execute the function at all. You're assigning a listener, i.e. creating (not executing) the function that will be called at the appropriate time.

The values inside the function will be in scope, so there's no need to pass them (which wouldn't help because the even delegation won't pass them anyway). It's called lexical scoping, or static scoping, or functional scoping (these terms aren't identical, but they're similar enough in this context).

share|improve this answer
    
Can func be referenced that way? I mean, when onreadystatechange fires... –  I.G. Pascual Jan 26 '12 at 18:37
    
@Nacho if it's a function, sure. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Jan 26 '12 at 18:38
    
@davin Sorry, I wasn't clear, I mean if func will be in the scope even when post function finishes executing –  I.G. Pascual Jan 26 '12 at 18:41
    
@Nacho, yes, that's what I wrote. The environment model performs lookup within the context of the function definition. Since when you defined the function the variables are in scope, even after the outer function finishes executing they will remain in scope. –  davin Jan 26 '12 at 18:43
    
@davin good to know, thanks!! –  I.G. Pascual Jan 26 '12 at 18:45

It gets called instantly because you're calling it right after defining it:

xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = (function (xmlHttp, func) {
    ...
})(xmlHttp, func);
  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You just need:

xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = function () {
    if(xmlHttp.readyState == 4 && xmlHttp.status == 200) {
        func(xmlHttp.responseText);
    }
};

This creates a closure around the xmlHttp and func objects, allowing you to use them in the function when onreadystate occurs, even after the post function has completed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Cameron! I can't accept more than one answer, so I do the fastest correct one. –  I.G. Pascual Jan 26 '12 at 18:47
1  
@Nacho: Sure! Glad to have helped. Missed it by 28 seconds... ;-) –  Cameron Jan 26 '12 at 18:50

onreadystatechange is a callback, and should not be self-executed. This should work:

xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = function () {
        if(xmlHttp.readyState == 4 && xmlHttp.status == 200) {
            func(xmlHttp.responseText);
        }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
As-is that probably won't work, because you'll end up binding the two identifiers to undefined values (or whatever the event delegation passes, which I can't recall), you'll need to remove the parameters. –  davin Jan 26 '12 at 18:41
    
Good catch. I'll fix it. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Jan 26 '12 at 18:42
    
Thanks @JeffreySweeney –  I.G. Pascual Jan 26 '12 at 18:47

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