Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
if [ ! -f ./* ]; then
  for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do
    echo $files
else
  echo Nothing here
fi

Returns

syntax error near unexpected token `else'

New to this. Can anyone point me to what I did wrong?

share|improve this question
    
I didn't down vote but there is one quote in your last echo. – jaypal singh Jan 26 '12 at 19:29
    
Please do not change your question for an entirely different issue. You already had 3 answers explaining that you were missing "done". Your code actually doesn't make much sense. You want to cd into a directory if it doesn't exist? Why do you expect that reading the first line of the file will give you a filename? – jordanm Jan 26 '12 at 19:29
    
@jordanm New to this. cut me some slack. nvr wrote shell scripts until yesterday cause my boss needs a script made on a server and the person who originally does it quit. I'm trying here =/ – Mechaflash Jan 26 '12 at 19:32
1  
@Mechaflash writing something for production while learning a new language rarely has good results. After you are finished writing something that meets the specs, be prepared to throw it out and do it better using new knowledge you have picked up. My downvote was for changing the question, not the quality of your code. mywiki.wooledge.org/BashGuide – jordanm Jan 26 '12 at 19:35
    
apologies. i'll revert the question back to its original form and start another post – Mechaflash Jan 26 '12 at 19:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You forgot done!

if [ ! -f ./* ]; then
  for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do
    echo $files
  done
else
  echo Nothing here
fi
share|improve this answer

The reason you get a syntax error is because you are not ending the loop with the "done" statement. You should be using a while loop, instead of a for loop in this case, as the for loop will break if any of the filenames contain spaces or newlines.

Also, the test command you have issued will also give a syntax error if the glob expands to multiple files.

$ [ ! -f ./* ]
bash: [: too many arguments

Here is a better way to check if the directory contains any files:

files=(./*) # populate an array with file or directory names
hasfile=false
for file in "${files[@]}"; do
   if [[ -f $file ]]; then
      hasfile=true
      break
   fi
done

if $hasfile; then
   while read -r file; do
      echo "$file"
   done < <(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f)
fi

Also, you could simply replace the while loop with find -print if you have GNU find:

if $hasfile; then
   find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -print
fi
share|improve this answer
    
you're right about my file check. I'll change that as well. – Mechaflash Jan 26 '12 at 19:27

The syntax for "for" is

for: for NAME [in WORDS ... ;] do COMMANDS; done

You are missing the "done"

Try

if [ ! -f ./* ]; then
  for files in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f); do
    echo $files
  done
else
  echo Nothing here
fi

BTW, did you mean echo with lowercase rather than ECHO?

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, did you mean echo with lowercase rather than ECHO? Yes I did. Thanks – Mechaflash Jan 26 '12 at 19:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.